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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the incidence of complications in the intraoperative and postoperative period for dogs undergoing nephrectomy for renal disease.

ANIMALS

69 dogs.

METHODS

Medical records of dogs undergoing nephrectomies for renal disease were reviewed for signalment, date of surgery, results of blood analyses, and intra- and postoperative complications. Long-term follow-up was obtained via client telephone interview or referring veterinarian medical records. A Fisher exact test was used to assess the relationship between postoperative acute kidney injury and NSAID administration with long-term development of chronic kidney disease.

RESULTS

Complications occurred in 44.9% and 42.6% of dogs in the intraoperative and postoperative periods, respectively. Most of these were lower-grade complications, though a total of 7 dogs died during the postoperative period. An acute kidney injury was diagnosed in 12 dogs postoperatively, with 2 dogs euthanized due to the severity of the injury. Long-term follow-up was available for 53 dogs, with 24 (45.3%) dogs developing chronic kidney disease. Postoperative acute kidney injury (P = .385) and NSAID administration (P = .519) were not statistically associated with the development of chronic kidney disease in this population.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Unilateral nephrectomy is associated with high intraoperative and postoperative complication rates in dogs. Chronic kidney disease was diagnosed in almost 50% of the population with available long-term follow-up.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess factors associated with increased pleural fluid and air evacuation, longer duration of thoracostomy tube usage, and longer hospitalization in dogs and cats following surgery for thoracic neoplasms.

ANIMALS

62 dogs and 10 cats.

METHODS

Medical records were reviewed for dogs and cats undergoing thoracic surgeries between August 1, 2019, and June 30, 2023, for resection of suspected neoplasia in which a thoracostomy tube was placed. Data collected included patient signalment, type of procedure performed, histologic diagnosis of the primary mass removed, volume of fluid and air evacuated from the thoracostomy tube, and time in hospital.

RESULTS

Median sternotomy was associated with increased total fluid evacuation (median, 12.1 mL/kg; IQR, 15.4 mL/kg; P = .012), whereas rib resection was associated with increased total air evacuation (median, 2.1 mL/kg; IQR, 13.6 mL/kg; P = .06). The presence of preoperative pleural effusion was associated with higher total fluid evacuation (20.6 mL/kg; IQR, 32.1 mL/kg; P = .009), longer duration with a thoracostomy tube in place (42.5 hours; IQR, 41.9 hours; P = .027), and longer hospitalization period (61 hours; IQR, 52.8 hours; P = .025). Cats had a thoracostomy tube in place for a longer time compared to dogs (median, 42.6 hours; IQR, 23.5 hours; P = .043).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Animals undergoing median sternotomy and rib resection may be expected to have higher fluid and air volumes, respectively, evacuated postoperatively. This often leads to an increased duration of thoracostomy tube usage and a longer period of hospitalization.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association