Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Carl S. Ribble x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To compare health performance during the first 28 days in the feedlot for vaccinated or conditioned feeder calves sold through special auctions in Ontario with health performance for calves sold through conventional auctions in the province.

Design—Cohort study.

Animals—12,313 calves sold through conventional and special auctions at the Keady Livestock Market during the fall of 1999 and 2000.

Procedure—Buyers of calf groups were approached at the auction market or contacted by telephone and asked to record the number of calves requiring treatment for bovine respiratory tract disease (BRD) during the first 28 days after purchase.

Results—211 calf groups (≥ 20 calves/group) were followed up for 28 days after purchase. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that vaccinated calves purchased through special auctions were 0.68 (95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 0.93) times as likely to receive treatment for BRD as were calves purchased at conventional auctions and that conditioned calves were 0.22 (95% confidence interval, 0.12 to 0.38) times as likely to receive treatment. Groups that received antimicrobials by injection on arrival at the feedlot were 0.64 (95% confidence interval, 0.43 to 0.96) times as likely to be treated as were groups that did not.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that vaccinated and conditioned calves were less likely to receive treatment for BRD during the first 28 days in the feedlot; however, there was no difference in mortality rate. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223: 677–683)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether vaccinated or conditioned feeder calves sold through special auctions in Ontario commanded a premium, compared with feeder calves sold at conventional auctions, and whether various physical characteristics of the calves were associated with the sale price.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—14,037 calves sold through conventional and special auctions at the Keady Livestock Market during the fall of 1999 and 2000.

Procedure—Calves were observed as they were sold by lot in the auction ring. Lot characteristics and the price received for each lot were recorded. Multivariate analysis was used to estimate the effect of lot characteristics and sale type on price.

Results—Information was recorded for 2,601 calf lots. Multivariate analysis indicated that various lot characteristics were associated with sale price, with 68% of the variation explained by the model. Overall, lots sold at special auctions received a premium of $0.06/lb (Canadian dollars), compared with lots sold at conventional auctions. However, the premium varied with mean body weight of the lot and year. In addition, frame size, breed, body condition score, uniformity of the lot, weaning status, mean body weight, lot size, sex, year, and sale type were significantly related to sale price.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that producers selling calves at special auctions at this market received a premium, compared with producers selling calves at conventional auctions. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223:670–676)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives—To determine perceptions of veterinary technical and professional skills among veterinary students and recent graduates.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Sample Population—281 students and 142 recent graduates from the Ontario Veterinary College.

Procedure—A survey was designed and administered to first- through fourth-year students and veterinarians who had graduated either 1 or 6 years before survey administration.

Results—Overall response rate was 70%. Learning about technical and professional skills was highly valued. Most participants felt they had not received instruction about professional skills, but those who had felt more competent about them. Perceptions of competence increased slightly with increased comfort discussing emotional veterinary issues with instructors. Neither gender nor increased age was related to increased feelings of competence. Almost all fourth-year students felt competent and comfortable about examining an animal with the client present, assessing suffering, diagnosing parvovirus infection, performing surgery, and working as group members. However, many did not feel competent or comfortable about delivering bad news, setting time limits yet providing quality service, helping clients with limited funds make treatment decisions, dealing with demanding people, and euthanasia. Feelings of competence and comfort were closely related but were not identical.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In the interests of best preparing entry-level veterinarians, technical and professional skills need to be emphasized in a learning environment where students feel comfortable discussing emotional veterinary issues. A professional skills curriculum addressing underlying selfawareness, communication, and interpersonal issues, as well as procedural matters, would likely increase the proportion of fourth-year students who feel competent and comfortable about professional skills by the end of their undergraduate training. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:924–931)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe client and veterinarian perceptions of client-centeredness during euthanasia discussions and assess agreement between measures of these perceptions.

DESIGN

Descriptive study.

SAMPLE

Stratified random sample of 32 companion animal veterinarians in southern Ontario.

PROCEDURES

2 case scenarios (a geriatric dog with worsening arthritis and a cat with inappropriate urination) designed to initiate euthanasia discussions were presented by 2 different undisclosed standardized clients (USCs) to study veterinarian communication during clinical visits. At the end of appointments, the USC's identity was disclosed, and questionnaires to measure veterinarian and client perceptions of client-centeredness were completed. Agreement was assessed by statistical methods.

RESULTS

Data were analyzed from 60 appointments (30/scenario). Of 10 questions, significant agreement was found between veterinarians and USCs for only 1 (extent to which relevant personal and family issues were discussed; κ = 0.43) for the dog scenario and 3 (extent of discussion of respective roles [κ = 0.43], better preparedness of the USC to make a euthanasia decision [κ = 0.42], and discussion of relevant personal and family issues [κ = 0.25]) for the cat scenario. When the USC and veterinarian disagreed, the veterinarian perceived that the client-centeredness components were addressed more thoroughly than did the USC.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Lack of agreement was found between USC and veterinarian perceptions, with USCs perceiving less client-centeredness in euthanasia discussions. This communication gap suggested the need for training of veterinarians in eliciting client perspectives and assessing lifestyle-social information, including client social support systems.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize veterinarian-client communication with undisclosed standardized clients (USCs) during discussions regarding euthanasia of a pet.

Design—Descriptive study.

Sample Population—32 companion animal veterinarians (16 males and 16 females) in southern Ontario.

Procedures—During 2 clinic visits, 2 cases (a geriatric dog with worsening arthritis and a cat with inappropriate urination) designed to stimulate discussion regarding euthanasia of a pet were presented by different USCs (individuals trained to consistently present a particular case to veterinarians without disclosing their identity). Discussions were audio recorded and analyzed by use of the measure of patient-centered communication (MPCC [a tool to assess and score physician communication behaviors]). Veterinarian and client statements were classified by means of 3 patient-centered components: exploring both the disease and the illness experience, understanding the whole person, and finding common ground.

Results—60 usable recorded discussions were obtained (31 veterinarians; 30 discussions/case). Overall, MPCC scores were significantly lower for the geriatric dog case. For both cases, veterinarians scored highest on finding common ground and lowest on exploring both the disease and the illness experience. Lack of exploration of client feelings, ideas, and expectations and the effect of the illness on the animal's function resulted in low scores among veterinarians.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that the use of USCs and the MPCC are feasible methods for analysis of veterinarian-client communication during companion animal euthanasia discussions. Findings suggested that some veterinarians do not fully explore client concerns or facilitate client involvement in euthanasia decision making.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association