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  • Author or Editor: Carl A. Osborne x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine hospital proportional morbidity rates (HPMR) for urethral obstructions, urethral plugs or urethroliths, and urethrostomies in cats in veterinary teaching hospitals (VTH) in Canada and the United States between 1980 and 1999.

Design—Epidemiologic study.

Animals—305,672 cats evaluated at VTH.

Procedures—Yearly HPMR were determined for cats with urethral obstructions, urethral plugs or urethroliths, or urethrostomies from data compiled by the Purdue Veterinary Medical Database. The test for a linear trend in proportions was used.

Results—Urethral obstructions were reported in 4,683 cats. Yearly HPMR for urethral obstructions declined from 19 cases/1,000 feline evaluations in 1980 to 7 cases/1,000 feline evaluations in 1999. Urethral plugs or urethroliths affected 1,460 cats. Yearly HPMR for urethral plugs or urethroliths decreased from 10 cases/1,000 feline evaluations in 1980 to 2 cases/1,000 feline evaluations in 1999. A total of 2,359 urethrostomies were performed. Yearly HPMR for urethrostomies decreased from 13 cases/1,000 feline evaluations in 1980 to 4 cases/1,000 feline evaluations in 1999.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Frequency of feline urethrostomies performed at VTH in Canada and the United States declined during the past 20 years and paralleled a similar decline in frequency of urethral obstructions and urethral plugs or urethroliths. These trends coincide with widespread use of diets to minimize struvite crystalluria in cats, which is important because struvite has consistently been the predominant mineral in feline urethral plugs during this period. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:502–505)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine proportional morbidity rates (PMR) and risk factors for lower urinary tract diseases (LUTD) in cats.

Design—Case-control study.

Sample Population—Records of 22,908 cats with LUTD and 263,168 cats without LUTD.

Procedure—Data were retrieved from the Purdue Veterinary Medical Data Base. Descriptive statistics and univariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess whether breed, age, sex, and neutering status were associated with different causes of LUTD.

Results—Mean PMR for LUTD irrespective of cause was 8/100 cats (range, 2 to 13/100 cats). Increased risk for urocystolithiasis (Russian Blue, Himalayan, and Persian cats), bacterial urinary tract infections (UTI; Abyssinian cats), congenital urinary tract defects (Manx and Persian cats), and urinary incontinence (Manx cats) was detected. Cats between 2 and < 7 years of age had increased risk for urethral plugs, neurogenic disorders, congenital defects, and iatrogenic injuries. Cats between 4 and < 10 years of age had increased risk for urocystolithiasis, urethral obstructions, and idiopathic LUTD. Cats ≥ 10 years of age had increased risk for UTI and neoplasia. Castrated males had increased risk for each cause of LUTD except UTI and incontinence. Spayed females had increased risk for urocystolithiasis, UTI, and neoplasia. Sexually intact females had decreased risk for each cause of LUTD except neurogenic disorders and iatrogenic injuries.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Specific breed, age, sex, and neutering status may be associated with specific types of feline LUTD. Knowledge of patient risk factors for LUTD may facilitate development of surveillance strategies that enhance earlier detection. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:1429–1435)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the reproducibility and accuracy of 4 portable pH meters, a reagent strip, and pH paper for measuring urine pH in dogs.

Design—Prospective masked randomized study.

Sample Population—201 free-catch urine samples from 114 hospitalized dogs.

Procedures—Urine samples were divided into 2-mL aliquots. Measurements of urine pH were obtained by use of a laboratory benchtop pH meter, 4 portable pH meters, a urine reagent strip, and pH paper. The pH of each aliquot was measured within 4 hours of collection by an evaluator unaware of the aliquot's origin.To assess reproducibility, the coefficient of variation for each pH measurement device was calculated. To determine which device was most accurate, the degree of agreement among the different devices was assessed in comparison with the benchtop pH meter, which was considered the reference method.

Results—3 of the 4 portable pH meters had nearly perfect agreement with the reference method. The reagent strip and pH paper had moderate to poor agreement with the reference method.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Urine pH measurements should be made by use of a portable or benchtop pH meter when accurate measurements are crucial for diagnosis or treatment. Reagent strips and pH papers are useful in obtaining pH approximations but are not recommended when accurate measurements of urine pH are required.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association