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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of 8 days of light to heavy exercise on gastric ulcer development in horses and determine the efficacy of omeprazole paste in preventing gastric ulceration.

Design—Randomized, controlled, multicenter clinical trial.

Animals—102 horses with normal-appearing gastric mucosa on endoscopic examination that were in light to heavy training.

Procedures—Horses at 4 trial locations were allocated into replicates and sham dosed orally (empty syringe) or treated with a paste formulation of omeprazole (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/ lb], PO) once daily for 8 days. Training regimens varied among locations and included early training for western performance events; walking, trotting, and cantering in a mechanical exerciser; and race training (2 locations). Prevalences of gastric ulceration at the completion of the 8-day treatment period were compared between groups.

Results—At the end of the 8-day treatment period, the proportion of omeprazole-treated horses free from gastric ulceration (88%) was significantly higher than the proportion of sham-dosed horses free from gastric ulceration (27%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results showed that horses in light to heavy training for as short as 8 days were at risk of developing gastric ulcers and that administration of omeprazole paste decreased the incidence of gastric ulcers.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether omeprazole oral paste administered at a dosage of 0.5 or 1 mg/kg (0.23 or 0.45 mg/lb), PO, every 24 hours would effectively prevent the recurrence of gastric ulcers in horses in race training.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—135 horses.

Procedures—Horses with gastric ulcers were treated with omeprazole at a dosage of 4 mg/kg (1.8 mg/lb), PO, every 24 hours for 28 days. Horses in the dose selection portion of the study were sham dose treated or received 0.5 or 1 mg of omeprazole/kg, PO, every 24 hours for an additional 28 days. Horses in the dose confirmation portion of the study were sham dose treated or received 1 mg of omeprazole/kg, PO, every 24 hours for an additional 28 days. Gastric ulcers were scored before and after the preventive phase of the study (day 28 to day 56) via gastroscopy, and ulcer scores were compared.

Results—Sham–dose-treated horses and horses receiving 0.5 mg of omeprazole/kg had significantly higher ulcer scores than did horses receiving 1 mg of omeprazole/kg. There was a significant difference between the proportion of horses receiving 1 mg of omeprazole/kg (38/48 [79%]) that remained ulcer free and the proportion of sham–dose-treated horses (7/44 [16%]) that remained ulcer free.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Omeprazole oral paste administered at a dosage of 1 mg/kg, PO, every 24 hours for 28 days was effective for prevention of recurrence of gastric ulcers in horses in race training. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:1685–1688)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the minimal effective dosage of omeprazole oral paste for the prevention of naturally occurring ulcers in horses starting race training.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—175 horses.

Procedure—Horses in the dose selection portion of the study were sham dose treated or received 1 mg (0.45 mg/lb) or 2 mg (0.9 mg/lb) of omeprazole/kg, PO, every 24 hours for 28 days or 4 mg of omeprazole/ kg (1.8 mg/lb; loading dose), PO, every 24 hours for 4 days, then 1 or 2 mg of omeprazole/kg, PO, every 24 hours for 24 days. Horses in the dose confirmation portion of the study were sham dose treated or received 1 mg of omeprazole/kg, PO, every 24 hours for 28 days. Gastric ulcer scores at the beginning and end of the study were compared.

Results—Sham–dose-treated horses had significantly higher ulcer scores than did horses treated with any of the omeprazole dosages evaluated. Among horses treated with omeprazole, there was no significant interaction of dose (1 or 2 mg/kg) and loading dose; therefore, the lowest effective dose (1 mg/kg) was evaluated in the dose confirmation portion of the study. In the dose confirmation study, 4 of 39 (10%) sham–dose-treated horses remained ulcer free, which was significantly different from the proportion of horses (31/38 [82%]) receiving 1 mg of omeprazole/ kg that remained ulcer free.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that omeprazole administered at a dosage of 1 mg/kg, PO, every 24 hours for 28 days was effective for prevention of gastric ulcers in horses starting race training. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:1681–1684)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association