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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report the rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) after clean-contaminated and dirty gastrointestinal surgery in dogs and cats that did and did not receive incisional infiltration of Nocita and report the bacteria isolated.

ANIMALS

Client-owned dogs (n = 211) and cats (78).

METHODS

Records of dogs and cats that underwent gastrointestinal surgery at the Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Florida Small Animal Hospital between July 1, 2020, and April 1, 2023, were reviewed for surgical procedures, presence of preoperative septic peritonitis, use of Nocita, perioperative antibiotics administered, postoperative antibiotic use, SSI development postoperatively, and aerobic bacteria isolated.

RESULTS

7 of 124 (5.6%) dogs that received Nocita and 9 of 87 (10.2%) that did not receive Nocita developed an SSI. No dogs presenting with septic peritonitis and given Nocita (n = 5) developed an SSI. Two of 55 (3.6%) cats that received Nocita and 1 of 23 (4%) that did not receive Nocita developed an SSI. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli was the most common aerobic bacteria isolated from SSIs (n = 3), and MDR bacteria were isolated commonly from both groups (4).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Use of Nocita for gastrointestinal surgery in dogs and cats is not associated with higher rates of SSI than published rates of SSI after gastrointestinal surgery. Use of Nocita in dogs with preoperative septic peritonitis is not associated with the development of SSI. MDR bacteria are commonly isolated via culture from both dogs that received Nocita and those that did not.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the clinical presentation, novel surgical approach, and outcome of a dog diagnosed with chondro-osseous respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma (COREAH).

ANIMAL

5-year-old castrated male Yorkshire Terrier.

CLINICAL PRESENTATION, PROGRESSION, AND PROCEDURES

The dog was presented with chronic upper respiratory noise, congestion, facial swelling, ocular discharge, and an abscess on the nasal bridge. Two CT scans were performed 4 months apart. The CT scans yielded similar results: cyst-like nasal masses with severely destructive bilateral rhinitis with extensive polyostotic bony lysis. A dorsal rhinotomy with a turbinectomy and debridement of the nasal cavity were performed. A poorly defined but extensive lesion was found occupying the entirety of the left frontal sinus as well as the nasal cavity.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Histopathology revealed a mass consistent with COREAH. The dog recovered well from surgery, except for self-limiting subcutaneous emphysema, and 3 weeks postoperatively was reportedly doing well, with mild nasal discharge. Stridor, nasal discharge, and sneezing episodes were reported postoperatively; however, these were improved. At 18 months postoperatively, the dog died from uncontrolled seizures while hospitalized for suspected acute hemorrhagic diarrhea syndrome at a different hospital.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

COREAH should be considered a potential cause of destructive bilateral rhinitis and bony lysis in dogs. Dorsal rhinotomy can be a surgical treatment for dogs with possible COREAH with acceptable outcome, though complete remission of clinical signs may not be achieved. This is the first clinical description of COREAH in a dog.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the frequency of abnormal findings on digital rectal examination (DRE) performed during physical examinations at a tertiary referral veterinary hospital, to establish what abnormal findings are most common and whether they impact diagnostic and treatment plans, and to assess whether patient signalment or admitting service influences the frequency of abnormalities.

ANIMALS

Client-owned dogs (n = 440).

METHODS

Veterinarians performed DREs on dogs as part of a physical examination. Patient signalment and DRE findings were recorded in a standardized survey. Findings were deemed normal or abnormal and described. Whether the findings changed the diagnostic or treatment plan was also recorded.

RESULTS

Abnormalities were detected on DRE in 160 of 440 (36%) dogs. Changes to the diagnostic plan occurred in 41 of 160 (26%) cases when an abnormality was found. Changes to the treatment plan occurred in 20 of 160 (12.5%) cases when an abnormality was found. Age (P = .2), sex (P = .9), and breed (P = 1) did not significantly influence the frequency of abnormal findings. Abnormal findings were significantly more common in dogs presenting to the emergency service than elective services (P = .005).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Among dogs presenting to a tertiary veterinary hospital, abnormalities found on DRE are common and change the diagnostic plan in 1 out of 4 dogs and treatment plan in 1 out of 8 dogs. This study supports the continued practice of DREs in dogs, especially in emergency settings, regardless of signalment.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association