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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the ability of ABT-116 (a proprietary antagonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1) administered at 2 doses to attenuate lameness in dogs with experimentally induced urate synovitis.

Animals—8 purpose-bred mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—In a 4-way crossover study, dogs orally received each of low-dose ABT-116 treatment (LDA; 10 mg/kg), high-dose ABT-116 treatment (HDA; 30 mg/kg), firocoxib (5 mg/kg), and no treatment (nontreatment) once a day for 2 days, in a randomly assigned order. Synovitis was induced on the second day of each treatment period by intra-articular injection of either stifle joint with sodium urate, alternating between joints for each treatment period, beginning with the left stifle joint. Ground reaction forces, clinical lameness scores, and rectal temperature were assessed before the injection (baseline) and at various points afterward.

Results—Lameness scores at the 2-, 6-, and 12-hour assessment points were higher than baseline scores for HDA and nontreatment, whereas scores at the 2- and 6-hour points were higher than baseline scores for LDA. For firocoxib, there was no difference from baseline scores in lameness scores at any point. Compared with baseline values, peak vertical force and vertical impulse were lower at 2 and 6 hours for HDA and nontreatment and at 2 hours for LDA. No changes in these values were evident for firocoxib. The HDA or LDA resulted in higher rectal temperatures than did treatment with firocoxib or nothing, but those temperatures did not differ among treatments.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—HDA had no apparent effect on sodium urate–induced lameness; LDA did attenuate the lameness but not as completely as firocoxib treatment. High rectal temperature is an adverse effect of oral ABT-116 administration that may be of clinical concern.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

The accuracy of the Doppler technique for indirect systolic blood pressure measurement was assessed in 16 anesthetized cats. Eight cats were anesthetized with isoflurane and 8 were anesthetized with halothane. Anesthetic depth and mode of ventilation were varied to obtain a wide range of arterial blood pressure. A Doppler transducer was placed on the palmer surface of the left forelimb over the common digital branch of the radial artery to detect blood flow, and a blood pressure monitoring cuff with a width 37% the limb circumference was placed half way between the elbow and the carpus. To enable direct arterial pressure measurements, the left femoral artery was catheterized and the blood pressure waveforms recorded simultaneously.

Systolic blood pressure measured by use of the Doppler ultrasonic technique was significantly lower than that obtained from the femoral artery catheter. Using linear regression, we determined a clinically useful calibration adjustment for Doppler indirect blood pressure measurement in cats: femoral systolic pressure = Doppler systolic pressure + 14 mm of Hg.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the ability of perzinfotel (an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist) and a proprietary phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor to attenuate lameness in dogs with sodium urate (SU)–induced synovitis.

Animals—8 adult dogs.

Procedures—A blinded 4-way crossover study was performed. Dogs received perzinfotel (10 mg/kg), a proprietary PLA2 inhibitor (10 mg/kg), carprofen (4.4 mg/kg; positive control treatment), or no treatment (negative control treatment). On the fourth day after initiation of treatment, synovitis was induced via intra-articular injection of SU 1 hour before administration of the last treatment dose. Ground reaction forces were measured and clinical lameness evaluations were performed before (baseline [time 0]) and 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 25 hours after SU injection. There was a 21-day washout period between subsequent treatments. Data were analyzed via repeated-measures ANOVAs.

Results—Peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI) values for negative control and perzinfotel treatments were significantly lower at 2 and 4 hours, compared with baseline values. Values for PVF and VI for the PLA2 inhibitor and positive control treatments did not differ from baseline values at any time points. Between-treatment comparisons revealed significantly higher PVF and VI values for the positive control treatment than for the negative control and perzinfotel treatments at 2 and 4 hours. Values for VI were higher for PLA2 inhibitor treatment than for negative control treatment at 2 hours.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Perzinfotel did not significantly alter SU–induced lameness. The proprietary PLA2 inhibitor attenuated lameness but not as completely as did carprofen.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Of 82 dogs with thyroid carcinoma seen between January 1981 and October 1989, 20 had freely movable tumors without evidence of metastasis and were treated with surgical excision alone. Uncensored mean and median survival times for these 20 dogs were both 20.5 months. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, which censors for nontumor-related deaths and dogs lost to follow-up, indicated that median survival time was greater than 36 months. Seven dogs died of tumor-related causes: 2 died because of metastasis or local recurrence of the tumor, 5 died of treatment-related complications (eg, laryngeal paralysis, hypocalcemia, tracheostomy complications). Eight dogs died of unrelated causes; 1 dog was lost to follow-up at 26 months after surgery; 3 dogs were alive 19, 24, and 26 months after surgery. Cause of death could not be determined in the remaining dog. Long-term survival is possible following surgical removal of mobile thyroid carcinomas in dogs.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Twelve resected canine gallbladders (in vitro) and the gallbladder in each of 14 dogs (in vivo) were ultrasonographically examined. Gallbladder volume was calculated from ultrasonographically measured geometric dimensions, using 4 volumetric model formulas: cone, ellipse, biplanar ellipse, and prolate ellipse. Calculated volume was compared with true gallbladder volume, as measured by water displacement. All examined models for calculation of gallbladder volume were closely associated with true gallbladder volume (P < 0.005), and all models provided accurate predictions of true gallbladder volume (r2 > 0.80). Calculated volumes can be corrected mathematically by use of the regression coefficient and constant for each model. Body weight was not significantly associated with gallbladder volume in any of the models considered. Use of ultrasonography to accurately measure gallbladder volume could be combined with synthetic cholecystokinin-stimulated gallbladder emptying to provide information about biliary function and patency in icteric animals. Such information could aid the clinical decision between surgical or medical treatment. Correction of calculated volumes would not be necessary in association with induced emptying studies, because volume change is more important than absolute volume.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

One hundred twenty-nine dogs with histologically confirmed malignant tumors were used in a prospective study to determine the toxicity of the new dihydroxyquinone derivative of anthracene, mitoxantrone, which was administered iv at 21-day intervals at dosages ranging from 2.5 to 5 mg/m2 body surface area. Each dog was evaluated for signs of toxicosis for 3 weeks after each dose was administered or until the dog died, whichever came first. The number of dogs in each evaluation period were as follows: 1 dose (n = 129), 2 doses (n = 82), 3 doses (n = 43), 4 doses (n = 26), 5 doses (n = 19), 6 doses (n = 9), 7 doses (n = 6), 8 doses (n = 5), 9 doses (n = 3), and 10 doses (n = 1). The most common signs of toxicosis were vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, and sepsis secondary to myelosuppression. None of the dogs died of complications resulting from mitoxantrone treatment. Dogs with signs of toxicosis during the 21-day interval from administration of the first dose of mitoxantrone were 95 times (P = 0.003) more likely to develop signs of toxicosis during the 21-day interval from the second dose of mitoxantrone. Similarly, dogs that developed signs of toxicosis during the 21-day interval from the administration of the second dose were 34 times (P < 0.001) more likely to develop signs of toxicosis during the 21-day interval from the administration of the third dose. With each 1 mg/m2 increase in mitoxantrone, the odds of developing signs of toxicosis increased by 5.9 fold (P < 0.001). The performance status (modified Karnofsky performance scheme) of each dog was not adversely affected to a significant extent by mitoxantrone-induced toxicosis until the fifth dose (P = 0.0008). Cardiac toxicosis was not detected. Mitoxantrone was also administered iv to 4 clinically normal dogs, at a dosage of 5 mg/m2 of body surface area, a decrease in the neutrophil count was seen, with the nadir occurring on day 10 (mean ± sem: 1,159 ± 253 cells/μl; range, 480 to 1,680 cells/μl). Tumor-bearing dogs did not seem to have the same degree of myelosuppression (mean ± sem, 6,263 ± 1,230 cells/μl; range, 228 to 18,600 cells/μl).

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association