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  • Author or Editor: C. H. Lamar x
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SUMMARY

The effect of ingested epidermal growth factor (egf) on the small intestinal mucosa of conventionally weaned pigs was determined. At 21 days of age, 39 pigs were randomly distributed into suckling and weaned treatment groups that were administered 124 μg of egf, 372 μg of egf, or the dosing compound daily. Fecal water content was determined daily. On postweaning days 0, 3, 6, and 9, representative pigs from each group were euthanatized, and jejunal mucosa samples were collected for determination of villus-to-crypt ratio, total protein content, disaccharidase activities, and microbiological populations. At postweaning day 3, the 372-μg dose of egf significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased jejunal lactase and sucrase activities in the weaned pigs. Increased lactase activity was not greater than that of the suckling pig controls, whereas sucrase activity was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher than that of the suckling pig controls. Significant changes were not observed in villus-to-crypt ratio, mucosal protein content, or disaccharidase activities on other collection days.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

The effects of the corticosteroid 6-α-methylprednisolone acetate on normal equine articular cartilage were evaluated, using the middle carpal joint in 4 clinically normal young horses. One middle carpal joint of each horse was injected 3 times with 100 mg of 6-α-methylprednisolone acetate, at 14-day intervals. The opposite middle carpal joint (control) was injected with 2.5 ml of lactated Ringer solution at the same intervals. Effects were studied until 8 weeks after the first injection. Evaluation included clinical and radiographic examination, and gross, microscopic, and biochemical evaluation of joint tissues.

Horses remained clinically normal during the study, and significant radiographic changes were not observed. Safranin-0 matrix staining intensity and uronic acid content were significantly (P < 0.05) lower and hydroxyproline content was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in articular cartilage of corticosteroid-injected joints vs control joints.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Three doses of sodium monoiodoacetate (mia) were used to induce degenerative changes in articular cartilage in middle carpal joints of horses. Twelve young (2- to 5-year-old) horses, free of lameness, were randomly allotted to 3 groups. One middle carpal joint of each horse was injected with 0.9% NaCl solution (control joint). The contralateral middle carpal joint was injected with 0.09 mg of MlA/kg of body weight (group 1); 0.12 mg/kg (group 2); or 0.16 mg/kg (group 3). After mia administration, horses were allowed ad libitum exercise in a 2-acre paddock for 12 weeks. At the end of the study, gross and microscopic tissue changes were evaluated and biochemical analyses of articular cartilage were done. Grossly, diffuse partial thickness articular cartilage lesions were observed in group-2 (n = 2) and group-3 (n = 4) horses, but not in group-1 horses. Articular cartilage uronic acid content was significantly (P < 0.03) decreased in all mia-injected joints, compared with controls. Articular cartilage matrix staining with safranin-O was decreased in 3 of 4 mia- injected joints of group-1 horses and in all mia-injected joints of group-2 and group-3 horses, compared with controls (P < 0.06). Microscopic degenerative changes in articular cartilage were not significantly different between mia-injected and control joints in group-1 horses, but were increased (P<0.06) in all MlA-injected joints of group-2 and group-3 horses, compared with controls. Qualitatively, decreased matrix staining and degenerative changes were more severe in group-3 horses. On the basis of articular cartilage gross and microscopic changes, as well as biochemical changes, 0.12 mg of mia/kg injected intra-articularly was determined to induce moderate degrees of articular cartilage degeneration. This model of chemically induced articular cartilage injury could be useful for evaluating treatment effects of anti-arthritic drugs in horses.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research