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  • Author or Editor: C. E. Uboh x
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Abstract

Objective—To compare pharmacokinetics of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) following IV, intra-articular (IA), and IM administration and determine its effect on plasma concentrations of hydrocortisone and cortisone.

Animals—6 Thoroughbreds.

Procedures—TA (0.04 mg/kg) was administered IV, IM, or IA, and plasma TA, hydrocortisone, and cortisone concentrations were determined.

Results—IV administration of TA was fitted to a 2-compartment model. Median distribution half-life was 0.50 hours (range, 0.24 to 0.67 hours); elimination half-life was 6.1 hours (range, 5.0 to 6.4 hours). Transfer half-life of TA from joint to plasma was 5.2 hours (range, 0.49 to 73 hours); elimination half-life was 23.8 hours (range, 18.9 to 32.2 hours). Maximum plasma concentration following IA administration was 2.0 ng/mL (range, 0.94 to 2.5 ng/mL), and was attained at 10 hours (range, 8 to 12 hours). Maximum plasma concentration following IM administration was 0.34 ng/mL (range, 0.20 to 0.48 ng/mL) and was attained at 13.0 hours (range, 12 to 16 hours); concentration was still quantifiable at 360 hours. Hydrocortisone plasma concentrations were significantly different from baseline within 0.75, 2, and 1 hours after IV, IA, and IM administration, respectively, and remained significantly different from baseline at 96 and 264 hours for IV and IA administration. Following IM administration of TA, plasma concentrations of hydrocortisone did not recover to baseline concentrations by 360 hours.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Pharmacokinetics of TA and related changes in hydrocortisone were described following IV, IA, and IM administration. A single administration of TA has profound effects on secretion of endogenous hydrocortisone.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To examine, in horses, the disposition and excretion of the active metabolite 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6MNA) of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory prodrug nabumetone.

Design

Pharmacokinetic analysis of 6MNA after oral administration of nabumetone and IV administration of 6MNA.

Procedure

Using a crossover design, 5 horses were orally administered 3.7 mg of nabumetone/kg of body weight. After a 3-week washout period, 4 horses were administered 2.5 mg of 6MNA/kg, IV.

Results

Absorption of nabumetone from the gastrointestinal tract and its metabolism to 6MNA had a median appearance half-life of 0.88 hour. The elimination half-life was 11 hours. Area under the plasma concentration time curve for 6MNA after oral administration of nabumetone was 120.6 mg/h/L. A dose of 2.5 mg/kg of 6MNA administered IV resulted in plasma concentration nearly equivalent to that induced by the orally administered dose. Disposition of 6MNA was modeled as a one-compartment, first-order elimination. The area under the plasma concentration time curve for IV administration of 6MNA was 117.0 mg/h/L, and the specific volume of distribution was 0.247 L/kg. The distribution half-life and the elimination half-life were 0.56 and 7.90 hours, respectively. Percentage of total dose recovered in urine for the 36-hour collection period after the oral and IV administrations was 7.4 and 5.3%, respectively.

Conclusions

Metabolism of nabumetone to 6MNA, as reported in other species, also occurs in horses. There were a number of additional metabolites of nabumetone in urine that could not be fully identified and characterized. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:517–521)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics of methylprednisolone (MP) and develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model of the related changes in plasma concentrations of endogenous hydrocortisone (HYD) and cortisone (COR) following intra-articular administration of methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) in horses.

Animals—6 Thoroughbreds.

Procedures—In each horse, 200 mg of MPA was injected intrasynovially into a carpal joint, and plasma MP, HYD, and COR concentrations were determined via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

Results—A 5-compartment pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model was used to describe the concatenated changes in the plasma concentrations of MP, HYD, and COR and to estimate the instantaneous rate of endogenous HYD production. The median transfer half-life (t1/2t) of methylprednisolone from the joint to plasma and elimination half-life (t1/2e) from plasma were 1.7 and 19.2 hours, respectively. Maximum plasma concentration of methylprednisolone was 7.26 ± 3.3 ng/mL at 8 hours, which decreased to 0.11 ± 0.08 ng/mL at 144 hours after injection. At 3 hours after MPA administration, plasma COR and HYD concentrations were significantly decreased from baseline values (from 2.9 ± 0.28 ng/mL to 2.10 ± 1.0 ng/mL and from 61.1 ± 18.9 ng/mL to 25.7 ± 12.1 ng/mL, respectively).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The sensitivity of the analytic method used allowed complete description of the related kinetics of MP, HYD, and COR following intra-articular administration of MPA. A single intra-articular administration of MPA profoundly affected the secretion of HYD and COR in horses; secretion of endogenous corticosteroids remained suppressed for as long as 240 hours after injection.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Concentration of sulfamethazine was measured in plasma and tissues (fat, liver, kidney, spleen, lungs, and skeletal muscle) of pigs given the drug iv and po. The plasma concentration vs time curve was best described by a 2-compartment model, with a distribution half-life of 0.46 hour and an elimination halflife of 16.9 hours. Bioavailability after oral administration was 85.8 ± 5.3%.

The tissue and plasma sulfamethazine concentration vs time data were used to develop a multicompartment pharmacokinetic model of sulfamethazine disposition in pigs. Plasma and tissue concentrations of sulfamethazine in pigs were measured at various intervals after multiple oral doses of sulfamethazine, and were compared to concentrations predicted by the model. Model predictions for tissue concentrations of sulfamethazine after addition of the drug to feed (110 μg/g of feed for 98 days; 550 μg/g for 30 days) were compared to results from other studies. The model accurately predicted the number of days for sulfamethazine concentration to fall below 0.1 μg of tissue/g (0.1 ppm, the tolerated concentration) in various tissues.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine pharmacokinetics and excretion of phenytoin in horses.

Animals—6 adult horses.

Procedure—Using a crossover design, phenytoin was administered (8.8 mg/kg of body weight, IV and PO) to 6 horses to determine bioavailability (F). Phenytoin also was administered orally twice daily for 5 days to those same 6 horses to determine steadystate concentrations and excretion patterns. Blood and urine samples were collected for analysis.

Results—Mean (± SD) elimination half-life following a single IV or PO administration was 12.6 ± 2.8 and 13.9 ± 6.3 hours, respectively, and was 11.2 ± 4.0 hours following twice-daily administration for 5 days. Values for F ranged from 14.5 to 84.7%. Mean peak plasma concentration (Cmax) following single oral administration was 1.8 ± 0.68 µg/ml. Steady-state plasma concentrations following twice-daily administration for 5 days was 4.0 ± 1.8 µg/ml. Of the 12.0 ± 5.4% of the drug excreted during the 36-hour collection period, 0.78 ± 0.39% was the parent drug phenytoin, and 11.2 ± 5.3% was 5-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin (p-HPPH). Following twice-daily administration for 5 days, phenytoin was quantified in plasma and urine for up to 72 and 96 hours, respectively, and p-HPPH was quantified in urine for up to 144 hours after administration. This excretion pattern was not consistent in all horses.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Variability in F, terminal elimination-phase half-life, and Cmax following single or multiple oral administration of phenytoin was considerable. This variability makes it difficult to predict plasma concentrations in horses after phenytoin administration. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:483–489)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare the pharmacokinetics of penicillin G and procaine in racehorses following IM administration of penicillin G procaine (PGP) with pharmacokinetics following IM administration of penicillin G potassium and procaine hydrochloride (PH).

Animals—6 healthy adult mares.

Procedure—Horses were treated with PGP (22,000 units of penicillin G/kg of body weight, IM) and with penicillin G potassium (22,000 U/kg, IM) and PH (1.55 mg/kg, IM). A minimum of 3 weeks was allowed to elapse between drug treatments. Plasma and urine penicillin G and procaine concentrations were measured by use of high-pressure liquid chromatography.

Results—Median elimination phase half-lives of penicillin G were 24.7 and 12.9 hours, respectively, after administration of PGP and penicillin G potassium. Plasma penicillin G concentration 24 hours after administration of penicillin G potassium and PH was not significantly different from concentration 24 hours after administration of PGP. Median elimination phase halflife of procaine following administration of PGP (15.6 hours) was significantly longer than value obtained after administration of penicillin G potassium and PH (1 hour).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that IM administration of penicillin G potassium will result in plasma penicillin G concentrations for 24 hours after drug administration comparable to those obtained with administration of PGP. Clearance of procaine from plasma following administration of penicillin G potassium and PH was rapid, compared with clearance following administration of PGP. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:811–815)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research