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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine plasma tramadol concentrations in cats following a single dose of oral and transdermal formulations and the pharmacokinetics for and the concentration of tramadol in the transdermal formulation.

ANIMALS

8 healthy client-owned domestic shorthair cats.

PROCEDURES

1 cat was orally administered 1 dose of tramadol (2 mg/kg), and 7 cats received 1 dose of a proprietary compounded tramadol gel product (median actual dose, 2.8 mg/kg) applied to their inner pinnae. Plasma tramadol concentrations were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry at fixed times over 24 hours.

RESULTS

Plasma tramadol concentrations were undetectable or much lower (range, < 1 to 4.3 ng/mL) following application of the transdermal formulation, compared with those following oral administration (maximum plasma tramadol concentration, 261.3 ng/mL [at 4 hours]). Tramadol pharmacokinetics for the transdermal formulation could not be determined. Tramadol concentrations of the transdermal gel product exceeded the estimated label dose in all analyzed gel samples, with concentrations greater than the 90% to 110% United States Pharmacopeia standard for compounded drugs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Application of 1 dose of the proprietary transdermal formulation did not yield clinically relevant plasma tramadol concentrations in cats. Although this proprietary formulation is currently available to prescribing veterinarians, it should be used with caution.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate clinical efficacy of hydrocodone-acetaminophen and tramadol for treatment of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO).

ANIMALS 50 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Standardized anesthetic and surgical protocols were followed. Each patient was randomly assigned to receive either tramadol hydrochloride (5 to 7 mg/kg, PO, q 8 h; tramadol group) or hydrocodone bitartrate–acetaminophen (0.5 to 0.6 mg of hydrocodone/kg, PO, q 8 h; hydrocodone group) for analgesia after surgery. The modified Glasgow composite measure pain scale was used to assess signs of postoperative pain at predetermined intervals by an investigator who was blinded to treatment group. Scoring commenced with the second dose of the assigned study analgesic. Pain scores and rates of treatment failure (ie, dogs requiring rescue analgesia according to a predetermined protocol) were compared statistically between groups.

RESULTS 12 of 42 (29%; 5/19 in the hydrocodone-acetaminophen group and 7/23 in the tramadol group) dogs required rescue analgesic treatment on the basis of pain scores. Median pain score for the hydrocodone group was significantly lower than that of the tramadol group 2 hours after the second dose of study analgesic. The 2 groups had similar pain scores at all other time points.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Overall, differences in pain scores between dogs that received hydrocodone-acetaminophen or tramadol were minor. The percentage of dogs with treatment failure in both groups was considered unacceptable.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of hydrocodone (delivered in combination with acetaminophen) and tramadol in dogs undergoing tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO).

ANIMALS 50 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive tramadol hydrochloride (5 to 7 mg/kg, PO, q 8 h; tramadol group) or hydrocodone bitartrate–acetaminophen (0.5 to 0.6 mg of hydrocodone/kg, PO, q 8 h; hydrocodone group) following TPLO with standard anesthetic and surgical protocols. Blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis of study drugs and their metabolites over an 8-hour period beginning after the second dose of the study medication.

RESULTS The terminal half-life, maximum serum concentration, and time to maximum serum concentration for tramadol following naïve pooled modeling were 1.56 hours, 155.6 ng/mL, and 3.90 hours, respectively. Serum concentrations of the tramadol metabolite O-desmethyltramadol (M1) were low. For hydrocodone, maximum serum concentration determined by naïve pooled modeling was 7.90 ng/mL, and time to maximum serum concentration was 3.47 hours. The terminal half-life for hydrocodone was 15.85 hours, but was likely influenced by delayed drug absorption in some dogs and may not have been a robust estimate. Serum concentrations of hydromorphone were low.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The pharmacokinetics of tramadol and metabolites were similar to those in previous studies. Serum tramadol concentrations varied widely, and concentrations of the active M1 metabolite were low. Metabolism of hydrocodone to hydromorphone in dogs was poor. Further study is warranted to assess variables that affect metabolism and efficacy of these drugs in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of oral administration of robenacoxib on inhibition of anterior chamber paracentesis (ACP)-induced breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier (BAB) and assess whether robenacoxib can cross an intact BAB in healthy cats.

ANIMALS 12 healthy adult domestic shorthair cats.

PROCEDURES Cats received robenacoxib (6-mg tablet in a treat, PO; n = 6) or a control treatment (treat without any drug, PO; 6) once daily for 3 days, beginning 1 day before ACP. One eye of each cat served as an untreated control, whereas the other underwent ACP, during which a 30-gauge needle was used to aspirate 100 μL of aqueous humor for determination of robenacoxib concentration. Both eyes of each cat underwent anterior chamber fluorophotometry at 0 (immediately before), 6, 24, and 48 hours after ACP. Fluorescein concentration and percentage fluorescein increase were used to assess extent of ACP-induced BAB breakdown and compared between cats that did and did not receive robenacoxib.

RESULTS Extent of BAB breakdown induced by ACP did not differ significantly between cats that did and did not receive robenacoxib. Low concentrations of robenacoxib were detected in the aqueous humor (mean, 5.32 ng/mL; range, 0.9 to 16 ng/mL) for 5 of the 6 cats that received the drug.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that oral administration of robenacoxib did not significantly decrease extent of BAB breakdown in healthy cats. Detection of low robenacoxib concentrations in the aqueous humor for most treated cats indicated that the drug can cross an intact BAB.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate pharmacokinetics of cefazolin after IV injection of cefazolin (22 mg/kg) and after simultaneous IV and IM injections of cefazolin (total dose, 44 mg/kg) to dogs.

ANIMALS 12 adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES Dogs (6/group) were assigned to receive a single injection of cefazolin (IV group; 22 mg/kg, IV) or simultaneous injections (IV + IM group; 22 mg/kg, IV, and 22 mg/kg, IM). Interstitial fluid was collected over a 5-hour period by use of ultrafiltration probes for pharmacokinetic analysis.

RESULTS Mean cefazolin concentration in the interstitial fluid at 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, and 5 hours after injection was 39.6, 29.1, 21.2, 10.3, 6.4, and 2.7 μg/mL, respectively, for the IV group and 38.3, 53.3, 46.4, 31.7, 19.1, and 8.9 μg/mL, respectively, for the IV + IM group. Mean area under the concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity, maximum concentration, half-life, and time to maximum concentration was 74.99 and 154.16 h·μg/mL, 37.3 and 51.5 μg/mL, 0.96 and 1.11 hours, and 1.28 and 1.65 hours, respectively, for the IV and IV + IM groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Cefazolin concentrations in interstitial fluid of dogs were maintained at > 4 μg/mL for 4 hours after a single IV injection and for 5 hours after simultaneous IV and IM injections. Therefore, simultaneous IV and IM administration of cefazolin 30 to 60 minutes before surgery should provide interstitial fluid concentrations effective against the most common commensal organisms (Staphylococcus spp and Streptococcus spp) on the skin of dogs for surgical procedures lasting ≤ 4 hours.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To quantify plasma concentrations and determine adverse ocular, renal, or hepatic effects associated with repeated topical ophthalmic application of 0.1% diclofenac to healthy cats.

ANIMALS 8 healthy sexually intact male cats.

PROCEDURES A randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted. A topical formulation of 0.1% diclofenac was administered 4 times/d for 7 days to 4 cats, and artificial tear (control) solution was administered to the other 4 cats. After a 12-day washout period, cats received the other treatment. Ophthalmic examinations were performed daily. Plasma samples were obtained on days 1 and 7 for pharmacokinetic analysis. A CBC, serum biochemical analysis, urinalysis, determination of urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and determination of glomerular filtration rate were performed before the start of the study and after each 7-day treatment period.

RESULTS Mild conjunctival hyperemia was the only adverse ocular effect detected. Maximal drug concentration and area under the curve were significantly higher on day 7 than on day 1. Diclofenac-treated cats had a significantly lower glomerular filtration rate than did control-treated cats after the second but not after the first treatment period, presumably associated with iatrogenic hypovolemia.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Topical ophthalmic administration of 0.1% diclofenac was well tolerated in healthy cats, with only mild signs of ocular irritation. Detectable systemic concentrations of diclofenac were achieved with accumulation over 7 days. Systemic absorption of diclofenac may be associated with reduced glomerular filtration rate, particularly in volume-contracted animals. Topical ophthalmic 0.1% diclofenac should be used with caution in volume-contracted or systemically ill cats.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine effects of fentanyl, lidocaine, and a fentanyl-lidocaine combination on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane preventing motor movement (MACNM) in dogs.

ANIMALS 6 adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane in oxygen 3 times (1-week intervals). Baseline MACNM (MACNM-B) was determined starting 45 minutes after induction of anesthesia. Dogs then received 1 of 3 treatments IV: fentanyl (loading dose, 15 μg/kg; constant rate infusion [CRI], 6 μg/kg/h), lidocaine (loading dose, 2 mg/kg; CRI, 6 mg/kg/h), and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination at the same doses. Determination of treatment MACNM (MACNM-T) was initiated 90 minutes after start of the CRI. Venous blood samples were collected at the time of each treatment MACNM measurement for determination of plasma concentrations of fentanyl and lidocaine.

RESULTS Mean ± SEM overall MACNM-B for the 3 treatments was 2.70 ± 0.27 vol%. The MACNM decreased from MACNM-B to MACNM-T by 39%, 21%, and 55% for fentanyl, lidocaine, and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination, respectively. This decrease differed significantly among treatments. Plasma fentanyl concentration was 3.25 and 2.94 ng/mL for fentanyl and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination, respectively. Plasma lidocaine concentration was 2,570 and 2,417 ng/mL for lidocaine and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination, respectively. Plasma fentanyl and lidocaine concentrations did not differ significantly between fentanyl and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination or between lidocaine and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE CRIs of fentanyl, lidocaine, and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination at the doses used were associated with clinically important and significant decreases in the MACNM of sevoflurane in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of age on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of flunixin meglumine following IV and transdermal administration to calves.

ANIMALS 8 healthy weaned Holstein bull calves.

PROCEDURES At 2 months of age, all calves received an injectable solution of flunixin (2.2 mg/kg, IV); then, after a 10-day washout period, calves received a topical formulation of flunixin (3.33 mg/kg, transdermally). Blood samples were collected at predetermined times before and for 48 and 72 hours, respectively, after IV and transdermal administration. At 8 months of age, the experimental protocol was repeated except calves received flunixin by the transdermal route first. Plasma flunixin concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy. For each administration route, pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental methods and compared between the 2 ages. Plasma prostaglandin (PG) E2 concentration was determined with an ELISA. The effect of age on the percentage change in PGE2 concentration was assessed with repeated-measures analysis. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of flunixin on PGE2 concentration was determined by nonlinear regression.

RESULTS Following IV administration, the mean half-life, area under the plasma concentration-time curve, and residence time were lower and the mean clearance was higher for calves at 8 months of age than at 2 months of age. Following transdermal administration, the mean maximum plasma drug concentration was lower and the mean absorption time and residence time were higher for calves at 8 months of age than at 2 months of age. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of flunixin on PGE2 concentration at 8 months of age was significantly higher than at 2 months of age. Age was not associated with the percentage change in PGE2 concentration following IV or transdermal flunixin administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In calves, the clearance of flunixin at 2 months of age was slower than that at 8 months of age following IV administration. Flunixin administration to calves may require age-related adjustments to the dose and dosing interval and an extended withdrawal interval.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the injectable formulation of dexmedetomidine administered via the oral transmucosal (OTM) route to healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

6 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES

Injectable dexmedetomidine was administered IV (5 μg/kg) or via the OTM route (20 μg/kg) in a blinded, single-observer, randomized crossover study. Dogs received dexmedetomidine and a sham treatment at each administration. Serial blood samples were collected from a catheter in a saphenous vein. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and subjective sedation score were assessed for 24 hours after administration. Plasma samples were analyzed for dexmedetomidine concentrations by use of ultraperformance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry.

RESULTS

For the OTM route, the mean ± SD maximum plasma concentration was 3.8 ± 1.3 ng/mL, which was detected 73 ± 33 minutes after administration. The mean maximum concentration for the IV dose, when extrapolated to the time of administration, was 18.6 ± 3.3 ng/mL. The mean terminal-phase half-life was 152 ± 146 minutes and 36 ± 6 minutes for OTM and IV administration, respectively. After IV administration, total clearance was 8.0 ± 1.6 mL/min/kg and volume of distribution at steady state was 371 ± 72 mL/kg. Bioavailability for OTM administration of dexmedetomidine was 11.2 ± 4.5%. Peak sedation scores did not differ significantly between routes of administration. Decreases in heart rate, respiratory rate, and peak sedation score were evident sooner after IV administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

OTM administration of the injectable formulation of dexmedetomidine resulted in a similar degree of sedation and prolonged duration of action, compared with results for IV administration, despite relatively low bioavailability.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of naloxone hydrochloride in dogs following intranasal (IN) and IV administration.

ANIMALS

6 healthy adult mixed-breed dogs.

PROCEDURES

In a blinded crossover design involving 2 experimental periods separated by a washout period (minimum of 7 days), dogs were randomly assigned to receive naloxone IN (4 mg via a commercially available fixed-dose naloxone atomizer; mean ± SD dose, 0.17 ± 0.02 mg/kg) or IV (0.04 mg/kg) in the first period and then the opposite treatment in the second period. Plasma naloxone concentrations, dog behavior, heart rate, and respiratory rate were evaluated for 24 hours/period.

RESULTS

Naloxone administered IN was well absorbed after a short lag time (mean ± SD, 2.3 ± 1.4 minutes). Mean maximum plasma concentration following IN and IV administration was 9.3 ± 2.5 ng/mL and 18.8 ± 3.9 ng/mL, respectively. Mean time to maximum concentration following IN administration was 22.5 ± 8.2 minutes. Mean terminal half-life after IN and IV administration was 47.4 ± 6.7 minutes and 37.0 ± 6.7 minutes, respectively. Mean bioavailability of naloxone administered IN was 32 ± 13%. There were no notable changes in dog behavior, heart rate, or respiratory rate following naloxone administration by either route.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Use of a naloxone atomizer for IN naloxone administration in dogs may represent an effective alternative to IV administration in emergency situations involving opioid exposure. Future studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of IN naloxone administration in dogs with opioid intoxication, including a determination of effective doses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research