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  • Author or Editor: Bruno B. Chomel x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess the role of Bartonella spp in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) by determining detection rates for the organism by serologic testing and microbial culture of blood samples for Bartonella spp in cats with CRS and control cats (cats with other nasal diseases, cats with systemic illnesses, and healthy cats).

Design—Prospective case-control study.

Animals—19 cats with CRS, 10 cats with other nasal diseases, 15 cats with systemic illness, and 15 healthy cats.

Procedures—Serologic testing for Bartonella clarridgeiae and Bartonella henselae and microbial culture of blood samples were conducted in all cats. In cats with CRS and cats with other nasal diseases, a nasal biopsy specimen was submitted, when available, for tissue PCR assay to detect Bartonella spp.

Results—9 of 19 cats with CRS had positive results for serologic testing for 1 or both Bartonella spp; whereas, 4 of 10 cats with other nasal diseases, 2 of 15 cats with systemic diseases, and 4 of 15 healthy cats had positive results for serologic testing to detect Bartonella spp. These values did not differ significantly among groups. Microbial culture of blood samples yielded B henselae in 1 cat with a nasopharyngeal abscess. The PCR assay for Bartonella spp in nasal tissues yielded negative results for 9 of 9 cats with CRS and 5 of 5 cats with other nasal diseases.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A role for Bartonella spp in the pathogenesis of CRS in cats was not supported by results of this study.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine seroprevalence of antibodies to Bartonella vinsonii subsp berkhoffiiand risk factors for seropositivity among working dogs owned by the US government.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—1,872 dogs.

Procedure—An ELISA was used to detect antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii.

Results—Antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii were detected in 162 dogs (8.7%; 95% confidence interval, 7.4 to 10.0%). Dogs living in the southeast, plains states, southwest, and south-central were significantly more likely to be seropositive than were dogs living in other regions of the United States. German Shepherd-type dogs were significantly less likely to be seropositive than were dogs of other breeds, and dogs entering training programs or that had been rejected from a training program were significantly more likely to be seropositive than were dogs used for narcotics detection and dogs trained to patrol or detect explosives. Dogs used by the border patrol or Federal Aviation Administration were more likely to be seropositive than were dogs used by the Department of Defense or customs service. Odds that dogs would be seropositive were significantly higher for dogs stationed in the southern United States, the northeastern United States, or a foreign country, compared with dogs stationed in all other regions of the United States.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Overall, 8.7% of this diverse group of healthy dogs was found to be seropositive for antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii, and seropositivity rates were associated with location, suggesting either that there are multiple vectors for the organism or that the major vector for the organism depends on geographic and environmental factors. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:480–484)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the seroprevalence of antibodies against Bartonella spp in a population of sick dogs from northern California and identify potential risk factors and clinical signs associated with seropositivity.

Sample Population—Sera from 3,417 dogs.

Procedure—Via an ELISA, sera were analyzed for antibodies against Bartonella vinsonii subsp berkhoffii, Bartonella clarridgeiae, and Bartonella henselae; test results were used to classify dogs as seropositive (mean optical density value ≥ 0.350 for B henselae or ≥ 0.300 for B clarridgeiae or B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii) or seronegative. Overall, 305 dogs (102 seropositive and 203 seronegative dogs) were included in a matched case-control study.

Results—102 of 3,417 (2.99%) dogs were seropositive for ≥ 1 species of Bartonella. Of these, 36 (35.3%) had antibodies against B henselae only, 34 (33.3%) had antibodies against B clarridgeiae only, 2 (2.0%) had antibodies against B vinsonii subsp berkhoffiionly , and 30 (29.4%) had antibodies against a combination of those antigens. Compared with seronegative dogs, seropositive dogs were more likely to be herding dogs and to be female, whereas toy dogs were less likely to be seropositive. Seropositive dogs were also more likely to be lame or have arthritis-related lameness, nasal discharge or epistaxis, or splenomegaly.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Only a small percentage of dogs from which serum samples were obtained had antibodies against Bartonella spp. Breed appeared to be an important risk factor for seropositivity. Bartonella infection should be considered in dogs with clinical signs of lameness, arthritis-related lameness, nasal discharge or epistaxis, or splenomegaly. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:688–694)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives—To evaluate clinical, laboratory, and necropsy findings in dogs with infective endocarditis (IE).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—71 dogs with possible or definite IE.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for signalment, clinical features, and results of clinicopathologic testing and diagnostic imaging. Yearly incidence and the effect of variables on survival were determined by use of survival curve analysis.

Results—The overall incidence of IE was 0.05%. Most affected dogs were of large breeds, and > 75% were older than 5 years. The aortic valve was affected in 36 of the 71 (51%) dogs, and the mitral valve was affected in 59%. Lameness caused by immune-mediated polyarthritis, septic arthritis, or peripheral arterial thromboembolism was observed in 53% of the dogs. Neurologic complications were diagnosed in 17 of 71 (24%) dogs. Thromboembolic disease was suspected in 31 of 71 (44%) of dogs. The mortality rate associated with IE was 56%, and median survival time was 54 days. Factors negatively associated with survival included thrombocytopenia, high serum creatinine concentration, renal complications, and thromboembolic complications.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A diagnosis of IE should be suspected in dogs with fever, systolic or diastolic murmur, and locomotor problems. Dogs with thrombocytopenia, high serum creatinine concentration, thromboembolism, or renal complications may have a shorter survival time.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate microbiologic findings in dogs with infective endocarditis (IE) and determine whether there were differences in clinical features of disease caused by different groups of infective agents.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—71 dogs with suspected or definite IE.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for results of bacterial culture and susceptibility testing, serologic assays for vector-borne disease, and PCR testing on vegetative growths. Cases were grouped by causative organism and relationships among infectious agent group, and various hematologic, biochemical, and clinical variables were determined. Survival analyses were used to determine associations between infecting organisms and outcome.

Results—Causative bacteria were identified in 41 of 71 (58%) dogs. Gram-positive cocci were the causative agents in most (21/41; 51%) infections, with Streptococcus canis associated with 24% of infections. Gramnegative organisms were detected in 9 of the 41 (22%) dogs. Infection with Bartonella spp was detected in 6 of 31 (19%) dogs with negative results for microbial growth on blood culture. Aortic valve involvement and congestive heart failure were more frequent in dogs with endocarditis from Bartonella spp infection, and those dogs were more likely to be afebrile. Infection with Bartonella spp was negatively correlated with survival. Mitral valve involvement and polyarthritis were more frequent in dogs with streptococcal endocarditis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Streptococci were the most common cause of IE and were more likely to infect the mitral valve and be associated with polyarthritis. Dogs with IE secondary to Bartonella spp infection were often afebrile, more likely to develop congestive heart failure, rarely had mitral valve involvement, and had shorter survival times.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association