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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the usefulness of echocardiography in the diagnosis of heartworm disease in cats and to compare this modality with other tests.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—43 cats with heartworm infection that had echocardiographic examinations at 2 veterinary teaching hospitals between 1985 and 1997. Twenty-two of these 43 cats also underwent radiography of the thorax and heartworm antibody and heartworm antigen testing.

Procedure—Cats were determined to be infected with Dirofilaria immitis infection on the basis of 1 or more of the following findings: positive modified Knott or antigen test result, echocardiographic evidence of heartworm disease, or confirmation of the disease on postmortem examination. The percentage of echocardiographs in which heartworms were evident was compared with the percentage of radiographs in which pulmonary artery enlargement was evident and results of antigen or antibody tests in cats in which all tests were performed.

Results—Overall, heartworms were detectable by use of echocardiography in 17 of 43 cats, most often in the pulmonary arteries. In the 22 cats in which all tests were performed, antibody test results were positive in 18, antigen test results were positive in 12, and pulmonary artery enlargement was evident radiographically and heartworms were identifiable echocardiographically in 14. Heartworm infection was diagnosed exclusively by use of echocardiography in 5 cats in which the antigen test result was negative.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although echocardiography was less sensitive than antigen testing, it was a useful adjunctive test in cats that had negative antigen test results in which there was a suspicion of heartworm disease. The pulmonary arteries should be evaluated carefully to increase the likelihood of detection of heartworms echocardiographically. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc2001;218:66–69)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 6-year-old Siberian Husky–mix dog was examined for episodes of collapse.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination, echocardiography, abdominal ultrasonography, ECG, and thoracic computed tomography with contrast were performed and revealed a 2.5 × 2.3 × 2.0-cm mass over the pulmonic valve leaflets, resulting in moderate pulmonic stenosis. Other abnormal findings included systemic hypertension, right bundle branch block, proteinuria, and a urinary bladder mass.

Treatment and Outcome—Pulmonary arteriotomy was performed under inflow occlusion, and the mass was resected with transesophageal echocardiographic guidance and direct visualization. Results of histologic examination of the mass revealed a vascular hamartoma. Sequential follow-up examinations and telephone contacts (at 0.5, 5, and 15 months after surgery) revealed that the patient had been free from episodes of collapse since surgery. No regrowth of the mass was noted on follow-up echocardiograms, and the pulmonic stenosis had resolved, although mild to moderate pulmonary insufficiency later developed. The bladder mass was excised 15 months after the first surgery when hematuria developed, and results of histologic examination of this mass revealed a vascular hamartoma. The dog was eventually euthanized 31 months after the initial surgery for reasons that could not be directly linked to any recurrence of the pulmonary artery mass.

Clinical Relevance—Hamartomas are benign tumors that can be located in various tissues, including large arteries. Computed tomography was helpful in predicting the resectability of the intracardiac mass in this dog. Treatment with arteriotomy under inflow occlusion and mild hypothermia resulted in a favorable outcome.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the frequency of variants in the pyruvate kinase dehydrogenase 4 (PDK4) and titin (TTN) genes in a group of Doberman Pinschers with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and to determine whether there were unique clinical attributes to each variant.

ANIMALS

48 Doberman Pinschers with DCM.

PROCEDURES

Doberman Pinschers with recently diagnosed DCM were identified, and genomic DNA from each was genotyped with a PCR assay for detection of PDK4 and TTN genetic variants. Dogs were grouped on the basis of whether they had the TTN variant alone, PDK4 variant alone, both variants, or neither variant. Descriptive statistics were compiled for dog age, body weight, and left ventricular dimensions and fractional shortening and for the presence of ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias and heart failure. Results were compared across groups.

RESULTS

Of the 48 dogs, 28 had the TTN variant alone, 10 had both variants, 6 had neither variant, and 4 had the PDK4 variant alone. The mean age was younger for dogs with the PDK4 variant alone, compared with other dogs. However, the number of dogs with the PDK4 variant alone was very small, and there was an overlap in age across groups. No other meaningful differences were detected across groups, and independent genotype-phenotype relationships were not identified.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Although findings indicated that the TTN variant was most common, 6 dogs had neither variant, and this fact supported the concept of ≥ 1 other genetic contributor to DCM in Doberman Pinschers. Future studies are warranted to evaluate genotype-phenotype relationships in Doberman Pinschers with DCM.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of administration of the labeled dosage of pimobendan to dogs with furosemide-induced activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS).

Animals—12 healthy hound-type dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were allocated into 2 groups (6 dogs/group). One group received furosemide (2 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) for 10 days (days 1 to 10). The second group received a combination of furosemide (2 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) and pimobendan (0.25 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) for 10 days (days 1 to 10). To determine the effect of the medications on the RAAS, 2 urine samples/d were obtained for determination of the urinary aldosterone-to-creatinine ratio (A:C) on days 0 (baseline), 5, and 10.

Results—Mean ± SD urinary A:C increased significantly after administration of furosemide (baseline, 0.37 ± 0.14 μg/g; day 5, 0.89 ± 0.23 μg/g) or the combination of furosemide and pimobendan (baseline, 0.36 ± 0.22 μg/g; day 5, 0.88 ± 0.55 μg/g). Mean urinary A:C on day 10 was 0.95 ± 0.63 μg/g for furosemide alone and 0.85 ± 0.21 μg/g for the combination of furosemide and pimobendan.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Furosemide-induced RAAS activation appeared to plateau by day 5. Administration of pimobendan at a standard dosage did not enhance or suppress furosemide-induced RAAS activation. These results in clinically normal dogs suggested that furosemide, administered with or without pimobendan, should be accompanied by RAAS-suppressive treatment.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research