Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: Bruce W. Christensen x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
History

A pregnant (150 days of gestation) 6-year-old Friesian mare that had been imported from The Netherlands was transported to the Contagious Equine Metritis Quarantine Facility at the University of California-Davis Center for Equine Health. Initial examination revealed a healthy mare with a body condition score of 5/9 and vital parameters within reference limits. Results for a CBC included a WBC count of 8,160 cells/mL and no abnormalities in the differential cell count. Throughout her stay at the quarantine facility, the mare had a rectal temperature between 37.2° and 37.67°C (99.0° and 99.8°F), maintained a good appetite, and had no

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 20-year-old gray Lusitano stallion was examined at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital of the University of California-Davis because of a 3-month history of unilateral (right-sided) scrotal swelling and 10-day history of generalized swelling of the preputial sheath. There was no history of trauma as a cause for the swellings. During the week prior to examination, the preputial sheath became progressively more swollen and the stallion did not exteriorize the penis during urination. The stallion had last been used for breeding 2 years previously, and the owners wanted semen collected from the stallion during the current breeding season.

Initial

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 4-year-old Thoroughbred mare was evaluated because of placental abnormalities and a retained placental remnant.

Clinical Findings—Microbial culture of the placenta yielded pure growth of Amycolatopsis spp. Histologic examination of the placenta revealed a focally expanding chorionitis with intralesional gram-positive filamentous bacilli and multifocal allantoic adenomatous hyperplasia on the apposing allantoic surface.

Treatment and Outcome—Treatment with lavage and oxytocin resulted in expulsion of the placental remnant within hours of parturition. The mare did not become pregnant again despite multiple breedings. The foal appeared healthy but died of complications during an elective surgical procedure at 7 weeks of age.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—To the author's knowledge, all previously confirmed cases of nocardioform placentitis have been in mares bred in the central Kentucky region. Indications that the pathogen in the mare reported here is a different species than that isolated in Kentucky suggest that this is an emerging disease. Mares with nocardioform placentitis usually do not have the same clinical signs as mares with placentitis resulting from an ascending pathogen.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 12-year-old 443-kg (975-lb) Quarter Horse mare, intended to be used for barrel racing, was referred to the theriogenology service of the veterinary teaching hospital at the University of California-Davis for a reproductive examination to assess fetal viability. Fifteen days prior to admission for the reproductive examination, clinicians at the same veterinary teaching hospital had examined and treated a laceration and subsequent septic condition involving the right metacarpophalangeal joint of the horse. At the time of admission, a solution (1 g of amikacin in 40 mL of isotonic saline [0.9% NaCl] solution) was perfused into the distal aspect of

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 16-year-old Quarter Horse stallion was examined to determine the cause for bilateral enlargement of the scrotum. The scrotum had gradually become enlarged during the preceding 12-month period, with enlargement most noticeable during the past 6 to 8 months. The stallion had signs of discomfort during the past 2 to 3 months.

The year prior to the scrotal enlargement, the stallion had been used for breeding. According to the owner, the stallion had normal fertility and impregnated numerous mares. During the 12 months prior to examination, the stallion was also used for breeding but did not successfully impregnate any

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 15-year-old Thoroughbred mare at 283 days of gestation was examined to determine the cause of frank, hemorrhagic vaginal discharge. The mare was from a large breeding farm and had been housed with other broodmares, none of which had any signs of reproductive problems. The mare had had 8 previous pregnancies, all with no complications.

The hemorrhagic discharge had been evident for 2 days and was believed to be increasing in quantity. The referring veterinarian had detected placental abnormalities during ultrasonography. The mare had no other outward signs of disease and did not appear to be in discomfort.

Results

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 19-year-old Thoroughbred mare was evaluated at 265 days of gestation with a markedly distended abdomen and edema of the ventral portion of the abdomen.

Clinical Findings—The uterus was distended over the pelvic rim, making transrectal palpation of the fetus impossible. Transabdominal ultrasonography revealed excessive amounts of fetal fluid. Results of analysis of fluid obtained via amnio- and allantocentesis confirmed that the amniotic cavity was large.

Treatment and Outcome—The mare was monitored for signs of weakness of the prepubic tendon and abdominal wall. The fetus and placenta were monitored for signs of stress and pending abortion. Flunixin meglumine and altrenogest were administered to the mare. Parturition was attended and occurred at 321 days' gestation. Postpartum complications in the mare included hypovolemic shock and cardiac arrhythmias. Both conditions were treated, and the mare recovered. The foal was considered small, had bilateral angular limb deformities, and was unable to nurse. The foal was given plasma for failure of passive transfer of immunity. Ten months later, the foal underwent procedures to correct limb deformities.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hydrops conditions are rare in horses, with hydrops allantois occurring more frequently than hydrops amnion; reportedly result in fetal or neonatal death; and may result in death of or injury to the mare. Close monitoring of maternal and fetal health in combination with supportive treatment of the mare can result in the safe progression of a hydrops pregnancy and the birth of a live foal.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association