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  • Author or Editor: Bruce A. Muggenburg x
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Abstract

Objective—To compare the efficacy of adrafinil, propentofylline, and nicergoline for enhancing behavior of aged dogs.

Animals—36 Beagles between 9 and 16 years old.

Procedure—Dogs were randomly assigned to receive adrafinil (20 mg/kg of body weight, PO, q 24 h; n = 12), propentofylline (5 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h; 12), or nicergoline (0.5 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h; 12) for 33 days. Baseline behaviors in an open field and in kennels (home cage) were recorded before treatment. After treatment, behaviors in the open field were recorded 2 hours after drug administration on days 2, 15, and 28, and 10 hours after administration on days 7, 20, and 33. Behaviors in the home cage were recorded 2 and 7 hours after drug administration on days 4, 17, and 30.

Results—Treatment with adrafinil resulted in a significant increase in locomotion in each of the open-field tests and an increase in locomotion in the home cage. This latter increase was smaller and more variable than that in the open field. Locomotion was not affected by treatment with propentofylline or nicergoline. In the open field, sniffing decreased over time in all 3 groups, but the largest decline was observed in the propentofylline group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Treatment with adrafinil may improve the quality of life of aged dogs by increasing exploratory behavior and alertness. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1410–1414)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To characterize the relation between bronchoalveolar and blood eosinophil numbers, serum total IgE concentration, and nonspecific airway reactivity in healthy dogs.

Animals

26 healthy Beagles.

Procedure

Prior to measurement of nonspecific airway responsiveness, dogs were anesthetized and bronchoscopy was performed to recover bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Repeated measurements were made in 6 dogs.

Results

The percentage of blood eosinophils varied between 0 and 13 (mean ± SD, 5.6 ± 3.6) %, the percentage of eosinophils in BAL fluid ranged between 0 and 63.5 (8.8 ± 12.9) %, and total serum IgE concentration was 0.1 to 107.5 (23.4 ± 29.1) U/ml. A strong association was evident between numbers of blood eosinophils and total serum IgE concentration (R 2 = 0.413, P < 0.001), and a trend toward an association between numbers of blood eosinophils and numbers of eosinophils in BAL fluid was apparent (R 2 = 0.110, P = 0.053). Significant associations were not found between any other aspects of the blood and BAL fluid cell profiles and total serum IgE concentration or airway reactivity. Serum total IgE concentration was not associated with airway reactivity. Further, in dogs examined on repeated occasions, variation in BAL fluid eosinophil numbers was not associated with any change in serum total IgE concentration or airway reactivity.

Conclusions

Neither numbers of bronchoalveolar or blood eosinophils nor serum total IgE concentration have a significant role in determining airway reactivity in healthy dogs. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:34–39)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research