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  • Author or Editor: Brigitte A. Brisson x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether there is a predis-position for lung lobe torsion (LLT) in Pugs and describe clinical findings associated with LLT in that breed, compared with findings in other breeds.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—7 Pugs and 16 dogs of other breeds.

Procedure—Information collected from records included signalment, history, lung lobe affected, results of clinicopathologic testing, histologic findings, diagnostic imaging results, surgical treatment, and outcome.

Results—23 dogs were diagnosed with LLT, 10 of which were large-breed dogs and 13 of which were small-breed dogs. Seven of the small-breed dogs were Pugs. Pugs with LLT were significantly overrepresented, compared with the general hospital population. Affected Pugs ranged in age from 4.5 months to 4 years (median, 1.5 years). Six of the 7 Pugs had no predisposing conditions, and 6 were male. Six Pugs survived to discharge. Of the other small- and large-breed dogs, 3 of 6 and 5 of 10 survived to discharge, respectively. None of the Pugs were readmitted for complications or recurrence.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that young male Pugs may be predisposed to developing spontaneous LLT. The prognosis for survival and resolution of clinical signs in Pugs with LLT appeared to be excellent. Factors contributing to the development of LLT in Pugs are not known.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether injection of a mesenteric lymph node with iodinated aqueous contrast medium results in radiographic delineation of the thoracic duct and its branches, ascertain the ideal interval between injection and radiographic imaging, and evaluate mesenteric lymphadenography performed via laparoscopic and surgical approaches in dogs.

Animals—10 adult dogs.

Procedure—In each dog, a right paracostal laparotomy or a right laparoscopic approach was performed to identify a mesenteric lymph node for injection of an iodinated aqueous contrast agent (0.22 mL/kg [81.4 mg of iodine/kg]). Lateral radiographic views were obtained at 60, 120, 180, 240, and 300 seconds after injection.

Results—A mesenteric lymph node was identified and injected with contrast medium in each dog. Via paracostal laparotomy, lymph node injection resulted in successful lymphangiographic evaluation in 4 of 5 dogs, whereas via the laparoscopic approach, lymph node injection resulted in successful lymphangio-graphic evaluation in 2 of 5 dogs. In successful radiographic evaluations, injected lymph nodes, mesenteric lymphatics, and the thoracic duct and its branches were delineated. Radiographs obtained at 60 and 120 seconds after injection of contrast medium provided the most detail.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Injection of a mesenteric lymph node directly with contrast medium appears to be a feasible technique for delineation of the thoracic duct and its branches in dogs and might be useful in small animals in which mesenteric lymphatic catheterization can be difficult and lymphangiography is more likely to fail. Refinement of the laparoscopic technique may provide a minimally invasive approach to lymphadenography.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 1-year-old neutered male cat was examined because of a 6-month history of recurrent swelling and draining wounds affecting the craniomedial aspect of the distal portion of the left forelimb.

Clinical Findings—No lameness or neurologic deficits were evident. Examination of craniocaudal and lateromedial radiographic views revealed nonprogressive circumferential osteolysis and a mildly radiopaque, ring-shaped foreign body surrounding the radius and ulna.

Treatment and Outcome—During surgery, a tight elastic band surrounded by a thick fibrous tissue capsule was found encircling the limb. Microbial culture yielded a Staphylococcus sp that was susceptible to clindamycin. Follow-up monitoring via telephone communication with the owners 1.5 years after removal of the foreign body indicated that the cat had healed with no recurrence of drainage.

Clinical Relevance—Pressure osteolysis of the bones of the forelimb can be caused by a circumferential foreign body without associated neurologic abnormalities or lameness.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 10-year-old Golden Retriever evaluated because of recurrent pericardial and pleural effusion underwent thoracoscopy with biopsy of the pleura and mediastinum.

Clinical Findings—Before thoracoscopy, 5 L of serosanguinous fluid was removed from the pleural cavity via thoracocentesis. During thoracoscopic exploration, it was observed that the parietal pleura and mediastinum were covered by miliary white to tan nodules 1 to 3 mm in diameter. Biopsy specimens were obtained, and partial pericardiectomy was performed. Portal sites were closed routinely. Cytologic evaluation of the pleural fluid revealed high protein concentration and cellularity, with cellular changes consistent with an exfoliating carcinoma. Results of bacterial culture were negative.

Treatment and Outcome—Carboplatin was administered via intracavitary instillation, and prednisone was administered orally. Twenty-one days later, 1 firm, irregularly shaped 6.5 × 3-cm mass and 4 smaller masses were detected in the area of the left thoracic wall where the cannula had been inserted during thoracoscopy. Histologic analysis of tissue from the masses collected at necropsy confirmed that they were malignant tumors with similar appearance to the pleural mesothelioma and immunohistochemical staining properties identical to those of the primary tumor.

Clinical Relevance—Although thoracoscopy is associated with less postoperative pain, shorter hospitalization times, and faster patient recovery than sternotomy procedures, complications are also possible with minimally invasive endoscopic surgery. Portal site metastasis can develop from contamination of portal sites with cells on instruments or cannulas or via leakage of effusion fluid. Although rare, this potential complication should be discussed with owners prior to performing the procedure.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of laparoscopic-assistedjejunostomy feeding tube (J-tube) placement in healthy dogs under sedation with epidural and local anesthesia and compare cardiopulmonary responses during this epidural anesthetic protocol with cardiopulmonary responses during general anesthesia for laparoscopic-assisted or open surgical J-tube placement.

Animals—15 healthy mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were randomly assigned to receive open surgical J-tube placement under general anesthesia (n = 5dogs; group 1), laparoscopic-assisted J-tube placement under general anesthesia (5; group 2), or laparoscopic-assisted J-tube placement under sedation with epidural and local anesthesia (5; group 3). Cardiopulmonary responses were measured at baseline (time 0), every 5 minutes during the procedure (times 5 to 30 minutes), and after the procedure (after desufflation [groups 2 and 3] or at the start of abdominal closure [group 1]). Stroke volume, cardiac index, and O2 delivery were calculated.

Results—All group 3 dogs tolerated laparoscopic-assisted J-tube placement under sedation with epidural and local anesthesia. Comparison of cardiovascular parameters revealed a significantly higher cardiac index, mean arterial pressure, and O2 delivery in group 3 dogs, compared with group 1 and 2 dogs. Minimal differences in hemodynamic parameters were foundbetween groups undergoing laparoscopic-assistedandopen surgical J-tube placement under general anesthesia (ie, groups 1 and 2); these differences were not considered to be clinically important in healthy research dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Sedation with epidural and local anesthesia provided satisfactory conditions for laparoscopic-assisted J-tube placement in healthy dogs; this anesthetic protocol caused less cardiopulmonary depression than general anesthesia and may represent a better choice for J-tube placement in critically ill patients.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives—To evaluate a population of chondrodystrophic dogs treated for Hansen type I intervertebral disk (IVD) disease by surgical decompression with or without prophylactic fenestration and determine the rate and location of surgically confirmed recurrence of intervertebral disk extrusion.

Animals—265 dogs.

Study Design—Retrospective study.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that underwent spinal decompression between 1995 and 1999 were reviewed.

Results—13 (4.9%) dogs were euthanatized or died prior to discharge. Fenestration was performed in 252 dogs, including 37 (14.7%) at the site of decompression only, 48 (19%) at 3 to 4 disk spaces, and 167 (66%) at 5 to 7 disk spaces. There were 12 instances of recurrent disk extrusion confirmed by removal of disk at a second surgery 3.5 to 33 months after the first surgery. Recurrence was always at a new disk space, and rates did not significantly differ between dogs that underwent single or multiple fenestrations. Two recurrences were at a previously fenestrated disk space. Seven recurrences were at a site immediately adjacent to a fenestrated disk space, and 5 recurrences were at L4-5.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Prophylactic fenestration is generally successful in preventing future disk extrusions at fenestrated disk spaces. Prospective evaluation is still required to determine whether fenestration decreases the overall rate of recurrence. Prophylactic fenestration could promote disk extrusion at adjacent, nonfenestrated disk spaces. This could have a substantial clinical impact if recurrence develops at L4-5. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1808–1814)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association