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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Medical records of 3 cats and 72 dogs that had a fishhook endoscopically or surgically retrieved from the stomach or esophagus were reviewed. Endoscopic retrieval was successful in 41 of 62 (66%) animals, and retrieval time and hospitalization time for endoscopic retrieval were significantly shorter than times for surgical retrieval. Rate of failure of endoscopic retrieval was higher for animals with treble-barb, rather than single-barb, fishhooks. Whether a fishhook could be successfully retrieved endoscopically was independent of body weight, amount of time the fishhook had been present, location of the hook, and orientation within the esophagus.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Effects of temperature and storage time on canine bone-transfixation pin specimens were tested by comparing pin pull-out forces. A total of 16 femurs from 8 mature dogs were tested. Five nonthreaded Steinmann pins were placed through both cortices in the diaphysis of each femur. The femurs were then sectioned transversely between each pin, with a bonepin specimen placed evenly into each of 5 groups prior to biomechanical testing. Four bone-pin specimen groups were stored at −20 or −70 C for 14 or 28 days, while 1 specimen group was immediately tested. Pull-out forces for frozen groups were compared with pull-out forces for the fresh group.

Using two-way anova, there was no statistical difference in mean axial-extraction forces among bonepin specimens in any of the tested groups. It is concluded that acute pin pull-out forces are not significantly affected by freezing temperature or time. However, specimens stored at −20 C for as few as 14 days had a trend for increased pull-out forces, compared with freshly harvested specimens. Therefore, the authors recommend storage of bone-pin specimens at −70 C when possible.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association