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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—2 horses were examined for chronic nasal discharge secondary to unilateral guttural pouch mycosis.

Clinical Findings—Initial endoscopic examination of both horses confirmed the presence of a fungal plaque on the dorsomedial aspect of the medial compartment of the guttural pouch (auditory tube diverticulum) involving the internal carotid artery (ICA). No signs of hemorrhage or neurologic deficits were present at admission.

Treatment and Outcome—Transarterial stainless steel coil embolization of the affected ICA was performed under general anesthesia, with fluoroscopic guidance. During treatment, an aberrant branch of the ICA, or a proposed bifid ICA, that anastomosed with the caudal cerebellar artery was identified. Occlusion of the distal (noncardiac) side of the aberrant branch was performed in both horses because of potential mycotic involvement at that level. Following treatment, resolution of the mycotic infection was observed in both horses; however, 1 horse developed neurologic signs compatible with unilateral caudal cerebellar artery ischemia on recovery from anesthesia; these signs resolved over the following 2 months.

Clinical Relevance—Findings highlighted variability of the anatomy of the ICA in 2 horses that was identified during treatment for guttural pouch mycosis and identified caudal cerebellar artery infarction as a potential complication of treatment. Because of the size and pathway of both arterial branches, we suggest that the term bifurcation of the ICA is more appropriate than aberrant branching, as has been previously described in the literature. The information in this report may be of value to clinicians performing procedures involving the vasculature of the head and neck in horses.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify Doppler echocardiographic (DE) variables that correlate with left ventricular filling pressure (LVFP).

Animals—7 healthy dogs (1 to 3 years old).

Procedures—Dogs were anesthetized and instrumented to measure left atrial pressure (LAP), left ventricular pressures, and cardiac output. Nine DE variables of LVFP derived from diastolic time intervals, transmitral and pulmonary venous flow, and tissue Doppler images were measured over a range of hemodynamic states induced by volume loading and right atrial pacing. Associations between simultaneous invasive measures of LVFP and DE measures of LVFP were determined by use of regression analysis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to predict increases in mean LAP on the basis of DE variables.

Results—Mean LAP was correlated with several DE variables: the ratio between peak velocity during early diastolic transmitral flow and left ventricular isovolumic relaxation time (peak E:IVRT) during sinus rhythm and during right atrial pacing, IVRT, the ratio between late diastolic transmitral flow velocity and pulmonary venous flow duration, and the interval between onset of early diastolic mitral annulus motion and onset of early diastolic transmitral flow. Cutoff values of 2.20 and 2.17, for peak E:IVRT in dogs with sinus rhythm and atrial pacing predicted increases in mean LAP (≥ 15 mm Hg) with sensitivities of 90% and 100% and specificities of 92% and 100%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Doppler echocardiography can be used to predict an increase in LVFP in healthy anesthetized dogs subjected to volume loading.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 2.96-kg (6.5-lb) 9-month-old spayed female domestic longhair cat was admitted for removal of a tracheal foreign body.

Clinical Findings—The cat had moderate respiratory distress but otherwise appeared to be healthy. Thoracic radiography revealed a foreign body in the trachea.

Treatment and Outcome—The cat was anesthetized and endoscopy of the trachea was performed in an attempt to retrieve the foreign body. Endoscopic removal was unsuccessful because of the shape and smooth texture of the foreign body. Surgical removal of the foreign body was not considered ideal because of its location and the risks associated with tracheotomy. Fluoroscopic-guided placement of an over-the-wire balloon catheter caudal to the foreign body was followed by inflation of the balloon and gradual traction in an orad direction, which resulted in successful removal of the foreign body (identified as a piece of landscaping gravel). The cat required supplemental oxygen and supportive care following removal of the foreign body.

Clinical Relevance—A fluoroscopic technique was used as a minimally invasive alternative to endoscopy or open-chest surgery for removal of a foreign body from the trachea of a cat. Use of this technique allowed uninterrupted ventilation of the cat throughout the procedure. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2010;237:689-694)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—4 dogs with acquired pulmonary artery stenosis (PAS) were examined for various clinical signs. One was a mixed-breed dog with congenital valvular PAS that subsequently developed peripheral PAS, one was a Golden Retriever with pulmonary valve fibrosarcoma, one was a Pembroke Welsh Corgi in which the left pulmonary artery had inadvertently been ligated during surgery for correction of patent ductus arteriosus, and one was a Boston Terrier with a heart-base mass compressing the pulmonary arteries.

Clinical Findings—All 4 dogs were evaluated with 2-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography to characterize the nature and severity of the stenoses; other diagnostic tests were also performed.

Treatment and Outcome—The mixed-breed dog with valvular and peripheral PAS was euthanized, surgical resection of the pulmonic valve mass was performed in the Golden Retriever, corrective surgery was performed on the Pembroke Welsh Corgi with left pulmonary artery ligation, and the Boston Terrier with the heart-base mass was managed medically.

Clinical Relevance—Acquired PAS in dogs may manifest as a clinically silent heart murmur, syncope, or right-sided heart failure. The diagnosis is made on the basis of imaging findings, particularly results of 2-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography. Treatment may include surgical, interventional, or medical modalities and is targeted at resolving the inciting cause.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the accuracy of a commercial ultrasonographic cardiac output (CO) monitoring system (UCOMS) in anesthetized Beagles as assessed by comparison with thermodilution CO (TDCO).

Animals—8 healthy anesthetized Beagles.

Procedures—Simultaneous UCOMS and TDCO measurements of CO were obtained during 4 hemodynamic states: baseline anesthesia (0.5% to 1.5% isoflurane), a higher depth of anesthesia (2% to 3.5% isoflurane) to yield a ≥ 15% reduction in systolic arterial blood pressure, IV infusion of colloidal solution to a mean right atrial pressure of ≥ 15 mm Hg, and IV infusion of dobutamine at 5 μg/kg/min. Measurements were obtained at 2 probe positions: the subxiphoid region and the right thoracic inlet. Correlation and agreement of results between methods were determined via linear regression analysis and Bland-Altman plots.

Results—A significant positive correlation was detected between UCOMS andTDCO measurements obtained at the subxiphoid (R = 0.86) and thoracic inlet (R = 0.83) positions. Bland-Altman plots revealed minimal bias between methods (bias ± SD, −0.03 ± 0.73 L/min and −0.20 ± 0.80 L/min for subxiphoid and thoracic inlet measurements, respectively). However, the percentage error associated with UCOMS measurements made at the 2 positions was > 45%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—When compared with the results of TDCO, CO measured with the UCOMS exceeded commonly accepted limits of error in healthy dogs. The UCOMS was, however, able to track changes in CO across hemodynamic states. Additional research is needed to assess the usefulness of the UCOMS for monitoring CO in critically ill dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research