Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Brandon L. Plattner x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To characterize the distribution and intensity of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in the eyes of cats with and without uveitis and to determine whether COX-2 expression is correlated with severity of inflammation.

SAMPLES Archived ocular tissue specimens from 51 cats with and 10 cats without ocular disease.

PROCEDURES Specimens from only 1 eye were evaluated for each cat. Specimens were stained with H&E stain or immunohistochemical stain for detection of COX-2 and reviewed. For each eye, the type, severity, and distribution of inflammation and the distribution and intensity of COX-2 expression were determined for the uvea and other ocular tissues. Correlation between COX-2 expression and inflammation severity was also assessed.

RESULTS COX-2 was not expressed in any nondiseased eye. Of the 51 diseased eyes, 20 had histologic evidence of lymphocytic-plasmacytic uveitis, 13 had neutrophilic uveitis, 11 had diffuse iris melanoma with uveitis, and 7 had diffuse iris melanoma without uveitis. Of the 44 eyes with uveitis, COX-2 was detected in the uvea of 16, including 11 eyes with lymphocytic-plasmacytic uveitis, 4 with neutrophilic uveitis, and 1 with diffuse iris melanoma–induced uveitis. Inflammation was severe, moderate, or mild in 10, 5, and 1 of those eyes, respectively. Cyclooxygenase-2 was detected in the cornea of 21 eyes with uveitis and 1 eye with diffuse iris melanoma without uveitis. Uveitis severity was positively correlated with COX-2 expression in both the uvea and cornea.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that COX-2 is an inflammatory mediator in feline uveitis but not diffuse iris melanoma.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on expression of fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF) in skin with surgically created skin wounds and intact skin in horses.

Animals—14 healthy horses.

Procedure—8 horses were treated with ESWT at 6 locations along the neck at 36, 24, 12, 6, 2, or 1 hour prior to collection of full-thickness biopsy specimens from each location; a control specimen was collected from a sham-treated location. In 6 horses, 5 full-thickness wounds were created in each forelimb. Wounds in 1 forelimb/horse received ESWT immediately after creation and subsequently on days 7, 14, and 21; wounds in the contralateral forelimb remained untreated. Biopsy specimens were collected from 1 wound on each forelimb on days 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35. Expression levels of FGF-7, TGF-β1, IGF-1, PDGF, and VEGF were assessed in tissue samples from the horses' necks and forelimbs.

Results—In surgically created wounds, ESWT treatment was associated with reduced TGF-β1 expression, compared with expression in control wounds, during the entire study period. At 28 days following wound creation, IGF-1 expression was significantly increased for treated and untreated wounds, compared with findings on days 7, 14, 21, and 35. There was no significant effect of treatment on FGF-7, TGF-β1, IGF-1, PDGF, or VEGF expression in intact skin.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intervention with ESWT to suppress TGF-β1 may decrease granulation tissue production, resulting in improved wound healing on the distal portion of horses' limbs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research