Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 38 items for

  • Author or Editor: Boaz Arzi x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate use of lufenuron for treating cutaneous fungal infections in dogs and cats.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—156 dogs and 201 cats with dermatophytosis or superficial dermatomycoses.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed for dogs and cats that had been treated for dermatophytosis or other fungal infections by administration of lufenuron and 18 dogs and 42 cats that were not treated and served as a control group.

Results—Dogs were treated once by oral administration of lufenuron tablets at doses ranging from 54.2 to 68.3 mg/kg (24.6 to 31.0 mg/lb) of body weight. Samples of skin, scrapings, and hair were obtained daily from 14 dogs with dermatophytosis; mean durations from time of treatment to time of negative fungal culture results and resolution of gross lesions were 14.5 and 20.75 days, respectively. In all treated dogs, gross lesions resolved within approximately 21 days. Cats were treated once by oral administration of lufenuron suspension in doses ranging from 51.2 to 266 mg/kg (23.3 to 120.9 mg/lb). Samples were obtained daily from 23 cats; mean durations from time of treatment to time of negative fungal culture results and resolution of gross lesions were 8.3 and 12 days, respectively. Time to resolution of lesions in most untreated control animals was approximately 90 days. Adverse effects of treatment were not detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study suggest that lufenuron provides an effective, convenient, and rapid method for treating fungal infections in dogs and cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1510–1513)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Author:

Abstract

Management of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) fractures is challenging and is a subject of ongoing discussions and controversies in both the veterinary and human medical fields. Regardless of the management strategy, obtaining precise diagnostic imaging in the form of conventional or cone-beam computed tomography and potentially magnetic resonance imaging is pivotal for medical and surgical decision-making and prognostic purposes. The main objective of TMJ fracture management is a rapid return to normal function via restoration of pretrauma occlusion, range of motion, and masticatory function. With that in mind, it is prudent to distinguish between surgical interventions, such as condylectomy and open reduction with internal fixation, or to elect a conservative management approach. Given the diversity in TMJ fracture and patient circumstances, such as age, concomitant trauma, financial situation, and availability of expertise, the formulation of an individualized treatment plan is recommended. Knowledge of potential short- and long-term complications such as infection, malocclusion, ankylosis, fibrosis, and osteoarthritis is essential during TMJ fracture management. Importantly, as our clinical and research knowledge on managing TMJ fractures in dogs and cats grows, we rely on comparative evidence-based overviews, and inspirations from human medical experts to advance the veterinary field. Hence, this review discusses contemporary approaches to managing TMJ fractures and the outcomes in dogs and cats from a one-health perspective.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association