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Abstract

Objective—To determine current attitudes and practices related to pain and analgesia in cattle among US veterinarians in bovine practice and to identify factors associated with these attitudes and practices.

Design—Web-based survey.

Sample—3,019 US members of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners (AABP) with e-mail addresses.

Procedures—Veterinarians were invited via e-mail to participate in a Web-based survey. Respondents replied to questions related to pain and analgesia and supplied personal, professional, and demographic information. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed, and associations among various factors were examined.

Results—666 surveys (25.5% response rate) were analyzed. Among common procedures and medical conditions of cattle listed on the survey, castration of dairy calves < 6 months old was subjectively estimated as causing the least pain; abdominal surgery, toxic mastitis, and dehorning of calves > 6 months old were assessed as causing the greatest pain. Respondents reported not providing analgesic drugs to approximately 70% of calves castrated at < 6 months of age. The most commonly administered analgesics were NSAIDs, local anesthetics, and α2-adrenergic receptor agonists. Significant associations were detected among respondent characteristics and pain ratings, percentages of cattle treated, and opinions regarding analgesia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results provide information on current attitudes and practices related to pain and analgesia in cattle among US veterinarians in bovine practice and can be considered in the development of policies and protocols for pain management in cattle. These data can be compared with those of future studies to examine changes over time.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To estimate associations between dietary factors and pancreatitis in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case-control study.

Animals—198 dogs with a clinical diagnosis of pancreatitis and 187 control dogs with a diagnosis of renal failure without clinical evidence of pancreatitis.

Procedures—Information on signalment, weight, body condition, dietary intake, medical history, diagnostic tests performed, concurrent diseases, treatments, duration of hospitalization, and discharge status was extracted from medical records. Information on dietary intake, signalment, weight, and medical, surgical, and environmental history was collected through a telephone questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals.

Results—On the basis of information extracted from the medical record, ingesting unusual food items (OR, 4.3) increased the odds of pancreatitis. On the basis of information gathered through the telephone questionnaire, ingesting unusual food items (OR, 6.1), ingesting table scraps the week before diagnosis (OR, 2.2) or throughout life (OR, 2.2), and getting into the trash (OR, 13.2) increased the odds of pancreatitis. Multivariable modeling indicated that reporting exposure to ≥ 1 dietary factor during the telephone questionnaire (OR, 2.6), being overweight (OR, 1.3) or neutered (OR, 3.6), previous surgery other than neutering (OR, 21.1), and the interaction between neuter status and previous surgery other than neutering (OR, 0.1) were associated with the odds of pancreatitis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that dietary factors, being neutered, and previous surgery other than neutering increased the odds of pancreatitis in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To estimate herd-level sensitivity (HSe), specificity (HSp), and predictive values for a positive (HPVP) and negative (HPVN) test result for several testing scenarios for detection of tuberculosis in cattle by use of simulation modeling.

Sample Population—Empirical distributions of all herds (15,468) and herds in a 10-county area (1,016) in Michigan.

Procedures—5 test scenarios were simulated: scenario 1, serial interpretation of the caudal fold tuberculin (CFT) test and comparative cervical test (CCT); scenario 2, serial interpretation of the CFT test and CCT, microbial culture for mycobacteria, and polymerase chain reaction assay; scenario 3, same as scenario 2 but specificity was fixed at 1.0; and scenario 4, sensitivity was 0.9 (scenario 4a) or 0.95 (scenario 4b), and specificity was fixed at 1.0.

Results—Estimates for HSe were reasonably high, ranging between 0.712 and 0.840. Estimates for HSp were low when specificity was not fixed at 1.0. Estimates of HPVP were low for scenarios 1 and 2 (0.042 and 0.143, respectively) but increased to 1.0 when specificity was fixed at 1.0. The HPVN remained high for all 5 scenarios, ranging between 0.995 and 0.997. As herd size increased, HSe increased and HSp and HPVP decreased. However, fixing specificity at 1.0 had only minor effects on HSp and HPVN, but HSe was low when the herd size was small.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tests used for detecting cattle herds infected with tuberculosis work well on a herd basis. Herds with < approximately 100 cattle should be tested more frequently or for a longer duration than larger herds to ensure that these small herds are free of tuberculosis. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1285–1291)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine and compare levels and patterns of antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli isolated from pigs on farms that did not use antimicrobial agents versus pigs produced under conventional methods.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Sample Population—35 antimicrobial-free and 60 conventional swine farms.

Procedures—Farms were visited once, and fecal samples were collected from 15 finisher pigs if available. One E coli isolate from each sample was tested for susceptibility pattern to 14 antimicrobial agents by use of microbroth dilution.

ResultsE coli isolates were recovered from 1,381 (97.1%) of 1,422 fecal samples. Herd size was significantly larger for conventional swine farms. Resistance to ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, or nalidixic acid was not observed on any of the 95 farms. Three isolates from 2 conventional farms were resistant to ceftiofur. Conventional farms had significantly higher levels of resistance to ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol, compared with antimicrobial-free farms. Fourteen percent of E coli isolates were susceptible or had intermediate resistance to all the tested antimicrobial agents. The 3 most frequent patterns of multiple resistance were streptomycin-tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline, and kanamycin-streptomycin-sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cessation of antimicrobial use did not appear to result in an immediate reduction in antimicrobial resistance in swine farms. Prospective studies of long-term antimicrobial usage and cessation are needed to estimate the extent to which food animal production may be contributing to antimicrobial drug resistance and might provide a direct measure of the rates of reversibility of antimicrobial drug resistance that might be achieved by curtailing antimicrobial usage.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the prevalence of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) in beef bulls; evaluate the presence of BLV provirus DNA in blood, smegma, and semen samples; and analyze whether blood BLV proviral load was associated with differential blood cell counts.

DESIGN

Observational cross-sectional study.

ANIMALS

121 beef bulls ≥ 2 years old from 39 Michigan herds.

PROCEDURES

Blood, smegma, and semen samples were collected from each bull during a routine breeding soundness examination. An ELISA was used to detect serum anti-BLV antibodies. A coordination of common motifs-quantitative PCR assay was used to detect BLV provirus DNA in blood, smegma, and semen samples. Bulls with positive results on both the BLV serum ELISA and coordination of common motifs-quantitative PCR assay were considered infected with BLV.

RESULTS

19 of 39 (48.7%) herds and 54 of 121 (44.6%) bulls were infected with BLV. Provirus DNA was detected in the blood of all 54 and in smegma of 4 BLV-infected bulls but was not detected in any semen sample. Lymphocyte count was significantly greater in BLV-infected bulls than in uninfected bulls. The proportion of BLV-infected bulls with lymphocytosis (16/54 [29.6%]) was greater than the proportion of uninfected bulls with lymphocytosis (6/67 [9%]). Lymphocyte count was positively associated with BLV proviral load in BLV-infected bulls.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that almost half of beef bulls and herds were infected with BLV, and BLV provirus DNA was detected in the smegma of some BLV-infected bulls. Bulls may have an important role in BLV transmission in beef herds.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of exposure to environmental mycobacteria on results of 2 commercial ELISAs for paratuberculosis in cattle.

Design—Experimental trial.

Animals—19 weaned crossbred beef calves.

Procedures—Calves were inoculated SC with 1 of 5 mycobacterial isolates (3 calves/isolate) derived from herds with high proportions of false-positive serologic reactions for paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP; positive control inoculum; 2 calves), or mineral oil (negative control inoculum; 2 calves). Sera were assessed at intervals by use of 2 ELISAs (A and B) for paratuberculosis in cattle, and all calves underwent tuberculosis testing at the end of the study.

Results—Neither mineral oil–inoculated calf had positive results with either ELISA during the study. Both MAP-inoculated calves were identified as seropositive via ELISA-A, and 1 calf was identified as seropositive via ELISA-B. By use of ELISA-A, ≥ 1 false-positive reaction over time was detected in 2, 3, 3, and 1 of the 3 calves injected with Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, or Mycobacterium terrae, respectively. By use of ELISA-B, only M scrofulaceum induced false-positive reactions (2/3 calves). Calves that had at least 1 positive ELISA-A result were more likely to be classified as suspect reactors via the caudal fold tuberculosis test.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—False-positive serologic reactions may occur during use of commercially available ELISAs for paratuberculosis in calves experimentally exposed to environmental mycobacteria; naturally occurring exposures with these mycobacteria may represent a cause for high proportions of false-positive serologic reactions for paratu-berculosis in some cattle herds.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

The subclinical impact of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) on the sustainability of the US dairy industry is only now being fully recognized. Findings of recent longitudinal studies conducted in Michigan dairy herds were consistent with the results of previous studies in showing that within-herd prevalence of BLV–infected cattle was negatively associated with milk production and cow longevity. Risk factors relating to routes of hematogenous transmission such as the use of shared hypodermic needles, shared reproductive examination sleeves, and natural breeding were associated with BLV within-herd prevalence. Few US dairy producers know the prevalence of BLV-infected cattle in their herds or are aware of the insidious economic impact of BLV or the options for BLV control. As an increasing number of countries eradicate BLV from their cattle populations, restrictions on the movement of US cattle and cattle products will likely increase. Veterinarians should be aware of recent developments for screening serum and milk samples for antibodies against BLV and the results of research regarding the economic impact of BLV so they can advise their dairy clients of available alternatives for monitoring and controlling BLV infection.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate administration of chlortetracycline in feed of cattle as a method to select for tetracycline resistance among enteric bacteria in feedlot settings.

Animals—20 steers.

Procedures—Steers were randomly assigned to an exposed cohort (n = 10) or an unexposed cohort (control cohort; 10). Chlortetracycline (22 mg/kg) in cottonseed meal was administered to the exposed cohort on days 0 through 4, 6 through 10, and 12 through 16. The control cohort was administered only cottonseed meal. Fecal samples were collected from 16 steers on days −7, 0, 2, 6, 8, 12, 14, 19, 22, 26, and 33, and Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp were isolated. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of selected antimicrobials was estimated.

Results—Overall, 56.0% and 31.4% of E coli and Enterococcus isolates, respectively, were resistant to tetracycline. Exposure to chlortetracycline was associated with a significant temporary increase in log2 MIC for both genera but returned to preexposure values by day 33. Averaged across time, the proportion of tetracycline-resistant E coli and Enterococcus isolates was significantly greater in exposed than in unexposed steers. Although all ceftiofur-resistant E coli isolates were coresistant to tetracycline, exposure to chlortetracycline led to a significant decrease in the proportion of E coli resistant to ceftiofur during exposure.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Exposure to chlortetracycline was associated with a temporary increase in the likelihood of recovering resistant bacteria. Exposure to chlortetracycline decreased the likelihood of recovering ceftiofur-resistant E coli isolates, even though isolates were coresistant to tetracycline. These findings warrant further investigation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether feeding a direct-fed microbial (DFM) to dairy calves would reduce total and antimicrobial-resistant coliform counts in feces and affect average daily gain (ADG).

ANIMALS 21 preweaned Holstein heifer calves.

PROCEDURES The study had a randomized complete block design. Within each block, 3 consecutively born calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups within 24 hours after birth (day 0). Calves were fed the DFM at 1.0 g (DFM1; n = 7) or 0.5 g (DFM2; 7) twice daily or no DFM (control; 7) from days 0 through 29. A fecal sample was collected from each calf daily on days 0 through 3 and then every other day through day 29. Fecal samples were cultured, and mean numbers of total coliforms and coliforms resistant to ampicillin, ceftiofur, and tetracycline were compared among the 3 treatment groups. Calves were weighed on days 0 and 29 to calculate ADG.

RESULTS Mean total fecal coliform counts did not differ significantly among the 3 treatment groups. Mean ceftiofur-resistant and tetracycline-resistant coliform counts for the control group were significantly lower, compared with those for the DFM1 and DFM2 groups. Mean ADG did not differ significantly between the DFM1 and DFM2 groups; however, the mean ADG for all calves fed the DFM was 0.15 kg less than that for control calves.

CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that the DFM fed to the preweaned calves of this study did not reduce total or antimicrobial-resistant coliform counts in feces.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of administration of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA) on antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli in feedlot cattle.

Animals—61 feedlot steers.

Procedures—A cohort study was conducted. Steers were housed in pens (5 pens with 10 steers and 1 pen with 11 steers). Five steers in each pen were administered CCFA, and 5 served as control steers (1 pen had 6 control steers). The CCFA administration included a single-dose regimen (6.6 mg/kg, SC, on day 0), two-thirds–dose regimen (4.4 mg/kg, SC, on day 0), and 3-dose regimen (6.6 mg/kg, SC, on days 0, 6, and 13). Fecal samples were collected on days 0, 2, 6, 9, 13, 16, 20, and 28. Fecal samples were collected immediately before CCFA administration. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of 15 antimicrobials were determined for 3 E coli isolates/fecal sample. Escherichia coli were enumerated by use of direct-plating techniques.

Results—Resistance to 1 or more antimicrobials was detected in 986 of 1,441 (68.4%) isolates recovered. Administration of CCFA was associated with a transient increase in the population of ceftiofur-resistant isolates. Susceptibility returned to day 0 values (ie, samples collected immediately before CCFA administration) approximately 2 weeks after completion of CCFA administration. Agreement between ceftiofur resistance and coresistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline was almost perfect (κ 0.97). We did not detect variation in susceptibility of E coli recovered from commingled control steers.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of CCFA provided selection pressure that favored transient expansion of multiple-resistant variants.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research