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  • Author or Editor: Blaine T. Johnson x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the risk and timing of right heart failure (RHF) in feedlot cattle.

ANIMALS

Study population consisted of 1,717,356 cattle (5,527 cohorts) in 13 US and Canadian feedlots. There were 1,336 RHF diagnosed at necropsy.

PROCEDURES

Multivariable models were utilized to evaluate risk and timing of RHF death.

RESULTS

Arrival year was associated with RHF and was influenced by arrival quarter on the magnitude of risk of RHF (P < .01), but no linear increase over years was identified. The impact of feedlot elevation on RHF was modified by breed (beef, dairy, or dairy-cross; P < .01) with beef cattle in the highest elevation category having 0.54 times the risk of RHF as dairy cattle in the same elevation category (LCL = 0.31; UCL = 0.962). Cattle that died due to RHF and were treated for bovine respiratory disease died 11 days (LCL = 1.33, UCL = 20.2 days) sooner than cattle never treated for bovine respiratory disease (P = .03). Cattle breed was associated with RHF timing (P = .01), and dairy-cross cattle RHF cases died approximately 37 days earlier (SE = 13.0 days; P = .01) compared to beef cattle.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

This research showed demographic factors associated with RHF and their respective influence on risk and timing of RHF. Risk rates of RHF were similar to previous research. This could allow for comparisons across different feedlot populations, using different diagnoses at necropsy and RHF risk/rates do not appear to be increasing.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study sought to determine whether firocoxib (FIRO) or meloxicam (MEL) was effective at providing analgesia after surgical castration in goats.

ANIMALS

18 intact male crossbred goats (6 to 8 months old) were enrolled with a mean weight of 32.6 (± 2.9) kg.

METHODS

Surgical castration was done under injectable anesthesia by a licensed veterinarian. Twelve bucks were surgically castrated and given either FIRO (n = 6) or MEL (n = 6). Six bucks served as controls (CNTLs) and were not castrated. Outcome measurements included visual analogue scale, infrared thermography, plasma cortisol, plasma substance P, and kinetic gait analysis. All outcome measurements were obtained at –24, 4, 8, 24, 48, and 72 hours.

RESULTS

All 3 treatments were significantly different from each other at the 24- and 48-hour time points, with MEL animals having lower visual analogue scale scores when compared to FIRO animals; CNTL animals exhibited the lowest plasma cortisol levels (3.19 ng/mL; 95% CI, –1.21 to 7.59 ng/mL) followed by FIRO (7.45 ng/mL; 95% CI, 3.10 to 11.80 ng/mL) and MEL (10.24 ng/mL; 95% CI, 5.87 to 14.60 ng/mL). FIRO had an average mean decrease in gait velocity change (–54.17 cm/s; 95% CI, –92.99 to –15.35 cm/s), while MEL had an increase in gait velocity when compared to baseline values (14.54 cm/s; 95% CI, –24.27 to 53.36 cm/s). Control animals had an average mean of –3.06 cm/s (95% CI, –41.88 to 35.75 cm/s).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results from this study showed that there were some analgesic effects from administering MEL when compared to bucks that received a placebo treatment (CNTL).

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association