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  • Author or Editor: Bianca Carstanjen x
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Abstract

Objective—To obtain morphometric values for the superficial digital flexor tendon, deep digital flexor tendon, accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor muscle, and suspensory ligament in the palmar metacarpal region of Icelandic Horses.

Animals—50 nonlame Icelandic Horses in training.

Procedures—Horses included 2 stallions, 30 geldings, and 18 mares from 4 to 20 years of age with a body mass index from 149.1 to 250.11 kg/m2. Transverse ultrasonographic images were obtained with an 8- to 10-MHz linear transducer and a standoff pad. In both forelimbs, the cross-sectional area, circumference, dorsopalmar width, and lateromedial width were measured 3 times at 5 regions of interest (ROIs).

Results—The coefficient of variation for all measurements of each ROI was < 5%. Comparisons were performed among and within structures and for each variable at all ROIs. Comparisons among horses revealed homogeneity because no significant influences of age, sex, height at the withers, or body mass index were found. Additionally, a characteristic skin condition interfering with ultrasonographic examination was observed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The morphometric values of the structures examined were consistent with those reported for other breeds, although some differences were observed.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the usefulness of multisite quantitative ultrasonography for noninvasive assessment of bone in horses.

Sample Population—12 healthy horses and both forelimbs from 8 clinically normal horses.

Procedure—For in vivo measurements, various regions of interest (ROI) were examined on the third metacarpal bone, radius, and tibia. Precision error for speed of sound (SOS) measurements was obtained by measuring each ROI of 4 horses 10 times with probe repositioning. Additionally, 3 operators measured each aspect of the third metacarpal bone of 6 horses 5 times each. For ex vivo measurements, third metacarpal bones were examined at 9 ROI, and SOS measurements were performed before and after soft tissue removal. One ROI of a single forelimb was subjected to 96 ex vivo measurements with 3 different contact media.

Results—The lateral aspect of the third metacarpal bone had significantly higher SOS values than the dorsal and medial aspect of the third metacarpal bone. No difference was obtained between SOS values of the lateral and medial aspect of the radius. The tibia had significantly higher SOS values than the lateral aspect of the radius and the dorsal and medial aspect of the third metacarpal bone. Intraoperator coefficients of variation ranged from 0.62 to 3.15%, and interoperator coefficients of variation ranged from 0.78 to 2.70%. Values of SOS were highest when silicone oil was used as the contact medium.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Speed of sound measurements obtained by quantitative ultrasonography in axial transmission mode can be used to precisely measure superficial cortical bone properties of third metacarpal bone, radius, and tibia in horses. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1464–1469)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a human assay for quantification of carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I), assess the influence of age on plasma CTX-I concentration, investigate the relationship between plasma CTX-I and serum osteocalcin concentrations, and determine whether concentrations of plasma CTX-I or serum osteocalcin fluctuate in circadian manner in horses.

Horses—75 clinically normal horses.

Procedure—Cross-reactivity between equine serum CTX-I and CTX-I antibodies in an automated electrochemiluminescent sandwich antibody assay (ECLIA) was evaluated via a specificity test (ie, dilution test) and recovery calculation. Serum osteocalcin concentration was measured with an equine-specific osteocalcin radioimmunoassay. To analyze diurnal variations in plasma CTX-I and serum osteocalcin concentrations, blood samples were obtained hourly during a 24-hour period.

Results—Results of the dilution test indicated good correlation ( r > 0.99) between expected serum CTX-I concentrations and measured serum CTX-I concentrations. The calculated CTX-I recovery was 97.6% to 109.9%. Plasma CTX-I and serum osteocalcin concentrations were correlated. Plasma CTX-I concentration was inversely correlated with age of the horse. No significant circadian variations in plasma CTX-I and serum osteocalcin concentrations were detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that the fully automated CTX-I ECLIA can be used for evaluation of plasma and serum samples from horses and may be a useful tool to monitor bone metabolism changes. Horses in this study did not have notable diurnal fluctuations in serum osteocalcin and plasma CTX-I concentrations. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:104–109)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research