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  • Author or Editor: Bettina Dunkel x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes in equine platelets and evaluate their influence on platelet adhesion.

Sample Population—Platelets obtained from healthy New Forest Pony geldings that ranged from 12 to 20 years of age (mean ± SEM, 17.3 ± 1.1 years).

Procedures—PDE isoenzyme activity in equine platelets was determined by use of a 2-step radioactive assay. Functional importance of PDE isoenzymes was established by use of selective inhibitors in a colorimetric adhesion assay.

Results—PDE1, PDE2, PDE3, and PDE5 and small amounts of PDE4 were found in equine platelets. Inhibition of PDE3 abolished platelet adhesion almost completely, whereas inhibition of PDE4 and PDE5 had little effect.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Function of equine platelets can be influenced by inhibition of PDE3. Selective PDE3 inhibitors may be clinically useful to regulate platelet function. They offer the advantage of increased potency with fewer adverse effects, compared with those for nonselective PDE inhibitors.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether expression of equine platelet activation–dependent surface markers is influenced by phospodiesterase (PDE) isoenzyme activity and whether antigen challenge alters platelet PDE activity in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO).

Animals—16 horses.

Procedures—7 healthy horses were used for in vitro experiments, 6 horses with RAO were used for antigen challenge, and 6 healthy horses were used as control animals. Three of the healthy horses had also been used in the in vitro experiments. Effects of PDE inhibition and activation of adenylyl cyclase on CD41/61 and CD62P expression on platelets and platelet-neutrophil aggregate formation in vitro were investigated via flow cytometry. Platelet PDE activity and sensitivity to inhibition of PDE3 and PDE5 isoenzymes were examined in horses with RAO and control horses before and after antigen challenge.

Results—Inhibition of PDE or activation of adenylyl cyclase significantly inhibited stimulus-induced expression of CD41/61 and CD62P (by approx 94% and 40%, respectively) and percentage of CD62P positive cells (by approx 30%). Only the PDE3 inhibitor, trequinsin, caused a significant (53%) reduction in platelet-neutrophil aggregate formation. Platelet PDE activity decreased following antigen challenge in RAO-affected horses and control horses. In horses with RAO, a significant increase in sensitivity of platelet PDE to inhibition by the PDE5 inhibitor zaprinast was observed after 5 hours.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results provided further evidence that PDE3 is an important regulator of equine platelet activation and suggested that changes in regulation of platelet PDE5 may contribute to antigen-induced response in horses with RAO.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To examine factors associated with short- and long-term prognosis for horses undergoing repeated celiotomy within 14 days after the first colic surgery.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—95 horses that had undergone 2 celiotomies within a 14-day period between 2005 and 2013 at 3 equine referral hospitals.

Procedures—Historical, clinical, and laboratory data were compared between horses that did not survive and horses that did survive to hospital discharge (short-term survival rate) and to > 3 and > 6 months after hospital discharge (long-term survival rates).

Results—Strangulating small intestinal lesions were the most common finding during the first celiotomy (60/95 [63.2%]), and persistent gastric reflux was the most common reason for the second celiotomy (56/95 [58.9%]). Reasons for a second celiotomy were not associated with survival rate. For horses that had long-term follow-up, 22 of 92 (23.9%) survived > 6 months after hospital discharge. Two of 13 horses with intestinal resections during both surgeries survived to > 6 months after hospital discharge. Compared with horses not undergoing intestinal resection, significantly fewer horses requiring resection during 1 or both surgeries survived to hospital discharge and to > 3 and > 6 months after hospital discharge. Incisional infections occurred in 68.4% (26/38) of horses that survived to hospital discharge, and 31.6% (12/38) developed incisional hernias or dehiscence.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that the prognosis for horses undergoing repeated celiotomy is guarded, and intestinal resection negatively affects the long-term survival rate.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To create a mathematical model to assist in early prediction of the probability of discharge in hospitalized foals ≤ 7 days old.

Study Design—Prospective study.

Animals—1,073 foals.

Procedures—Medical records from 910 hospitalized foals ≤ 7 days old for which outcome was recorded as died or discharged alive were reviewed. Thirty-four variables including historical information, physical examination findings, and laboratory results were examined for association with survival. Variables associated with being discharged alive were entered into a multivariable logistic regression model. Accuracy of the model was validated prospectively on data from 163 foals.

Results—Factors in the final model included age group, ability to stand, presence of a suckle reflex, WBC count, serum creatinine concentration, and anion gap. Sensitivity and specificity of the model to predict live discharge were 92% and 74%, respectively, in the retrospective population and 90% and 46%, respectively, in the prospective population. Accuracy of an equine clinician's initial prediction of the foal being discharged alive was 83%, and accuracy of the model's prediction was 81%. Combining the clinician's prediction of probability of live discharge with that of the model significantly increased (median increase, 12%) the accuracy of the prediction for foals that were discharged and nonsignificantly decreased (median decrease, 9%) the accuracy of the predication for nonsurvivors.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Combining the clinician's initial predication of the probability of a foal being discharged alive with that of the model appeared to provide a more precise early estimate of the probability of live discharge for hospitalized foals.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association