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Abstract

Objective—To assess perioperative findings and postoperative complications and outcomes in dogs that had ectopic thyroid carcinomas with invasion into the hyoid apparatus and underwent tumor excision with partial hyoidectomy.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—5 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that had an ectopic neuroendocrine tumor with invasion into the hyoid apparatus and underwent tumor excision with partial hyoidectomy were reviewed for information regarding perioperative and postoperative findings and outcome. During surgery in each case, the thyrohyoid and ceratohyoid or epihyoid bones (depending on degree of hyoid apparatus involvement) were sharply transected, allowing en bloc removal of the tumor. The ipsilateral cut ends of the thyrohyoid and ceratohyoid or epihyoid bones (depending on which was cut) were sutured together with polypropylene suture in a simple interrupted pattern.

Results—All partial hyoidectomy procedures were completed without surgical or anesthetic complications. All 5 dogs were able to eat and drink between 7 and 24 hours after surgery, with no signs of dysphagia, ptyalism, or abnormal tongue carriage. Follow-up information was obtained over a period of 173 to 587 days after surgery for all 5 dogs; 4 dogs were still alive at last follow-up. One dog was euthanized 587 days after surgery because of lethargy, inappetence, and hypercalcemia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—From this limited series of cases, results suggested that partial resection of the hyoid apparatus during removal of ectopic thyroid carcinoma may be tolerated well and be associated with very good functional outcomes in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2014;245:1319–1324)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the macroscopic effects of topical application of taurolidine on second intention healing of experimentally induced wounds in rats.

Animals—32 adult Sprague-Dawley female rats.

Procedures—In each rat, 2 skin wounds were created in the lumbar area. Groups of 7 rats were assigned to have 1 wound treated topically with hydroxycellulose gel (HDCG), 2% taurolidine in HDCG (T-HDCG), 2% taurolidine–sodium citrate solution, or bacitracin-neomycin-polymyxin B ointment; the other wound was not treated. Four control rats (8 untreated wounds) were used. Wounds were monitored for contraction, epithelialization, and complete healing at 4, 8, and 14 days after wound creation. The number of days to complete healing was also recorded for each wound.

Results—Compared with other treatments or untreated wounds, wounds treated with T-HDCG had decreased total healing at day 8 and decreased epithelialization and decreased total healing at day 14. Wounds treated with T-HDCG required approximately 3 days longer to completely heal than all other treated and untreated wounds. Application of bacitracinneomycin-polymyxin B ointment did not enhance wound healing. Mean time to complete healing of untreated wounds in all treatment and control groups was 10.00 to 10.14 days.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In rats, topical application of T-HDCG to wounds had a negative effect on second intention healing by delaying the epithelialization process. In mammals, generally, wounds treated topically with taurolidine may need to be treated and monitored for a longer period than other wounds treated with other common woundhealing compounds or untreated wounds.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine survival times of selected dogs with metastatic (stage III) osteosarcoma, whether disease-free interval (DFI) was associated with survival time after diagnosis of stage III disease (ie, stage III survival time), and whether a survival benefit of metastasectomy existed.

DESIGN Retrospective case series with nested cohort study.

ANIMALS 194 client-owned dogs treated for histologically confirmed appendicular osteosarcoma from 1997 through 2009.

PROCEDURES Dogs were included if they had stage I or II osteosarcoma at the time of initial evaluation, had amputation of the affected appendage and ≥ 1 dose of chemotherapy afterward, and developed metastasis within the follow-up period or prior to death. Data collected from the medical records included signalment, primary tumor location, clinical and laboratory findings, whether metastasectomy was performed, and outcome. Various factors were examined for associations with outcome.

RESULTS Dogs that received no treatment for the metastasis had a median survival time between 49 and 57 days after diagnosis of stage III osteosarcoma. Duration of the preceding DFI had no association with this period. Metastasectomy alone was associated with a longer median stage III survival time (232 days) than no metastasectomy (49 days). Among all dogs identified as qualifying for pulmonary metastasectomy on the basis of < 3 pulmonary nodules visible on thoracic radiographs and a DFI > 275 days (n = 21), a survival advantage was also identified for those that actually received pulmonary metastasectomy (6).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Preceding DFI had no influence on survival time of dogs with stage III osteosarcoma. Metastasectomy was associated with an increase in survival time for selected dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects that routine histologic processing has on the dimensions of samples of normal skin of dogs and assess whether the inclusion of a muscle or fascial layer in such samples alters those effects.

Sample Population—Skin samples obtained from 6 medium-sized adult dogs with grossly normal skin.

Procedure—From each dog, skin samples (with or without underlying fascia or muscle) were obtained from 3 sites bilaterally (6 samples/dog) and processed routinely for histologic evaluation; their dimensions were measured at intervals during the experiment.

Results—As a result of processing, skin samples decreased in size (combined percentage change in length and width) and increased in thickness, compared with their original dimensions. Samples without fascia or muscle decreased in size by 21.1% to 32.0% and increased in thickness by 45.1% to 75.8%. The site of sample origin influenced processing-associated changes in sample size but did not affect the change in thickness. Decreases in dimensions did not vary with inclusion of fascia but did vary with inclusion of muscle. The change in thickness did not vary with inclusion of a layer of fascia or muscle.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Processing of skin samples obtained from dogs for histologic evaluation can cause changes in sample dimensions; samples may decrease in length and width by as much as 32% and increase in thickness by 75.8%, compared with their original dimensions. The presence of muscle in canine skin samples can restrict the amount of shrinkage in length or width associated with processing. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:500–505)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—3 alpaca crias and cadavers of an alpaca cria and a llama cria were evaluated for evidence of esophageal dysfunction.

Clinical Findings—All 5 crias were between 3 and 5 months of age when clinical signs developed, and all had a thin body condition when examined. Clinical signs included coughing, regurgitation, and grossly visible esophageal peristaltic waves. A barium esophagram was used to diagnose esophageal obstruction, megaesophagus, and a vascular ring anomaly (VRA). Fluoroscopy was used to evaluate deglutition, esophageal peristalsis, and the extent of esophageal dilation in 1 alpaca cria. A persistent right aortic arch was identified in 1 alpaca cria, and a left aortic arch with right ductus arteriosus or ligamentum arteriosum and an aberrant right subclavian artery were identified in the 4 remaining crias.

Treatment and Outcome—Surgical correction of the VRA was attempted in the 3 live alpaca crias. It was complicated by the conformation and location of each VRA and inaccurate anatomic diagnosis of the VRAs before surgery. Treatment was universally unsuccessful because of intraoperative complications and the persistence of clinical signs after surgery.

Clinical Relevance—Megaesophagus is typically an idiopathic condition in camelids. However, these findings suggested that camelids with esophageal dysfunction during the neonatal period may have a VRA. The prognosis is grave for camelids with VRA, and accurate anatomic diagnosis of the VRA via the use of advanced imaging techniques (eg, angiography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging) may improve the success of surgical intervention.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether hematologic and serum biochemical values for blood samples obtained from cats via vascular access ports (VAP) are comparable to those for samples obtained by direct venipuncture.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—14 healthy cats.

Procedure—A VAP was surgically implanted in a jugular vein in each cat. Blood samples were obtained from the VAP and by direct venipuncture of the contralateral jugular vein 10 weeks after VAP placement. Results of hematologic and serum biochemical analyses were compared by use of a paired t-test. The P value to reject the null hypothesis was adjusted to account for multiple comparisons by using the Bonferroni procedure in which the nominal P-to-reject value is divided by the number of comparisons (0.05/24 = 0.002).

Results—Paired samples (VAP and venipuncture) obtained 10 weeks after VAP placement were evaluated for each cat. Of the 24 measured analytes, only potassium, total protein, and albumin concentrations differed significantly (P < 0.001 for all 3) between VAP and venipuncture samples.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that samples obtained from VAP are suitable for routine hematologic monitoring of feline cancer patients. Sample hemolysis may account for a slight increase in potassium, total protein, and albumin concentrations obtained from VAP samples. However, the values of variables most critical for monitoring of patients receiving chemotherapy (ie, mature neutrophil and platelet counts) are comparable. If proper techniques are used, VAP may be used for administration of chemotherapy as well as for blood collection in cats undergoing cancer treatment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:482–485)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome for dogs with grade-II mast cell tumors treated with surgery alone.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—55 dogs.

Procedures—Medical records were examined, and signalment; location and size of tumor; staging status; dates of local recurrence, metastasis, death, or last follow-up examination; status of surgical margins; previous surgery; postoperative complications; and cause of death were recorded. Follow-up information was obtained via reexamination or telephone conversations with owners or referring veterinarians. Univariate analysis was performed to identify prognostic factors.

Results—60 tumors in 55 dogs were included. Median follow-up time was 540 days. Three (5%) mast cell tumors recurred locally; median time to local recurrence was 62 days. Six (11%) dogs developed another mast cell tumor at a different cutaneous location; median time to a different location was 240 days. Three (5%) dogs developed metastases; median time to metastasis was 158 days. Fourteen dogs died; 3 deaths were related to mast cell tumor, and 7 were unrelated. The relationship with mast cell tumor was not known for 4. Median survival times were 151, 841, and 827 days, respectively, for these 3 groups. Forty-six (84%) dogs were free of mast cell tumors during the study period. A reliable prognostic factor could not be identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that additional local treatment may not be required after complete excision of grade-II mast cell tumors and that most dogs do not require systemic treatment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:1120–1123)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate potential associations between surgical approach and complication rate, progression-free survival time, and disease-specific survival time in cats with mammary adenocarcinoma.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 107 client-owned cats.

PROCEDURES Medical records of cats that underwent surgical excision of mammary adenocarcinoma by means of a unilateral or bilateral (staged or single-session) mastectomy at 9 hospitals between 1991 and 2014 were reviewed. Relevant clinicopathologic data and details of surgical and adjuvant treatments were recorded. Outcome data were obtained, including postoperative complications, progression-free survival time, and disease-specific survival time.

RESULTS Complications occurred in 12 of 61 (19.7%) cats treated with unilateral mastectomy, 5 of 14 (35.7%) cats treated with staged bilateral mastectomy, and 13 of 32 (40.6%) cats treated with single-session bilateral mastectomy. Complications were significantly more likely to occur in cats undergoing bilateral versus unilateral mastectomy. Median progression-free survival time was longer for cats treated with bilateral mastectomy (542 days) than for cats treated with unilateral mastectomy (289 days). Significant risk factors for disease progression included unilateral mastectomy, tumor ulceration, lymph node metastasis, and tumors arising in the fourth mammary gland. Significant risk factors for disease-specific death included lymph node metastasis and development of regional or distant metastasis. Among cats that did not develop metastasis, unilateral mastectomy was a significant risk factor for disease-specific death. Treatment with chemotherapy was associated with a significantly decreased risk of disease-specific death.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results supported bilateral mastectomy for the treatment of mammary adenocarcinoma in cats to improve progression-free and disease-specific survival time. Performing bilateral mastectomy in a staged fashion may help to decrease the complication rate.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association