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  • Author or Editor: Bernadette Van Ryssen x
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SUMMARY

After a detailed anatomic study to determine puncture sites, 10 cadaver elbows from 5 dogs were examined arthroscopically to study the normal intraarticular anatomy, as viewed from the medial side. Subsequent dissection revealed absence of neurovascular injury and only minor iatrogenic damage to the cartilage. The technique was clinically applied and evaluated in 13 dogs (26 joints). The dogs recovered without complications. The technique proved to be safe and reliable for direct examination of nearly the entire joint. More specifically, it allowed systematic inspection of the medial and lateral humeral condyles, the medial and lateral coronoid processes, the caudal and middle parts of the head of the radius, the olecranon (including the anconeal process), and the medial collateral ligament.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary:

Twelve shoulders in 6 dogs with clinical and radiographic evidence of osteochondrosis were examined by magnetic resonance imaging performed on a 0.5-T superconductive system. Scans were obtained with 5-mm-thick slices and 0.75-mm pixel size. Unenhanced T1-weighted spin-echo and unenhanced T2*-weighted gradient-echo images were obtained, using a high-resolution surface coil. The T1-weighted sequences were repeated after iv injection of 0.1 mmol of gadopentetate dimeglumine/kg of body weight (0.2 ml/kg). In 6 joints, histologic examination of synovia and articular cartilage was carried out.

The magnetic resonance images were correlated with arthrographic, arthroscopic, and histologic findings. Magnetic resonance imaging was useful in evaluating the extent of subchondral lesions and the severity of inflammatory changes within the subchondral bone. Areas of low signal (visible subchondrally on T1-weighted images that were enhanced by administration of contrast medium) indicated active inflammatory changes within the subchondral bone. Although articular cartilage discontinuity could be detected, loose cartilage flaps could not always be reliably demonstrated. Signal inhomogeneity within the articular cartilage was presumed to correspond with zones of cartilage degeneration.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Six scapulohumeral joints (3 normal joints and 3 joints with radiographic evidence of osteochondrosis) underwent conventional magnetic resonance (mr) imaging and mr scapulohumeral arthrography to evaluate delineation of the articular cartilage. The mr arthrography was performed, using 5 ml of 500 μM gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-dtpa) as a contrast medium. Delineation of normal articular cartilage and cartilage defects was less accurate after intra-articular administration of Gd-dtpa. Therefore, it was concluded that mr arthrography with Gd-dtpa is unrewarding for evaluation of osteochondrosis lesions.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the accuracy of pressure plate kinetic asymmetry indices (ASIs) for diagnosis of unilateral hind limb lameness in dogs and their correlation with visual gait assessment (VGA) scores.

Animals—9 healthy dogs and 16 dogs with previously diagnosed unilateral rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament and concurrent unilateral hind limb lameness.

Procedures—Dogs were walked over a pressure plate to determine paw contact area (PCA), peak vertical pressure (PVP), peak vertical force (PVF), and vertical impulse (VI) of both hind limbs. An ASI was calculated for each gait variable. Simultaneously, gait was assessed visually and scored by use of a numeric rating scale (0 to 10). The ASI of each variable was tested for its usefulness in discrimination between lame and nonlame dogs and for correlation with VGA scores.

Results—Sensitivity and specificity of ASIs to discriminate between lame and nonlame dogs were excellent for PVF, VI, and PCA; these values were substantially lower for ASI of PVP. Cutoff values to discriminate between lame and nonlame dogs were determined by use of ASIs for PVF, VI, and PCA; however, this could not be done for ASI of PVP. Correlations between ASIs of PVF, VI, and PCA and VGA scores were higher than correlation between the ASIs of PVP and VGA scores.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that ASIs of PVF and VI determined via analysis of pressure plate measurements were reliable indicators of clinical lameness in dogs, but the ASI of PVP was not. The ASI of PCA is an interesting new variable for assessment of limb loading symmetry.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research