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  • Author or Editor: Baye G. Williamson x
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A 10-year-old 8.8-kg (19.4-lb) castrated male West Highland White Terrier (vaccination status, current) was evaluated because of acute progressive tetraparesis. The dog had been initially examined by the referring veterinarian because of intermittently frantic scratching at its face over a 2-day period. Forty-eight hours after examination by the referring veterinarian, acute paraparesis and hyperreflexive patellar reflexes were evident. Twelve hours later, spinal reflexes were absent in the pelvic limbs and decreased in the right thoracic limb. Deep pain sensation was intact in all 4 limbs, and there was full range of motion in the head and neck. At 72 hours

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 2-year-old 81-kg (178.2-lb) castrated male Neapolitan Mastiff was referred for evaluation after a sudden onset of nonambulatory paraparesis and spinal hyperesthesia. The dog had an approximately 1-year history of walking with a hunched posture and tenesmus, but no other reported abnormalities. The dog was brought to an emergency clinic immediately prior to the referral evaluation, where medical management included administration of hydromorphone hydrochloride (0.15 mg/kg [0.07 mg/lb], SC, once) and placement of a urinary catheter to empty the urinary bladder. The catheter was subsequently removed.

At the referral evaluation, the dog was in sternal recumbency and was able to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

An 11-month-old 3.66-kg (8.05-lb) castrated male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated because of a history of hypnic jerks since the owners acquired him. The cat had been found roadside at 2 weeks of age and had since been an indoor cat in a multicat household. Hypnic jerks are brief, myoclonic muscle twitches that occur at sleep onset occasionally in clinically normal individuals. This cat's hypnic jerks had progressed to focal seizures with impaired consciousness 4 months prior to evaluation. The seizures involved sudden bursts of violent activity and altered consciousness. Initially, seizures occurred several weeks apart but increased in frequency

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association