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  • Author or Editor: Barry G. Harmon x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) or a hyaluronate-carboxymethylcellulose membrane (HA membrane) on healing of the small intestine in horses.

Animals—18 healthy adult horses.

Procedure—Midline celiotomy and 2 jejunal resection- and-anastomosis surgeries were performed. In treated horses, SCMC (n = 6) or a HA membrane (6) was applied to the jejunum to cover the anastomosis. There were 6 untreated control horses. Horses were euthanatized 10 days after surgery. For each horse, 1 anastomosis was used for histologic examination, and the second was used to determine intestinal bursting strength. Intestinal bursting tension, serosal granulation tissue, serosal fibrin deposition, and width of the fibrous seal at the anastomosis were compared among groups.

Results—3 control horses had adhesions associated with the anastomosis, but none of the treated horses had adhesions associated with the anastomosis. Mean thickness of fibrin deposited on the serosal surfaces for the SCMC and HA-membrane groups was significantly less than that for control horses. Mean thickness of serosal granulation tissue, width of fibrous seal between inverted musculature, inflammatory cell infiltrate scores, and bursting tension did not differ significantly among groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of SCMC or application of a HA membrane to small intestinal anastomoses in horses resulted in fewer adhesions and decreased fibrin deposition, and it did not adversely affect anastomotic healing. In horses at increased risk for intra-abdominal adhesions, SCMC or application of HA membranes may decrease the frequency of adhesions without adversely affecting healing of small intestinal anastomoses. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:369–374)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate in vivo activityin dogs of meloxicam or aspirin, previously shown in vitro to be a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor (COX-1 sparing drug), or a nonselective COX inhibitor, respectively.

Animals—12 male dogs with unilateral osteoarthritis of the stifle joint.

Procedure—Each dog was treated in a crossover design with aspirin or meloxicam for 21 days. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations were measured at days 0 (baseline), 7, and 21 of each treatment period in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated blood, synovial fluid collected by arthrocentesis, and endoscopic gastric mucosal biopsy specimens. Thromboxane B2 (TXB2) was evaluated in blood on days 0, 7, and 21 of each treatment period.

Results—Aspirin administration significantly suppressed PGE2 concentrations in blood, gastric mucosa, synovial fluid, and suppressed TXB2 concentration in blood at days 7 and 21. Meloxicam administration significantly suppressed PGE2 concentrations in blood and synovial fluid at days 7 and 21, but had no effect on concentrations of TXB2 in blood or PGE2 in gastric mucosa. Suppression of LPS-stimulated PGE2 concentrations in blood and synovial fluid by aspirin and meloxicam administration is consistent with activity against the COX-2 isoenzyme. Suppression of concentrations of PGE2 in the gastric mucosa and TXB2 in blood by aspirin administration is consistent with activity against COX-1. Meloxicam, in contrast, had a minimal effect on functions mediated by COX-1.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Meloxicam acts in vivo in dogs as a COX-1 sparing drug on target tissues by sparing gastric PGE2 synthesis while retaining antiprostaglandin effects within inflamed joints. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1527–1531)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the outcomes of doublelayer inverting anastomosis (DIA), single-layer anastomosis (SLA), and single-layer anastomosis combined with a hyaluronate membrane (SLA+HA-membrane) with respect to stomal diameter, adhesion formation, surgery time, and anastomotic healing in horses.

Animals—18 adult horses.

Procedure—Midline celiotomy and end-to-end anastomoses were performed. In control horses (n = 6), DIA was performed; in treated horses, SLA was performed (6) or SLA+HA-membrane was performed (6). Horses were euthanatized 21 days after surgery. Abdominal adhesions were evaluated grossly and histologically. Stomal diameters were measured ultrasonographically and compared with adjacent luminal diameters. Anastomotic healing was evaluated histologically for fibrosis and inflammation, tissue alignment, and inversion. Surgery times were recorded for the anastomotic procedure and compared among groups.

Results—There were significantly more adhesions in the SLA group, compared with the DIA and SLA+HAmembrane groups. Reduction in stomal diameters in the DIA group was significantly greater than the SLA and SLA+HA-membrane groups. Surgery times for the DIA group were significantly greater than the SLA and SLA+HA-membrane groups. Histologic findings of fibrosis, inflammation, and mucosal healing were similar among groups. There was significant tissue inversion in the DIA group, compared with the 2 treatment groups. Tissue alignment was not different among groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of a SLA+HA-membrane was an effective small intestinal anastomotic technique. This technique was faster to perform and resulted in a larger stomal diameter, compared with the DIA technique and significantly fewer perianastomotic adhesions, compared with the SLA technique. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1314–1319)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research