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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 10-year-old castrated male Siberian Husky that had undergone complete excision of an oral plasmacytoma was evaluated because of development of a large oronasal fistula following failure of primary defect repair.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Clinical examination findings for the dog were unremarkable. The dog was receiving nutrition via an esophagostomy tube, which had been placed at the time of mass excision. The dog was notably head shy. Intraoral examination following sedation revealed a large (approx 25 × 20-mm) oronasal fistula, which was oriented craniocaudally in the long axis and located at the rostral aspect of the soft palate. Maturation of tissues had been allowed following failure of the primary repair, and an epithelialized border was identified circumferentially.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

10 weeks after mass excision, revision surgery involving 2-layer closure augmented with a polydioxanone plate was performed. At a recheck examination 21 days after revision surgery, near-complete healing of the closure site with no repair compromise was evident, and the dog had returned to oral food intake. A follow-up evaluation 40 weeks later revealed complete healing, with a single 1-mm defect at the medial aspect of the left maxillary dental arcade, as a result of suspected repeated trauma at the level of teeth 209 and 210. This defect was not associated with any clinical abnormalities.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The outcome for this dog indicated that use of a polydioxanone plate offers a means of robust, long-lasting, and absorbable augmentation of a traditional 2-layer repair of an oronasal fistula in this species.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the radiographic appearance of small and large intestines of cats with various medical conditions and create a quantitative index for interpretation of intestinal diameters on radiographic views of the abdomen.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—74 cats that underwent abdominal radiography.

Procedures—Cats were assigned to 1 of 4 diagnosis categories: no gastrointestinal tract disease (n = 20), nonobstructive gastrointestinal tract disease (32), linear foreign body (LFB; 11), and small intestinal mechanical obstruction not caused by an LFB (11). Abdominal radiographs were evaluated without knowledge of history or diagnosis. Maximum and minimum external small intestine diameter (SID) and colon diameter (CD) were compared; dorsoventral and mediolateral measurements of the cranial end plate of L2 (VEL2) and L5 vertebrae were com-pared. Dorsoventral height of VEL2 from lateral radiographic views was used to determine maximum-SID:VEL2 and maximum-CD:VEL2 ratios. Gas patterns were evaluated.

Results—Nonobstructive gastrointestinal tract disease was more likely than obstruction until a maximum-SID:VEL2 ratio > 2.0. At a maximum-SID:VEL2 ratio of 2.5, probability of a disease not related to the intestinal tract was < 4%. At a maximum-SID:VEL2 ratio of 3.0, probability of a mechanical intestinal obstruction was > 70%. When the maximum-CD:VEL2 ratio was 2.0, probability of LFB was 50%; as the maximum-CD:VEL2 ratio increased beyond 2.0, likelihood of LFB decreased. Both gas pattern and CD correlated with diagnosis category.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Normalizing ratios of maximum-SID:VEL2 and maximum-CD:VEL2 obtained from measurements on lateral radiographic views of the abdomen in cats were related to diagnosis category.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine survival time and quality of life of dogs that developed postattenuation neurologic signs (PANS) after surgical treatment of a single congenital portosystemic shunt and survived at least 30 days and identify whether neurologic signs present at the time of discharge would resolve or reoccur.

ANIMALS

50 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were retrospectively reviewed, and follow-up data relating to neurologic signs and seizure activity were obtained. Owners were asked to complete a questionnaire related to the presence of neurologic signs, including seizures, and their dog’s quality of life.

RESULTS

Thirty of the 50 (60%) dogs had postattenuation seizures with or without other nonseizure neurologic signs, and 20 (40%) had neurologic signs other than seizures. Neurologic signs had fully resolved by the time of discharge in 24 (48%) dogs. Signs resolved in 18 of the remaining 26 (69%) dogs that still had PANS other than seizures at the time of discharge. Seizures reoccurred in 15 of the 30 dogs that had postattenuation seizures. Twenty-seven of 33 (82%) owners graded their dog’s long-term (> 30 days after surgery) quality-of-life as high. Forty-five (90%) dogs survived > 6 months. Most (29/43 [67%]) neurologic signs (other than seizures) present at the time of hospital discharge resolved.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings highlighted that survival times of > 6 months and a high QOL can be achieved in most dogs with PANS that survive at least 30 days. Most neurologic signs other than seizures resolved within 1 month postoperatively. Half of the dogs with postattenuation seizures had a reoccurrence.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association