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  • Author or Editor: Barbara A. Byrne x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effectiveness of a commercial conventional blood culture system (BCS), a commercial resin-containing BCS, and a commercial lysis-centrifugation–based BCS for the recovery of Escherichia coli from equine blood samples inoculated with that organism.

Sample Population—Samples of blood obtained from a clinically normal horse that were inoculated with E coli.

Procedures—Blood samples were aseptically collected and inoculated with an E coli specimen (50 CFUs/mL) that had been previously isolated from a foal with sepsis. Subsequently, samples were spiked with gentamicin at a concentration of 30 μg/mL, and 10 mL of each mixture was inoculated into 1 bottle or tube of each BCS. Samples were processed and incubated according to the manufacturer's guidelines and inoculated onto 5% sheep blood agar plates. Plated samples were examined macroscopically at regular intervals for as long as 72 hours. Detection of E coli and time to detection were recorded for each medium.

Results—Detection frequency of E coli was significantly greater by use of the resin-containing BCS (14/23 bottles) than that achieved by use of the conventional BCS (7/23 bottles) or the lysis-centrifugation–based BCS (0/10 tubes). Mean detection time (6 hours after plating) did not differ between the BCS with conventional medium and the BCS with resincontaining medium.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that a BCS with resin-containing medium may provide clinical benefit in the successful recovery of E coli from the blood of foals with sepsis that have been previously administered gentamicin.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the pharmacokinetics of danofloxacin following IM administration of a single dose (10 mg/kg) in koi (Cyprinus carpio).

ANIMALS

69 healthy adult koi housed in a 980-L flow-through-system tank.

PROCEDURES

3 fish were kept as untreated controls, and the remaining 66 fish were assigned to 11 treatment groups with 6 fish/group. Fish in the treatment groups were given a single dose of danofloxacin (10 mg/kg) IM in the left epaxial musculature. Fifteen, 30, and 45 minutes and 1, 4, 12, 24, 72, 96, 120, and 144 hours after administration of danofloxacin, fish in each treatment group were euthanized, and blood samples and samples of liver, spleen, gill, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, skin and muscle, and scales were collected. Plasma and tissue drug concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, and noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Tissues from the untreated control fish and fish euthanized 144 hours after danofloxacin administration were examined histologically.

RESULTS

Maximum plasma concentration (mean, 8,315.7 ng/mL) was reached approximately 45 minutes after danofloxacin administration; plasma elimination half-life was 15 hours. Danofloxacin was detected in all examined tissues from all 6 fish euthanized 15 minutes after drug administration and was detected in some tissues from 3 of the 6 fish euthanized 144 hours after drug administration. For all tissues, results of histologic examination were unremarkable.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

IM administration of a single dose (10 mg/kg) of danofloxacin in koi resulted in rapid absorption, with maximum plasma concentration reached approximately 45 minutes after drug administration; the drug could still be detected in some tissues 144 hours after administration.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects at the injection site of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA) following IM administration of 1 dose to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

ANIMALS 7 adult nonreleasable healthy red-tailed hawks.

PROCEDURES In a randomized crossover study, CCFA (10 or 20 mg/kg) was administered IM to each hawk and blood samples were obtained. After a 2-month washout period, administration was repeated with the opposite dose. Muscle biopsy specimens were collected from the injection site 10 days after each sample collection period. Pharmacokinetic data were calculated. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of ceftiofur for various bacterial isolates were assessed.

RESULTS Mean peak plasma concentrations of ceftiofur-free acid equivalent were 6.8 and 15.1 μg/mL for the 10 and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively. Mean times to maximum plasma concentration were 6.4 and 6.7 hours, and mean terminal half-lives were 29 and 50 hours, respectively. Little to no muscle inflammation was identified. On the basis of a target MIC of 1 μg/mL and target plasma ceftiofur concentration of 4 μg/mL, dose administration frequencies for infections with gram-negative and gram-positive organisms were estimated as every 36 and 45 hours for the 10 mg/kg dose and every 96 and 120 hours for the 20 mg/kg dose, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Study results suggested that CCFA could be administered IM to red-tailed hawks at 10 or 20 mg/kg to treat infections with ceftiofur-susceptible bacteria. Administration resulted in little to no inflammation at the injection site. Additional studies are needed to evaluate effects of repeated CCFA administration.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—6 lactating dairy goats were examined because of acute mastitis.

Clinical Findings—Goats were considered to have endotoxemia on the basis of physical examination and clinicopathologic findings. The affected udder halves had gangrenous discolored distal portions with sharp demarcations from grossly normal tissue proximally. Udder secretions from the affected sides were serosanguineous in all cases. A Bacillus sp was isolated in pure cultures in all cases. In 1 case, the Bacillus sp was identified as Bacillus cereus.

Treatment and Outcome—Goats were treated for mastitis and endotoxemia with polyionic IV fluid therapy, systemic and intramammary antimicrobial administration, anti-inflammatory drug administration, and other supportive treatment. All goats survived to discharge. All except 1 goat had follow-up information available. The affected udder halves sloughed in 1 to 2 months following discharge. In subsequent lactations after the mastitis episodes, milk production in 2 of 5 goats was above the mean, as determined on the basis of Dairy Herd Improvement records, and 3 of 5 goats were voluntarily withdrawn from lactation. All 5 goats had successful kiddings after the Bacillus mastitis episode.

Conclusions and Clinical RelevanceBacillus sp should be considered as a causative agent in goats with gangrenous mastitis, especially when the Bacillus sp is isolated in a pure culture. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing is recommended for selection of an appropriate antimicrobial for treatment. Prognosis for survival appears to be good, although milk production may be decreased.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects following SC administration of ceftiofur crystalline free acid (CCFA) in New Zealand White rabbits.

ANIMALS 6 adult sexually intact female New Zealand White rabbits.

PROCEDURES Each rabbit was administered 40 mg of CCFA/kg SC. A blood sample was obtained immediately before (0 minutes), at 5 and 30 minutes after, and at 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, 95, 120, 144, and 168 hours after administration, and plasma concentrations of ceftiofur free acid equivalents (CFAE) were measured. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. For each rabbit, body weight, food consumption, fecal output, and injection site were monitored. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of ceftiofur for 293 bacterial isolates from rabbit clinical samples were determined.

RESULTS Mean ± SD peak plasma concentration of CFAE and time to maximum plasma concentration were 33.13 ± 10.15 μg/mL and 1.75 ± 0.42 hours, respectively. The mean terminal half-life of CFAE was 42.6 ± 5.2 hours. Plasma CFAE concentration was > 4 μg/mL for approximately 24 hours and > 1 μg/mL for at least 72 hours after CCFA administration. An apparently nonpainful subcutaneous nodule developed at the injection site in 3 of 6 rabbits.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that CCFA (40 mg/kg) could be administered SC every 24 to 72 hours to New Zealand White rabbits to treat infections with ceftiofur-susceptible bacteria. Single-dose administration of CCFA resulted in minimal adverse effects. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the effects of repeated CCFA administration in New Zealand White rabbits.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

An 8-year-old sexually intact female eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus) with a 4-day history of hyporexia and lethargy and a 1-day history of tenesmus was examined.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Severe leukocytosis characterized by severe heterophilia and moderate monocytosis was present. Marked dilation of the proventriculus and ventriculus and ascites were identified by means of radiography, coelomic ultrasonography, and contrast-enhanced CT, with no clinically relevant motility noted on ultrasonography. Results of coelomic fluid analysis were consistent with pyogranulomatous effusion. Endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract following proventricular and ventricular lavage showed a thick caseous plaque occupying 30% of the caudal proventricular mucosa. Abundant yeast organisms were evident during cytologic examination of a proventricular and ventricular wash sample, and fecal culture yielded Candida glabrata.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

The bird was treated with SC fluids, assisted feedings, nystatin, fluconazole, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid, enrofloxacin, gastroprotectants, maropitant, and analgesics and slowly improved during hospitalization. A marked decrease in proventricular dilation was evident on serial radiographs obtained over a 12-month period. One year after diagnosis, the bird was presented with a 1-week history of hyporexia and lethargy, and fecal culture grew C glabrata. Antifungal treatment was resumed for 3 months. The bird had no clinical signs of infection 16 months after this recurrence, and subsequent fecal cultures were negative for fungal growth.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings illustrate the importance of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in diagnosing proventricular and ventricular dilation in birds and emphasize the need for long-term antifungal treatment and monitoring in birds with fungal infections.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the performance of a veterinary urine dipstick paddle (UDP) for diagnosis and identification of urinary tract infection (UTI) in dogs and cats.

Design—Prospective, randomized, blinded study.

Sample—207 urine specimens.

Procedures—UDPs were inoculated by 2 investigators and incubated according to manufacturer's instructions. Results, including presence or absence of bacterial growth, organism counts, and identification of uropathogens, were compared between investigators and with microbiology laboratory results. A subset of UDPs with bacterial growth was submitted to the laboratory for confirmation.

Results—The laboratory reported 64 (30.9%) specimens had growth of bacteria. Bacterial growth was reported for 63 (30.4%) and 58 (28.0%) of the UDPs by investigators 1 and 2, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of the UDP for detection of bacterial growth were 97.3% and 98.6%, respectively, for investigator 1 and 89.1% and 99.3%, respectively, for investigator 2. For UPDs with ≥ 105 colony-forming units/mL, organism counts correlated well between the laboratory and investigators 1 (r = 0.95) and 2 (r = 0.89). Pathogen identification was not always accurate. Only 25 of 33 (75.8%) UDPs submitted for confirmation yielded bacteria consistent with those isolated from the original bacterial culture of urine.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The veterinary UDP system was a sensitive test for screening patients for bacterial UTI, but uropathogen identification was not always accurate. When UDPs have bacterial growth, a fresh urine specimen should be submitted to the laboratory to confirm the identity of the organisms and to permit antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA) following SC administration of a single dose to sheep.

Animals—9 healthy adult female Suffolk-crossbred sheep.

Procedures—Each sheep was administered 6.6 mg of CCFA/kg, SC, in the cervical region once. Serial blood samples were collected at predetermined intervals for 14 days. Serum concentration of ceftiofur free-acid equivalents (CFAE) was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by compartmental and noncompartmental methods.

Results—Pharmacokinetics for CCFA following SC administration in sheep was best described with a 1-compartment model. Mean ± SD area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity, peak serum concentration, and time to peak serum concentration were 206.6 ± 24.8 μ•h/mL, 2.4 ± 0.5 μg/mL, and 23.1 ± 10.1 h, respectively. Serum CFAE concentrations ≥ 1 μg/mL (the target serum CFAE concentration for treatment of disease caused by Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida) were maintained for 2.6 to 4.9 days. No significant adverse reactions to CCFA administration were observed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that adequate therapeutic serum concentrations of CFAE for treatment of disease caused by M haemolytica and P multocida were achieved in sheep following SC administration of a single dose (6.6 mg/kg) of CCFA. Thus, CCFA might be useful for the treatment of common respiratory tract pathogens in sheep.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research