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  • Author or Editor: Arthur L. Craigmill x
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Abstract

Objective—To compare the in vitro imMunosuppressive effects of cyclosporine and 4 novel immunosuppressive drugs on lymphocytes in whole blood collected from healthy cats.

Sample Population—Whole blood samples collected from 10 healthy adult domestic shorthair cats.

Procedure—Mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation in whole blood incubated with and without various concentrations of cyclosporine, tacrolimus, sirolimus, mycophenolic acid (MPA), or A771726 was measured by use of [3H]thymidine incorporation. Drug concentrations that resulted in a 50% inhibition of mitogen-induced proliferation (IC50) were calculated. Lymphocyte viability was determined by use of the trypan blue dye exclusion method.

Results—An obvious dose-response relationship for the antiproliferative effects of each drug was detected. Mean IC50 determined with concanavalin A was 46 nMfor cyclosporine, 9 nMfor tacrolimus, 12 nM for sirolimus, 16 nM for MPA, and 30 mM for A771726, whereas with pokeweed mitogen, mean IC50 was 33 nM for cyclosporine, 5 nMfor tacrolimus, 15 nM for sirolimus, 14 nM for mycophenolic acid, and 25 mM for A771726. Mitogen-stimulated and nonstimulated lymphocytes remained viable, regardless of drug evaluated.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tacrolimus, sirolimus, MPA, and A771726 inhibited in vitro mitogen- stimulated proliferation of feline lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner. These novel immunosuppressive drugs may be useful for management of immune-mediated inflamMatory diseases and prevention and treatment of rejection in cats that undergo organ transplantation. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 906–909)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To develop a flow-limited, physiologicbased pharmacokinetic model for use in estimating concentrations of sulfamethazine after IV administration to swine.

Sample Population—4 published studies provided physiologic values for organ weights, blood flows, clearance, and tissue-to-blood partition coefficients, and 3 published studies provided data on plasma and other tissue compartments for model validation.

Procedure—For the parent compound, the model included compartments for blood, adipose, muscle, liver, and kidney tissue with an extra compartment representing the remaining carcass. Compartments for the N-acetyl metabolite included the liver and the remaining body. The model was created and optimized by use of computer software. Sensitivity analysis was completed to evaluate the importance of each constant on the whole model. The model was validated and used to estimate a withhold interval after an IV injection at a dose of 50 mg/kg. The withhold interval was compared to the interval estimated by the Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD).

Results—Specific tissue correlations for plasma, adipose, muscle, kidney, and liver tissue compartments were 0.93, 0.86, 0.99, 0.94, and 0.98, respectively. The model typically overpredicted concentrations at early time points but had excellent accuracy at later time points. The withhold interval estimated by use of the model was 120 hours, compared with 100 hours estimated by FARAD.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of this model enabled accurate prediction of sulfamethazine pharmacokinetics in swine and has applications for food safety and prediction of drug residues in edible tissues. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1686–1693)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of common respiratory tract pathogens from sheep and goats.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Sample Population—41 respiratory tract isolates from sheep and 36 isolates from goats.

Procedures—Disk diffusion assay was used to determine antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, ciprofloxacin, florfenicol, and tetracycline. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of florfenicol for these isolates were determined by use of the microbroth dilution technique.

Results—The most common isolates were Pasteurella multocida (n = 28) and Mannheimia haemolytica (39). All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, ciprofloxacin, and florfenicol. Five percent (4/77) of isolates were resistant to tetracycline.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Susceptibility of respiratory tract pathogens isolated from sheep and goats to commonly used antimicrobial drugs in this study was high. Treatment of these species for bacterial respiratory tract disease is likely not complicated by antimicrobial resistance.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics of ceftiofur sodium after IM and SC administration in green iguanas.

Animals—6 male and 4 female adult green iguanas.

Procedure—In a crossover design, 5 iguanas received a single dose of ceftiofur sodium (5 mg/kg) IM, and 5 iguanas received the same dose SC. Blood samples were taken at 0, 20, and 40 minutes and 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, and 72 hours after administration. After a 10-week washout period, each iguana was given the same dose via the reciprocal administration route, and blood was collected in the same fashion. Ceftiofur free-acid equivalents were measured via high-performance liquid chromatography.

Results—The first phase intercepts were significantly different between the 2 administration routes. Mean maximum plasma concentration was significantly higher with the IM (28.6 ± 8.0 µg/mL) than the SC (18.6 ± 8.3 µg/mL) administration route. There were no significant differences between terminal halflives (harmonic mean via IM route, 15.7 ± 4.7 hours; harmonic mean via SC route, 19.7 ± 6.7 hours) and mean areas under the curve measured to the last time point (IM route, 11,722 ± 7,907 µg·h/mL; SC route, 12,143 ± 9,633 µg·h/mL). Ceftiofur free-acid equivalent concentrations were maintained ≥ 2 µg/mL for > 24 hours via both routes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A suggested dosing schedule for ceftiofur sodium in green iguanas for microbes susceptible at > 2 µg/mL would be 5 mg/kg, IM or SC, every 24 hours. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1278–1282)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe pharmacokinetics of multidose oral administration of tacrolimus in healthy cats and evaluate the efficacy of tacrolimus in the prevention of allograft rejection in cats with renal transplants.

Animals—6 healthy research cats.

Procedure—Cats received tacrolimus (0.375 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) for 14 days. Blood tacrolimus concentrations were measured by a high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assay. Each cat received an immunogenically mismatched renal allograft and native kidney nephrectomy. Tacrolimus dosage was modified to maintain a target blood concentration of 5 to 10 ng/mL. Cats were euthanatized if plasma creatinine concentration exceeded 7 mg/dL, body weight loss exceeded 20%, or on day 50 after surgery. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted for 6 cats treated with tacrolimus and for 8 cats with renal transplants that did not receive immunosuppressive treatment.

Results—Mean (± SD) values of elimination half-life, time to maximum concentration, maximum blood concentration, and area under the concentration versus time curve from the last dose of tacrolimus to 12 hours later were 20.5 ± 9.8 hours, 0.77 ± 0.37 hours, 27.5 ± 31.8 ng/mL, and 161 ± 168 hours × ng/mL, respectively. Tacrolimus treated cats survived longer (median, 44 days; range, 24 to 52 days) than untreated cats (median, 23 days; range, 8 to 34 days). On histologic evaluation, 3 cats had evidence of acute-active rejection, 1 cat had necrotizing vasculitis, and 2 cats euthanatized at study termination had normal appearing allografts.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tacrolimus may be an effective immunosuppressive agent for renal transplantation in cats. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:926–934)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research