Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: April M. Woods x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Objective

To characterize horses with acute diarrhea and determine risk factors for failure to survive.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

122 adult horses admitted for acute diarrhea at the teaching hospital between Jan 1, 1990 and Dec 31, 1996.

Procedure

Medical records of horses with acute diarrhea were reviewed to abstract information regarding signalment, history, physical examination, clinicopathologic testing, treatment, and outcome.

Results

91 of 122 (74.6%) horses lived and were discharged from the hospital. Horses with history of administration of antimicrobials for a problem preceding diarrhea were approximately 4.5 times less likely to survive. The following variables that had been determined at the time of admission were significantly associated with failure to survive: administration of antimicrobial drugs for another illness, serum creatinine concentration > 2.0 mg/dl, PCV > 45%, tachycardia (heart rate > 60 beats/min), and low serum total protein concentration. Prevalence of laminitis was 11.5%.

Clinical Implications

Diarrheic horses that are azotemic and have clinicopathologic findings consistent with hemoconcentration and hypoproteinemia have a poor prognosis for survival. Antimicrobial administration may induce diarrhea, and antimicrobial-associated diarrhea may have a worse prognosis than other types of acute diarrhea. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:382–390)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine whether dietary and other management factors were associated with development of colic in horses.

Design

Prospective matched case-control study.

Population

2,060 horses examined by veterinarians in private practice in Texas for colic and noncolic emergencies.

Procedure

Each month for 12 months, participating veterinarians were sent forms to collect information on 1 horse with colic and 1 horse that received emergency treatment for a condition other than colic. Information collected included signalment, farm management and characteristics, diet, medical and preventive medical factors, transport, and activity or use. Case and control horses were compared by means of conditional logistic regression to identify factors associated with colic.

Results

Recent change in diet, recent change in type of hay, history of previous episode of colic, history of abdominal surgery for colic, recent change in weather conditions, recent change in housing, Arabian breed, administration of an anthelmintic during the 7-day period prior to examination, failure to receive regular deworming, age > 10 years, and regular exercise (vs pastured at all times) were associated with increased risk of colic.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Results suggest that changes in diet (particularly in type of hay fed) contribute to increased risk of colic. A regular program for administration of anthelmintics may reduce the overall frequency at which colic develops, but recent administration of anthelmintics may predispose some horses to colic. Arabian horses may have an increased risk of colic, and horses at pasture may have a decreased risk of colic. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:53-60)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine the frequency and anatomic location of musculoskeletal injuries incurred by Quarter Horses during races and to compare data from injured horses and matched control horses.

Design

Matched case-control study.

Animals

97 Quarter Horses that sustained a musculoskeletal injury during races and 291 horses from the same races that were not injured.

Procedure

Data examined included racing history, race-entrant characteristics, racing events determined by analysis of videotapes of races, and, when performed, results of prerace physical inspections. Data for injured horses were compared with data for control horses, using conditional logistic regression.

Results

Incidence of a catastrophic injury among Quarter Horses during races was approximately 0.8/1,000 race starts, whereas incidence of musculoskeletal injury during racing was approximately 2.2/1,000 race starts. Odds of musculoskeletal injury were approximately 8 times greater among horses assessed to be at increased risk of injury on the basis of results of prerace physical inspection than for horses not considered to be at increased risk of injury. Evidence was lacking that 2-year-old horses were at increased risk of injury or that sex influenced the risk of injury among Quarter Horses during races.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Incidence of racing injury among Quarter Horses appears to be lower than that observed among Thoroughbreds. Regulatory veterinarians can identify horses at increased risk of injury on the basis of prerace physical inspection, indicating that these inspections could be used to reduce the risk of injury during races. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:662–669)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association