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Abstract

Case Description—A 5-year-old Labrador Retriever was evaluated because of a 3-day history of lethargy, anorexia, vomiting, stranguria, and anuria after routine ovariohysterectomy.

Clinical Findings—On initial examination, signs of abdominal pain and enlargement of the urinary bladder were detected. Clinicopathologic abnormalities included leukocytosis, azotemia, and hyperkalemia. Radiography and surgical exploration of the abdomen revealed urinary bladder torsion at the level of the trigone; histologically, there was necrosis of 90% of the organ.

Treatment and Outcome—After excision of the necrotic wall of the urinary bladder (approx 0.5 cm cranial to the ureteral orifices), the remaining bladder stump was closed with a colonic seromuscular patch. Eleven weeks later, cystoscopy revealed an intramural ureteral stricture, for which treatment included a mucosal apposition neoureterocystostomy. Thirteen months after the first surgery, the dog developed pyelonephritis, which was successfully treated. By 3 months after subtotal cystectomy, the dog's urinary bladder was almost normal in size. Frequency of urination decreased from 3 to 4 urinations/h immediately after surgery to once every 3 hours after 2 months; approximately 4 months after the subtotal cystectomy, urination frequency was considered close to normal.

Clinical Relevance—Urinary bladder torsion is a surgical emergency in dogs. Ischemia of the urinary bladder wall may result from strangulation of the arterial and venous blood supply and from overdistension. Subtotal resection of the urinary bladder, preserving only the trigone area and the ureteral openings, and colonic seromuscular augmentation can be used to successfully treat urinary bladder torsion in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

4 dogs, 7.5 to 10 years of age, were presented for evaluation of signs of chronic cervical pain and forelimb lameness secondary to cervical foraminal intervertebral disk protrusion (IVDP). All dogs were refractory to ≥ 2 weeks of conservative management including strict rest and pain management with anti-inflammatory drugs, methocarbamol, and gabapentin.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The MRI findings included left foraminal IVDP at C2-3 causing mild C3 nerve root compression (dog 1), multifocal degenerative disk disease with mild focal left-sided disk protrusion at C6-7 without associated spinal cord or nerve root compression (dog 2), left foraminal C6-7 IVDP with suspected focal spinal cord atrophy or mild compression (dog 3), and right foraminal C6-7 IVDP and multifocal cervical intervertebral disk degeneration with annulus fibrosus protrusion (dog 4).

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Ultrasound-guided paravertebral perineural injections with methylprednisolone acetate (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb]) at the C3 nerve root in dog 1 and at the C7 nerve root in the other 3 dogs were performed. Injections were repeated at intervals of 4 weeks to 3 months on the basis of clinical response. None of the dogs had any complications from the procedures. For dogs 1 and 4, there was complete resolution of lameness and signs of cervical pain following perineural injections, and for dog 3, there was complete resolution of lameness and only minimal residual cervical pain. Dog 2 did not have long-lasting improvement.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings indicated that ultrasound-guided paravertebral perineural injection can be an effective treatment of cervical foraminal IVDP for some dogs. Additional studies to determine appropriate case selection and better assess the overall success rate and risks associated with this technique are warranted.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate fracture healing after minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) or open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of coexisting radius and ulna fractures in dogs via ultrasonography and radiography.

Design—Prospective cohort study.

Animals—16 dogs with radius-ulna fractures that underwent MIPO (n = 9; 2 dogs were subsequently not included in the analyses because of incomplete follow-up information) or ORIF (7).

Procedures—Dogs in the 2 treatment groups were matched by age, body weight, and configuration of the fractures. Fracture healing was evaluated with ultrasonography, power Doppler ultrasonography, and radiography every 3 to 4 weeks until healing was complete; a semiquantitative score based on the number of Doppler signals was used to characterize neovascularization, and subjective B-mode ultrasonographic and radiographic scores were assigned to classify healing.

Results—Fractures in dogs that underwent MIPO healed in significantly less time than did fractures in dogs that underwent ORIF (mean ± SD; 30 ± 10.5 days and 64 ± 10.1 days, respectively). Radiography revealed that fractures in dogs that underwent MIPO healed with significantly more callus formation than did fractures in dogs that underwent ORIF. Although Doppler ultrasonography revealed abundant vascularization in fractures that were healing following MIPO, no significant difference in neovascularization scores was found between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—For dogs with radius-ulna fractures, data indicated that bridging osteosynthesis combined with a minimally invasive approach contributed to rapid healing after MIPO. The MIPO technique may offer some clinical advantage over ORIF, given that complete radius-ulna fracture healing was achieved in a shorter time with MIPO.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate intradiskal pressure (IDP) in the C6-7 intervertebral disk (IVD) after destabilization and distraction-fusion of the C5-C6 vertebrae.

SAMPLE

7 cadaveric C4-T1 vertebral specimens with no evidence of IVD disease from large-breed dogs.

PROCEDURES

Specimens were mounted in a custom-made 6 degrees of freedom spinal loading simulator so the C5-C6 and C6-C7 segments remained mobile. One specimen remained untreated and was used to assess the repeatability of the IDP measurement protocol. Six specimens underwent 3 sequential configurations (untreated, partial diskectomy of the C5-6 IVD, and distraction-fusion of the C5-C6 vertebrae). Each construct was biomechanically tested under neutral, flexion, extension, and right-lateral bending loads. The IDP was measured with a pressure transducer inserted into the C6-7 IVD and compared between the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus and across all 3 constructs and 4 loads.

RESULTS

Compared with untreated constructs, partial diskectomy and distraction-fusion of C5-C6 decreased the mean ± SD IDP in the C6-7 IVD by 1.3 ± 1.3% and 0.8 ± 1.3%, respectively. During motion, the IDP remained fairly constant in the annulus fibrosus and increased by 3.8 ± 3.0% in the nucleus pulposus. The increase in IDP within the nucleus pulposus was numerically greatest during flexion but did not differ significantly among loading conditions.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Distraction-fusion of C5-C6 did not significantly alter the IDP of healthy C6-7 IVDs. Effects of vertebral distraction-fusion on the IDP of adjacent IVDs with degenerative changes, such as those in dogs with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy, warrant investigation.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare in vitro axial compression, abaxial compression, and torsional stiffnesses of intact and plated radii from small- and large-breed dogs.

Sample—Radii from 18 small-breed and 9 large-breed skeletally mature dogs.

Procedures—3 groups were tested: large-breed dog radii plated with 3.5-mm limited-contact dynamic compression plates (LCDCPs), small-breed dog radii plated with 2.0-mm dynamic compression plates (DCPs), and small-breed dog radii plated with 2.0/2.7-mm cut-to-length plates (CTLPs). The axial compression, abaxial compression, and torsional stiffnesses of each intact radius were determined under loading with a material testing machine. An osteotomy was performed, radii were plated, and testing was repeated. The stiffness values of the plated radii were expressed as absolute and normalized values; the latter was calculated as a percentage of the stiffness of the intact bone. Absolute and normalized stiffness values were compared among groups.

Results—The absolute stiffnesses of plated radii in axial and abaxial compression were 52% to 83% of the intact stiffnesses in all fixation groups. No difference was found in torsion. There was no difference in normalized stiffnesses between small-breed radii stabilized with CTLPs and large-breed radii stabilized with LCDCPs; however, small-breed radii stabilized with DCPs were less stiff than were any other group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Plated radii of small-breed dogs had normalized stiffnesses equal to or less than plated radii of large-breed dogs. The complications typically associated with plating of radial fractures in small-breed dogs cannot be ascribed to an overly stiff bone-plate construct.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To provide an objective, quantitative morphometric description of the caudal cervical intervertebral disk (IVD) spaces of dogs.

SAMPLE Vertebral specimens consisting of C4 through C7 from 5 medium-sized dogs.

PROCEDURES CT images were obtained with the specimens positioned in neutral, flexion, extension, and lateral bending positions. Size and shape of the cranial and caudal end plates, angle between the end plates (IVD wedge angle), and craniocaudal distance (IVD width) between end plates for the 4 loading positions were measured and compared for the 3 segments (C4-5, C5-6, and C6-7).

RESULTS End plate size and shape, IVD wedge angle, and IVD width were not significantly different among the 3 segments. Caudal cervical end plates were consistently larger than cranial cervical end plates. The IVD wedge angle ranged from −4.8° to 15.2°. Flexion induced a reduction in IVD width in the ventral portion of the IVD, whereas extension induced a decrease in width in the dorsal portion of the IVD. Central IVD width remained unchanged among the loading positions.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Unique morphometric and dynamic characteristics of the caudal cervical IVD space of dogs were detected. These findings may help investigators when designing IVD prostheses for dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To validate use of stress MRI for evaluation of stifle joints of dogs with an intact or deficient cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL).

Sample—10 cadaveric stifle joints from 10 dogs.

Procedures—A custom-made limb-holding device and a pulley system linked to a paw plate were used to apply axial compression across the stifle joint and induce cranial tibial translation with the joint in various degrees of flexion. By use of sagittal proton density–weighted MRI, CrCL-intact and deficient stifle joints were evaluated under conditions of loading stress simulating the tibial compression test or the cranial drawer test. Medial and lateral femorotibial subluxation following CrCL transection measured under a simulated tibial compression test and a cranial drawer test were compared.

Results—By use of tibial compression test MRI, the mean ± SD cranial tibial translations in the medial and lateral compartments were 9.6 ± 3.7 mm and 10 ± 4.1 mm, respectively. By use of cranial drawer test MRI, the mean ± SD cranial tibial translations in the medial and lateral compartments were 8.3 ± 3.3 mm and 9.5 ± 3.5 mm, respectively. No significant difference in femorotibial subluxation was found between stress MRI techniques. Femorotibial subluxation elicited by use of the cranial drawer test was greater in the lateral than in the medial compartment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Both stress techniques induced stifle joint subluxation following CrCL transection that was measurable by use of MRI, suggesting that both methods may be further evaluated for clinical use.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare the axial stiffness, maximum axial displacement, and ring deformation during axial loading of single complete and incomplete circular (ring) external skeletal fixator constructs.

Sample—32 groups of single ring constructs (5 constructs/group).

Procedures—Single ring constructs assembled with 2 divergent 1.6-mm-diameter Kirschner wires were used to stabilize a 60-mm-long segment of 16-mm-diameter acetyl resin rod. Construct variables included ring type (complete or incomplete), ring diameter (50, 66, 84, or 118 mm), and fixation wire tension (0, 30, 60, or 90 kg). Axial loading was performed with a materials testing system. Construct secant stiffness and maximum displacement were calculated from the load-displacement curves generated for each construct. Ring deformation was calculated by comparing ring diameter during and after construct loading to ring diameter prior to testing.

Results—Complete ring constructs had greater axial stiffness than did the 66-, 84-, and 118-mm-diameter incomplete ring constructs. As fixation wire tension increased, construct stiffness increased in the 66-, 84-, and 118-mm-diameter incomplete ring constructs. Maximum axial displacement decreased with increasing fixation wire tension, and complete ring constructs allowed less displacement than did incomplete ring constructs. Incomplete rings were deformed by wire tensioning and construct loading.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Mechanical performance of the 66-, 84-, and 118-mm-diameter incomplete ring constructs improved when wire tension was applied, but these constructs were not as stiff as and allowed greater displacement than did complete ring constructs of comparable diameter. For clinical practice, tensioning the wires placed on 84- and 118-mm-diameter incomplete rings to 60 kg is recommended.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine mechanical properties of various prosthetic materials secured to cadaveric canine femurs via various methods and to compare results with those for isolated loops of prosthetic material.

Sample—80 femurs obtained from cadavers of skeletally mature large-breed dogs.

Procedures—10 femoral constructs in each of 8 groups (single circumfabellar loop of polyethylene cord, double loop of polyethylene tape secured via a bone anchor [BAPT], single or double circumfabellar loops of nylon leader material [CNL] or polyethylene tape [CPT], or single or double loops of polyethylene tape secured via a toggle placed through a bone tunnel [BTPT]) and 10 isolated loops of prosthetic material in each corresponding configuration were tested. Stress relaxation, creep, elongation, load at 3 mm of displacement, stiffness, and peak load at failure were determined.

Results—5 single CNL constructs failed before completion of testing. Double CNL and single circumfabellar polyethylene cord constructs had the lowest loads at 3 mm of displacement. Single and double CPT constructs had the highest stiffness. Double BTPT and CPT constructs had the highest peak loads at failure. Double BTPT, double CPT, and BAPT constructs were mechanically superior on the basis of lower creep and stress relaxation and higher stiffness and load at 3 mm of displacement versus other constructs. Stiffness of femoral constructs was 28% to 69% that of corresponding isolated prosthetic loops.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Double BTPT, double CPT, and BAPT constructs were mechanically superior to other constucts. Mechanical properties and methods of anchorage and securing of free ends of prostheses contributed to mechanical properties of constructs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research