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  • Author or Editor: Antoinette E. Marsh x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of prior feeding on pharmacokinetics and estimated bioavailability of orally administered microencapsulated erythromycin base (MEB) in healthy foals.

Animals—6 healthy foals, 3 to 5 months old.

Procedure—Foals were given 2 doses of MEB (25 mg/kg of body weight, PO). One dose was administered after food was withheld overnight, and the other was administered after foals had consumed hay. The study used a crossover design with a 2-week period between doses. Blood was collected via a jugular vein prior to and at specific times after drug administration. Concentrations of erythromycin A and anhydroerythromycin A in plasma were determined, using highperformance liquid chromatography. Results pharmacokinetic analysis of plasma concentration-time data for food-withheld and fed conditions were compared.

Results—Plasma concentrations of erythromycin A for foals were lower after feeding than concentrations when food was withheld. Area under the plasma concentration- time curve, maximum plasma concentration, and estimated bioavailability were greater in foals when food was withheld than when foals were fed. Anhydroerythromycin A was detected in plasma after administration of MEB in all foals.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Foals should be given MEB before they are fed hay. Administration of MEB to foals from which food was withheld overnight apparently provides plasma concentrations of erythromycin A that exceed the minimum inhibitory concentration of Rhodococcus equi for approximately 5 hours. The dosage of 25 mg/kg every 8 hours, PO, appears appropriate. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1011–1015)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of erythromycin and related compounds after intragastric administration of erythromycin phosphate and erythromycin estolate to healthy foals.

Animals—11 healthy 2- to 6-month-old foals.

Procedure—Food was withheld from foals overnight before intragastric administration of erythromycin estolate (25 mg/kg of body weight; n = 8) and erythromycin phosphate (25 mg/kg; 7). Four foals received both drugs with 2 weeks between treatments. Plasma erythromycin concentrations were determined at various times after drug administration by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. Maximum plasma peak concentrations, time to maximum concentrations, area under plasma concentration versus time curves, half-life of elimination, and mean residence times were determined from concentration versus time curves.

Results—Maximum peak concentration of erythromycin A after administration of erythromycin phosphate was significantly greater than after administration of erythromycin estolate (2.9 ± 1.1 µg/ml vs 1.0 ± 0.82 µg/ml). Time to maximum concentration was shorter after administration of erythromycin phosphate than after erythromycin estolate (0.71 ± 0.29 hours vs 1.7 ± 1.2 hours). Concentrations of anhydroerythromycin A were significantly less 1 and 3 hours after administration of erythromycin estolate than after administration of erythromycin phosphate.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Plasma concentrations of erythromycin A remained > 0.25 µg/ml (reported minimum inhibitory concentration for Rhodococcus equi) for at least 4 hours after intragastric administration of erythromycin phosphate or erythromycin estolate, suggesting that the recommended dosage for either formulation (25 mg/kg, q 6 h) should be adequate for treatment of R equi infections in foals. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:914–919)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize gelatinases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and gelatinases produced by alveolar macrophages of healthy calves.

Sample Population—Samples of BALF and alveolar macrophages obtained from 20 healthy 2-month-old calves.

Procedure—BALF was examined by use of gelatin zymography and immunoblotting to detect gelatinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and -2. Cultured alveolar macrophages were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and conditioned medium was subjected to zymography. Alveolar macrophage RNA was used for reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction assay of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase.

Results—Gelatinolytic activity in BALF was evident at 92 kd (14/20 calves; latent MMP-9) and 72 kd (18/20; latent MMP-2). Gelatinolytic activity was evident at 82 kd (10/20 calves; active MMP-9) and 62 kd (17/20; active MMP-2). Gelatinases were inhibited by metal chelators but not serine protease inhibitors. Immunoblotting of BALF protein and conditioned medium confirmed the MMP-2 and -9 proteins. Endogenous inhibitors (ie, TIMPs) were detected in BALF from all calves (TIMP-1) or BALF from only 4 calves (TIMP-2). Cultured alveolar macrophages expressed detectable amounts of MMP-9 mRNA but not MMP-2 mRNA.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Healthy calves have detectable amounts of the gelatinases MMP-2 and -9 in BALF. Endogenous inhibitors of MMPs were detected in BALF (ie, TIMP-1, all calves; TIMP-2, 4 calves). Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated alveolar macrophages express MMP-9 but not MMP-2 mRNA. The role of proteases in the pathogenesis of lung injury associated with pneumonia has yet to be determined. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:163–172)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of lactoferrin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proliferation of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), gene expression of inflammatory mediators, and production of prostanoids in vitro.

Sample Population—PBMCs isolated from 15 Holstein bull calves.

Procedures—Mixed populations of PBMCs were isolated by differential centrifugation. Proliferation assays were conducted in 96-well plates designed to allow addition of lactoferrin (200 ng/mL) with and without LPS (1 μg/mL) in a checkerboard design. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine was used to determine proliferation of PBMCs. Prostaglandin E2 production was determined in culture-conditioned medium by use of enzyme immunoassay. Effects of lactoferrin on LPS-induced gene expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 were monitored by use of PCR assays.

Results—Lactoferrin supplementation significantly reduced LPS-induced incorporation of 3H-thymidine and production of prostaglandin E2 by PBMCs. Lactoferrin reduced LPS-induced expression of COX-2 and MMP-9 mRNA.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Lactoferrin reduced LPS-induced cellular proliferation, inflammatory mediator gene expression, and prostaglandin E2 production by bovine PBMCs in vitro. These effects may be beneficial in reducing the impact of endotoxemia in neonates.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of pasteurization of colostrum on serum lactoferrin concentration and neutrophil oxidative function by comparing values from calves given pasteurized (76 C, 15 minutes) colostrum versus calves given fresh frozen colostrum.

Animals—8 Holstein bull calves were used to study the effects of pasteurization of colostrum on the absorption of lactoferrin and neutrophil oxidative burst. Three additional calves were used to study the effect of exogenous lactoferrin on neutrophil oxidative burst.

Methods—Calves were fed fresh frozen or heat pasteurized colostrum (76 C for 15 minutes) via esophageal feeder within 4 hours of birth. Neutrophils were isolated from whole blood samples. Neutrophil oxidative burst was induced by phorbol ester (300 ng/ml) stimulation of cells (1 × 106 cells) at 37 C. Serum lactoferrin concentrations were compared, using immunoblot analysis. Serum IgG concentrations were determined by radial immunoassay. Comparisons were made between the use of the 2 types of colostrum in calves by measuring subsequent serum IgG and lactoferrin concentrations and neutrophil superoxide production.

Results—Serum IgG and lactoferrin concentrations increased more in calves receiving fresh frozen colostrum. Neutrophil superoxide production was higher in neutrophils prepared from calves receiving fresh frozen colostrum. Colostral lactoferrin addition to neutrophil incubations resulted in increased oxidative burst.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Compared with calves given fresh frozen colostrum, calves given pasteurized colostrum had decreased serum IgG and lactoferrin concentrations and neutrophil superoxide production 24 hours after administration. These results suggest that pasteurizing bovine colostrum at 76 C for 15 minutes has substantial effects on passive transfer of proteins and neutrophil function. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1019–1025)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize and purify covalent complexes of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and haptoglobin released by bovine granulocytes in vitro.

Sample Population—Blood samples obtained from healthy cows and cows with acute and chronic inflammation to obtain WBCs and sera.

Procedures—WBCs were isolated by differential centrifugation, hypotonic lysis of RBCs, and degranulated by stimulation with phorbol ester (20 ng/mL). Cell-conditioned medium was subjected to affinity and gel chromatography and purified proteins subjected to SDS- PAGE gelatin zymography, western blot analysis, Coomassie blue staining, and peptide mass spectrometry for protein identification. Sera of cows hospitalized for acute and chronic septic conditions and of clinically normal cows were analyzed with similar methods.

Results—Matrix metalloproteinase-9 was released from neutrophils in vitro and migrated to a molecular mass of approximately 220 kd (prodimer), approximately 105 kd (promonomer), and > 220 kd (high–molecular mass complexes). These high–molecular mass complexes were composed of α- and β-haptoglobin and MMP-9 (ratio13:13:1). Complexes of MMP-9 and haptoglobin had biochemical properties of both its protein constituents (ie, enzymatic activity toward gelatin and hemoglobin binding). Complexes of MMP-9 and haptoglobin were also detected in sera of cows with acute inflammation, but not in clinically normal cows or cows with chronic disease.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A fraction of neutrophil MMP-9 is released in complex with haptoglobin. The complex is present in granules and retains biological activity of its components. Detection of the complex in serum may provide an indicator of acute inflammation.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the extent of environmental exposure to heteroxenous coccidia from wild canid feces in southeastern Ohio.

SAMPLE 285 presumed wild canid fecal samples collected across an ecological system in southeastern Ohio.

PROCEDURES Morphological classification and molecular analysis were used to determine the canid genus for collected fecal samples. Microscopic and molecular analysis were used to detect coccidian oocysts and DNA. Several variables were analyzed for associations with coccidian DNA detection or prevalence.

RESULTS Coccidian DNA was detected in 51 of 285 (17.9%) fecal samples. Of those positive samples, 1% (95% confidence interval, 0.4% to 3%) had positive results for Hammondia heydorni and none had positive results for Neospora caninum, for an estimated environmental N caninum prevalence of 0% (95% confidence interval, 0% to 7%)/1-km2 hexagonal area evaluated. Morphological classification revealed that 78.9% (225/285) of fecal samples were from coyotes and 17.2% (49/285) were from foxes. No difference in proportions of coccidian DNA-positive fecal samples was identified among canid species. Environmental temperature and fecal freshness were associated with coccidian DNA detection. Land use type, relative canid density, and cattle density were not associated with the prevalence of coccidian DNA-positive samples.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The low prevalence of coccidia shed in wild canid feces in this study, including the estimated 0% environmental prevalence of N caninum, suggested that the role of the oocyst environmental phase in coccidia transmission to ruminants is likely minor in rural southeastern Ohio.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research