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  • Author or Editor: Anne Lanevschi x
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Abstract

Objective

To determine whether alterations in the fibrinolytic pathway analytes, plasminogen (PLG), tissue plasminogen activator, and α2-antiplasmin are significant in dogs subjected to minor and major surgical trauma.

Animals

18 dogs in 3 groups of 6 each.

Procedure

Plasma fibrinolytic pathway analytes were measured in dogs with trauma of ovariohysterectomy (minor trauma) or orthopedic surgery (major trauma) and halothane anesthesia (control group). A commercial procedure adapted to a microtitration plate was used to measure the analytes. Blood was obtained 24 hours before anesthesia, at extubation (0 hours), and again at 2, 24, and 48 hours after extubation. An analyte quality-control strategy was maintained.

Results

In the major trauma group, there was a significant, transient, postsurgical decrease in PLG activity at 0 and 24 hours and a return to presurgical values by 48 hours. The minor trauma group had a similar trend without significant changes, including an increase in PLG values at 48 hours that exceeded the reference range. Antiplasmin values changed significantly in the major trauma group only. Tissue plasminogen activator values remained within the reference range.

Conclusions

Tissue plasminogen activator was not considered a clinical marker of interest for detection of alterations in fibrinolysis after trauma. In contrast, plasma PLG and α2-antiplasmin values may be useful in the evaluation of hemostatic complications of surgery.

Clinical Relevance

Identification of altered fibrinolysis in dogs undergoing traumatic surgery may provide a baseline for preventive pre- and postsurgical hemostatic care. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1137-1140)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the ability of commercial, chromogenic kits designed to measure human fibrinolytic pathway components to measure the canine plasma fibrinolytic pathway enzymes, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen (PLG), and their respective inhibitors, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI) and α2-anti-plasmim (AP).

Animals

20 healthy dogs of various ages and breeds.

Procedure

The commercial procedure was adapted to a microtitration plate. Standard curves were generated by use of a canine plasma pool.

Results

Modifications of the commercial kit consisted of change in incubation periods and the substitution of urokinase for the streptokinase. Plasminogen and AP procedures yielded intra- and interassay coefficients of variation (CV) ranging from 2 to 6.4%. The tPA activity gave an acceptable intra-assay CV of 4.2%, but an equivocal interassay CV of 18%. The PAI assay gave unacceptable intra-assay and interassay CV of 59 and 66%, respectively.

Conclusions

Modifications of the commercial PLG and AP procedures were appropriate for use with fresh and frozen canine plasma. However, equivocal results were obtained for canine plasma tPA. Although the PAI assay was able to detect the inhibitor, it gave unacceptable quantifiable results. Human and canine plasma contained similar amounts of PLG and AP, but 25% more tPA was found in canine plasma than human plasma.

Clinical Relevance

With modifications, the commercial human PLG and AP chromogenic kits may serve to elucidate such canine fibrinolytic disorders as disseminated coagulopathy. The high cost of the chromogenic substrate limits its application. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57: 1124-1130)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research