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  • Author or Editor: Anna-Kaisa Järvinen x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of age and body weight on several neurohumoral variables that are commonly altered in heart failure in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.

Animals—17 healthy privately owned Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, 10 males and 7 females, ranging in age from 0.4 to 9.7 years, and ranging in body weight from 6.6 to 12.2 kg.

Procedure—The clinical condition of the dogs was evaluated by physical examination, thoracic radiography, and echocardiography. Plasma nitrate and nitrite (P-NN), N-terminal atrial natriuretic and brain natriuretic peptides (NT-ANP and BNP, respectively), endothelin (ET-1), urine cyclic guanosine monophosphate (UcGMP), and urine nitrate and nitrite (U-NN) concentrations were analyzed.

Results—Plasma concentrations of NT-ANP and P-NN increased significantly with age, but plasma NT-ANP and P-NN also correlated significantly, irrespective of age. A modest increase of left atrial size did not explain the increase of NT-ANP and P-NN with age. Concentration of ET-1 correlated positively with heart rate; heart rate did not change with age. Weight had a negative impact on NT-ANP, P-NN, and U-cGMP concentrations and left atrial relative size.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Age-matched controls are essential for evaluation of NT-ANP and PNN concentrations and left atrial size. Weight may alter reference values of plasma NT-ANP, P-NN, and urine cGMP concentrations. Natriuretic peptides can be used as further evidence that heart failure exists. The increased plasma concentrations of NT-ANP (but not BNP) and P-NN with aging reflect neurohumoral physiologic changes that must be distinguished from pathologic changes in patients with heart failure. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1818–1824)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine reference values for cytologic examination results of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and to investigate effects of repeated lavages on pulmonary health and on results of cytologic examination of BALF in dogs.

Animals—16 healthy adult Beagles.

Procedure—All dogs underwent pulmonary lavage to obtain BALF. Eleven dogs were repeatedly lavaged 6 times at 5– to 7–week intervals. Analyses for total and differential cell counts and for viability of cells before and after cell processing were performed. Arterial blood gas analysis before and after bronchoalveolar lavage was used to study the safety of the lavage procedure. Histologic and radiologic examinations were used to study effects of repeated lavages on pulmonary health.

Results—Mean (± SD) cell count was 104 ± 69 cells/µl, comprising 75 ± 7% alveolar macrophages, 13 ± 6% lymphocytes, 5 ± 4% neutrophils, 4 ± 5% eosinophils, 2 ± 2% mast cells, 0.6 ± 0.7% epithelial cells, and 0.3 ± 0.4% plasma cells. Centrifugation of samples and washing of cells caused significant cell loss (59 ± 13%). Repeated lavages did not cause significant variations in cell counts of BALF or results of arterial blood gas analysis, thoracic radiography, or histologic examination of pulmonary specimens. Only a moderate, although significant, decrease in arterial oxygen content was observed after bronchoalveolar lavage.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Analysis indicated that several lavages performed at 5– to 7–week intervals can safely and reliably be used to study the kinetics of pathologic processes in pulmonary tissues or for evaluation of therapeutic efficacy. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:13–16)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare recovery of epithelial lining fluid (ELF) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) by use of weight-adjusted or fixed-amount volumes of lavage fluid in dogs.

Animals—13 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—Dogs were allocated to 2 groups. In 1 group, the right caudal lung lobe was lavaged on the basis of each dog's weight (2 mL/kg, divided into 2 aliquots) and the left caudal lung lobe was lavaged with a fixed amount of fluid (50 mL/dog, divided into 2 aliquots). In the second group, the right and left caudal lung lobes were lavaged by use of the fixed-amount and weight-adjusted techniques, respectively. The BALF was collected by use of bronchoscopy. A recovery percentage ≥ 40% was required. The proportion of ELF was calculated by use of the following equation: (concentration of urea in BALF/concentration of urea in serum) × 100.

Results—Mean ± SD proportion of ELF in BALF was 2.28 ± 0.39% for the weight-adjusted technique and 2.89 ± 0.89% for the fixed-amount technique. The SDs between these 2 techniques differed significantly (calculated by comparing 2 covariance structures [unstructured and compound symmetry] in a repeated-measures mixed ANOVA).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The findings strongly suggested that use of a weight-adjusted bronchoalveolar lavage technique provided a more uniform ELF recovery, compared with that for a fixed-amount bronchoalveolar lavage technique, when urea was used as a marker of dilution. A constant ELF fraction can facilitate more accurate comparisons of cellular and noncellular constituents in BALF among patients of various sizes.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research