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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate anatomic reduction and surgical stabilization of femoral capital physeal fractures in cats.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—13 cats.

Procedure—Medical records of cats with unilateral or bilateral femoral capital physeal fractures evaluated from 1998 to 2002 were reviewed. Age and weight of cats at the time of surgery; breed; sex; concurrent injuries; severity of lameness before and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after surgery; the amount of fracture reduction achieved and number of Kirschner wires (K-wires) used; degree of degenerative joint disease of the hip joint and lysis of the femoral neck and head observed after surgery; whether K-wires were removed after surgery; and complications after surgery were evaluated.

Results—Thirteen cats with 16 capital physeal fractures were identified. There was significant improvement in the severity of clinical lameness in all cats from weeks 1 through 4 after surgery. There was no correlation between the scores of the individuals who evaluated radiographs for fracture reduction and placement of K-wires.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that surgical stabilization and repair of femoral capital physeal fractures facilitate a short recovery period and a good prognosis for return to normal function in cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1478–1482)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate feasibility of single-session bilateral triple pelvic osteotomy with 8-hole iliac bone plates in dogs with bilateral hip dysplasia.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—95 dogs with bilateral hip dysplasia.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed, and information was obtained on signalment; body weight; angles of subluxation and reduction prior to surgery; durations of surgery and hospitalization; postoperative mobility; severity of lameness, radiographic grade of hip dysplasia, Norberg angle, and femoral head coverage before and after surgery; time required for radiographic evidence of iliac healing; change in pelvic diameter; implant integrity; and complications.

Results—Mean age at the time of surgery was 10.8 months, and mean weight was 35.2 kg (77.4 lb). Prior to surgery, mean angles of subluxation were 2.2° on the right and 2.6° on the left; mean angles of reduction were 25.9° on the right and 27.3° on the left. Mean surgical time was 95 minutes. All but 1 dog were able to walk on their own by the fourth day after surgery. Mean hospitalization time was 7.5 days. Clinical signs of lameness and radiographic grade of hip dysplasia were significantly improved during follow-up examinations. Mean time for radiographic iliac healing was 8 weeks. None of the plates and only 7 of the 1,520 (0.5%) screws loosened after surgery. Nineteen dogs had complications, but all complications were minor.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that single-session bilateral triple pelvic osteotomy with 8-hole iliac bone plates is effective for treatment of dogs with bilateral hip dysplasia. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:54–59)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features correlated with histologic diagnosis in dogs with nasal disease.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—78 dogs undergoing MRI for evaluation of nasal disease.

Procedures—Medical records and MRI reports of dogs were reviewed to identify MRI features associated with histologic diagnosis. Features evaluated were presence of a mass effect, frontal sinus involvement, sphenoid sinus involvement, maxillary recess involvement, nasopharyngeal infiltration by soft tissue, nasal turbinate destruction, vomer bone lysis, paranasal bone destruction, cribriform plate erosion, and lesion extent (ie, unilateral vs bilateral).

Results—33 dogs had neoplastic disease, 38 had inflammatory rhinitis, and 7 had fungal rhinitis. Lesion extent was not significantly associated with histologic diagnosis. Absence of a mass effect was significantly associated with inflammatory disease. However, presence of a mass was not specific for neoplasia. In dogs with evidence of a mass on magnetic resonance (MR) images, nasal turbinate destruction, frontal sinus invasion, and maxillary recess invasion were not useful in distinguishing neoplastic from nonneoplastic disease, but cribriform plate erosion, vomer bone lysis, paranasal bone destruction, sphenoid sinus invasion, and nasopharyngeal invasion were.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that in dogs with nasal disease, the lack of a mass effect on MR images was significantly associated with inflammatory disease. In dogs with a mass effect on MR images, vomer bone lysis, cribriform plate erosion, paranasal bone destruction, sphenoid sinus invasion by a mass, and nasopharyngeal invasion by a mass were significantly associated with a diagnosis of neoplasia.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine in dogs what effect using hip conformation scores assigned by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) as a criterion for breeding selections would have on hip conformation scores of the progeny.

Design—Longitudinal study.

Animals—English Setters, Portuguese Water Dogs, Chinese Shar-peis, and Bernese Mountain Dogs for which OFA hip conformation scores were known.

Procedure—Pedigree data were obtained from the national breed clubs and the American Kennel Club and merged with data from the OFA hip conformation score database. An ANOVA was used to evaluate the effects of sex, age at the time of radiographic evaluation, and year of birth on the variation in hip conformation scores among the progeny. Heritability was estimated by use of within-year midparent offspring regression analyses.

Results—Significant differences in progeny hip conformation scores between sexes were not detected, but age at the time of radiographic evaluation and year of birth had a significant effect on hip joint conformation of the progeny. Estimated heritability (mean ± SE) was 0.26 ± 0.03, and dam and sire hip conformation scores had a significant effect on progeny hip conformation scores. Annual decreases in percentage of dysplastic progeny and increases in percentages of progeny and breeding dogs with phenotypically normal hip joint conformation were detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that hip conformation scores have moderate heritability in dogs and selection of breeding stock with better hip conformation scores will increase the percentage of progeny with phenotypically normal hip joint conformation. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000; 217:675–680)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association