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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate and compare the anesthetic, analgesic, and cardiorespiratory effects of tiletamine-zolazepam-detomidine-butorphanol (TZDB), tiletamine-zolazepam-xylazine-butorphanol (TZXB), and ketamine-detomidine-butorphanol (KDB) in pigs and to assess anesthetic recovery duration and quality following administration of tolazoline as a reversal agent.

ANIMALS

11 healthy 2.5-month-old castrated male Landrace mixed-breed pigs.

PROCEDURES

In a randomized, blinded crossover study design, pigs received the following anesthetic combinations, IM: TZDB (tiletamine-zolazepam [3 mg/kg {1.36 mg/lb}], detomidine [0.18 mg/kg {0.08 mg/lb}], and butorphanol [0.12 mg/kg {0.05 mg/lb}]); TZXB (tiletamine-zolazepam [4 mg/kg {1.8 mg/lb}], xylazine [4 mg/kg], and butorphanol [0.2 mg/kg {0.09 mg/lb}]); and KDB (ketamine [8 mg/kg {3.63 mg/lb}], detomidine [0.18 mg/kg], and butorphanol [0.3 mg/kg {0.14 mg/lb}]). A 7-day washout period was provided between treatments. At 45 minutes of anesthesia, pigs received tolazoline (2 mg/kg [0.9 mg/lb], IM; n = 6) treatment or control (5) treatment with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution.

RESULTS

All anesthetic combinations induced anesthesia. Endotracheal intubation was completed within 5 minutes after anesthetic administration in all pigs, except in 2 pigs following administration of KDB. Durations (mean ± SD) of endotracheal intubation and lateral recumbency in pigs that did not receive tolazoline were 55.3 ± 4.8 minutes, 83.8 ± 15.8 minutes, and 28.2 ± 4.5 minutes and 112.4 ± 18.7 minutes, 117.2 ± 16.7 minutes, and 79.7 ± 6.0 minutes, respectively, for the TZDB, TZXB, and KDB anesthetic treatments. Tolazoline significantly shortened the duration of anesthetic recovery for all anesthetic treatments without affecting the recovery quality.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

All 3 anesthetic combinations were suitable for providing anesthesia in pigs. Tolazoline administration shortened the duration of anesthetic recovery without affecting the quality of recovery.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare anesthetic, analgesic, and cardiorespiratory effects in dogs after IM administration of dexmedetomidine (7.5 μg/kg)–butorphanol (0.15 mg/kg)–tiletamine-zolazepam (3.0 mg/kg; DBTZ) or dexmedetomidine (15.0 μg/kg)-tramadol (3.0 mg/kg)-ketamine (3.0 mg/kg; DTrK) combinations.

Animals—6 healthy adult mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Each dog received DBTZ and DTrK in a randomized, crossover-design study with a 5-day interval between treatments. Cardiorespiratory variables and duration and quality of sedation-anesthesia (assessed via auditory stimulation and sedation-anesthesia scoring) and analgesia (assessed via algometry and electrical nerve stimulation) were evaluated at predetermined intervals.

Results—DBTZ or DTrK induced general anesthesia sufficient for endotracheal intubation ≤ 7 minutes after injection. Anesthetic quality and time from drug administration to standing recovery (131.5 vs 109.5 minutes after injection of DBTZ and DTrK, respectively) were similar between treatments. Duration of analgesia was significantly longer with DBTZ treatment, compared with DTrK treatment. Analgesic effects were significantly greater with DBTZ treatment than with DTrK treatment at several time points. Transient hypertension (mean arterial blood pressure > 135 mm Hg), bradycardia (heart rate < 60 beats/min), and hypoxemia (oxygen saturation < 90% via pulse oximetry) were detected during both treatments. Tidal volume decreased significantly from baseline with both treatments and was significantly lower after DBTZ administration, compared with DTrK, at several time points.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—DBTZ or DTrK rapidly induced short-term anesthesia and analgesia in healthy dogs. Further research is needed to assess efficacy of these drug combinations for surgical anesthesia. Supplemental 100% oxygen should be provided when DBTZ or DTrK are used.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare the effect of oral administration of tramadol alone and with IV administration of butorphanol or hydromorphone on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in cats.

Design—Crossover study.

Animals—8 healthy 3-year-old cats.

Procedures—Cats were anesthetized with sevoflurane in 100% oxygen. A standard tail clamp method was used to determine the MAC of sevoflurane following administration of tramadol (8.6 to 11.6 mg/kg [3.6 to 5.3 mg/lb], PO, 5 minutes before induction of anesthesia), butorphanol (0.4 mg/kg [0.18 mg/lb], IV, 30 minutes after induction), hydromorphone (0.1 mg/kg [0.04 mg/lb], IV, 30 minutes after induction), saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (0.05 mL/kg [0.023 mL/lb], IV, 30 minutes after induction), or tramadol with butorphanol or with hydromorphone (same doses and routes of administration). Naloxone (0.02 mg/kg [0.009 mg/lb], IV) was used to reverse the effects of treatments, and MACs were redetermined.

Results—Mean ± SEM MACs for sevoflurane after administration of tramadol (1.48 ± 0.20%), butorphanol (1.20 ± 0.16%), hydromorphone (1.76 ± 0.15%), tramadol and butorphanol (1.48 ± 0.20%), and tramadol and hydromorphone (1.85 ± 0.20%) were significantly less than those after administration of saline solution (2.45 ± 0.22%). Naloxone reversed the reductions in MACs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of tramadol, butorphanol, or hydromorphone reduced the MAC of sevoflurane in cats, compared with that in cats treated with saline solution. The reductions detected were likely mediated by effects of the drugs on opioid receptors. An additional reduction in MAC was not detected when tramadol was administered with butorphanol or hydromorphone.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess the isoflurane-sparing effect of a transdermal formulation of fentanyl solution (TFS) and subsequent naloxone administration in dogs.

DESIGN Experiment.

ANIMALS 6 healthy mixed-breed dogs.

PROCEDURES Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane was determined in each dog with a tail clamp method (baseline). Two weeks later, dogs were treated with TFS (2.7 mg/kg [1.23 mg/lb]), and the MAC of isoflurane was determined 4 and 24 hours later. After the 4-hour MAC assessment, saline (0.9% NaCl) solution was immediately administered IV and MAC was reassessed. After the 24-hour MAC assessment, naloxone hydrochloride (0.02 mg/kg [0.01 mg/lb], IV) was immediately administered and MAC was reassessed. Heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure, end-tidal partial pressure of CO2, and oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry were recorded for each MAC assessment.

RESULTS Mean ± SD MAC of isoflurane at 4 and 24 hours after TFS application was 45.4 ± 4.0% and 45.5 ± 4.5% lower than at baseline, respectively. Following naloxone administration, only a minimal reduction in MAC was identified (mean percentage decrease from baseline of 13.1 ± 2.2%, compared with 43.8 ± 5.6% for saline solution). Mean heart rate was significantly higher after naloxone administration (113.2 ± 22.2 beats/min) than after saline solution administration (76.7 ± 20.0 beats/min). No significant differences in other variables were identified among treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The isoflurane-sparing effects of TFS in healthy dogs were consistent and sustained between 4 and 24 hours after application, and these effects should be taken into consideration when anesthetizing or reanesthetizing TFS-treated dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To investigate hemodynamic effects of acepromazine and dexmedetomidine premedication in dogs undergoing general anesthesia induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and assess the influence of these drugs on oxygen-carrying capacity and PCV.

Design—Prospective, randomized crossover study.

Animals—6 healthy adult dogs.

Procedures—Dogs received acepromazine (0.05 mg/kg [0.023 mg/lb]) or dexmedetomidine (15.0 μg/kg [6.82 μg/lb]) IM. Fifteen minutes later, anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained at end-tidal isoflurane concentration of 1.28% (1 minimum alveolar concentration) for 30 minutes. Hemodynamic variables were recorded at predetermined times. The experiment was repeated 48 hours later with the alternate premedication. Results were analyzed by repeated-measures ANOVA with a mixed-models procedure.

Results—Bradycardia, hypertension, and significant cardiac output (CO) reduction developed after dexmedetomidine premedication but improved during isoflurane anesthesia. Hypotension developed after acepromazine administration and persisted throughout the isoflurane maintenance period, but CO was maintained throughout the anesthetic period when dogs received this treatment. Oxygen delivery and consumption were not different between treatments at most time points, whereas arterial oxygen content was lower with acepromazine premedication owing to lower PCV during isoflurane anesthesia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Acepromazine exacerbated hypotension, but CO did not change in dogs anesthetized with propofol and isoflurane. Dexmedetomidine reduced CO but prevented propofol-isoflurane–induced hypotension. In general, oxygen-carrying capacity and PCV were higher in dexmedetomidine-treated than in acepromazine-treated dogs anesthetized with propofol and isoflurane.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the cardiovascular and respiratory effects of water immersion in horses recovering from general anesthesia.

Animals—6 healthy adult horses.

Procedure—Horses were anesthetized 3 times with halothane and recovered from anesthesia while positioned in lateral or sternal recumbency in a padded recovery stall or while immersed in a hydropool. Cardiovascular and pulmonary functions were monitored before and during anesthesia and during recovery until horses were standing. Measurements and calculated variables included carotid and pulmonary arterial blood pressures (ABP and PAP, respectively), cardiac output, heart and respiratory rates, arterial and mixed venous blood gases, minute ventilation, end expiratory transpulmonary pressure (PendXes), maximal change in transpulmonary pressure (ΔPtpmax), total pulmonary resistance (RL), dynamic compliance (Cdyn), and work of breathing ().

Results—Immersion in water during recovery from general anesthesia resulted in values of ABP, PAP, PendXes, ΔPtpmax, RL, and that were significantly greater and values of Cdyn that were significantly less, compared with values obtained during recovery in a padded stall. Mode of recovery had no significant effect on any other measured or calculated variable.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Differences in pulmonary and cardiovascular function between horses during recovery from anesthesia while immersed in water and in a padded recovery stall were attributed to the increased effort needed to overcome the extrathoracic hydrostatic effects of immersion. The combined effect of increased extrathoracic pressure and PAP may contribute to an increased incidence of pulmonary edema in horses during anesthetic recovery in a hydropool. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1903–1910)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate hemodynamic effects in dogs after IM administration of dexmedetomidine (7.5 μg/kg, butorphanol (0.15 mg/kg), and tiletamine-zolazepam (3 mg/kg [DBTZ]) or dexmedetomidine (15 μg/kg), butorphanol (0.3 mg/kg), and ketamine (3 mg/kg [DBK]).

Animals—5 healthy adult mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Each dog received DBTZ and DBK in a randomized crossover study with a 48-hour interval between treatments. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane in 100% oxygen while instrumentation with Swan-Ganz and arterial catheters was performed. Following instrumentation, hemodynamic measurements were recorded at 3.54% (1.5 times the minimum alveolar concentration) sevoflurane; then sevoflurane administration was discontinued, and dogs were allowed to recover. Six hours after cessation of sevoflurane administration, baseline hemodynamic measurements were recorded, each dog was given an IM injection of DBTZ or DBK, and hemodynamic measurements were obtained at predetermined intervals for 70 minutes.

Results—DBTZ and DBK induced hypoventilation (Paco 2, approx 60 to 70 mm Hg), respiratory acidosis (pH, approx 7.2), hypertension (mean arterial blood pressure, approx 115 to 174 mm Hg), increases in systemic vascular resistance, and reflex bradycardia. Cardiac output, oxygen delivery, and oxygen consumption following DBTZ or DBK administration were similar to those following sevoflurane administration to achieve a surgical plane of anesthesia. Blood l-lactate concentrations remained within the reference range at all times for all protocols.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In healthy dogs, both DBTZ and DBK maintained oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption to tissues and blood lactate concentrations within the reference range. However, ventilation should be carefully monitored and assisted when necessary to prevent hypoventilation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine in vitro output temperature differences of 3 IV fluid warmers.

Design—Prospective, randomized study.

Sample—3 IV fluid warmers.

Procedures—Warming capabilities of a distance-dependent blood and fluid warmer marketed for human and veterinary use (product A) and a veterinary-specific distance-dependent fluid warmer (product B) were compared at 0, 4, 8, and 12 cm from the device to the test vein and at flow rates of 20, 60, 100, 140, 180, 220, 260, and 300 mL/h with room temperature (approx 22°C) fluids (phase 1). The superior warming device was compared against a distance-independent IV fluid warmer (product C) with room temperature fluids at the same flow rates (phase 2). The effect of prewarmed fluids (38°C) versus room temperature fluids was evaluated with the superior warming device from phase 2 (phase 3).

Results—In phase 1, product B produced significantly warmer fluids than product A for all flow rates and distances. Both distance-dependent devices produced warmer fluid at 0 cm, compared with 4, 8, and 12 cm. In phase 2, product B produced warmer fluid than product C at 60, 100, 140, and 180 mL/h. In phase 3, there was no significant benefit to use of prewarmed fluids versus room temperature fluids. Output temperatures ≥ 36.4°C were achieved for all rates ≥ 60 mL/h.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Product B had superior warming capabilities. Placing the fluid warmer close to the patient is recommended. Use of prewarmed fluids had no benefit. Lower IV fluid flow rates resulted in lower output fluid temperatures.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the cardiorespiratory effects of IM administration of dexmedetomidine-buprenorphine (DB) and dexmedetomidine-buprenorphine-ketamine (DBK) in dogs with subsequent reversal with atipamezole.

Design—Prospective, randomized crossover study.

Animals—5 healthy dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were instrumented for cardiac output (CO) measurement and received DB (15 μg of dexmedetomidine/kg [6.8 μg/lb] and 40 μg of buprenorphine/kg [18.2 μg/lb]) or DBK (DB plus 3 mg of ketamine/kg [1.36 mg/lb]) in randomized order while breathing room air. Atipamezole (150 μg/kg [68.2 μg/lb], IM) was administered 1 hour later. Hemodynamic data were collected in the conscious dogs and then at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after drug administration. Lactate concentration was measured in mixed venous blood samples. Oxygen delivery (Do 2) and oxygen consumption ( o 2) were calculated.

Results—Heart rate (HR), CO, and Do 2 decreased after DB and DBK administration. The o 2 did not change in the DB group but decreased in the DBK group. The HR was higher in the DBK group than in the DB group throughout the study, but the CO, Do 2, and o 2 values were similar for the 2 groups. Blood lactate concentrations remained low (< 1 mmol/L) throughout the study. Arterial hypoxemia and hypercapnea occurred in both groups. Mean arterial blood pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure were markedly increased in both groups, but to a greater extent in the DBK group. After atipamezole administration, HR, CO, and Do 2 returned to the baseline values.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Adding ketamine to the DB combination allowed dogs to maintain a higher HR and delayed the onset of sinus arrhythmias but failed to provide a significantly higher CO because of a reduction in stroke volume.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the efficacy and cardiorespiratory effects of dexmedetomidine-ketamine in combination with butorphanol, hydromorphone, or buprenorphine with or without reversal by atipamezole in cats undergoing castration.

Design—Prospective, randomized, split-plot, blinded study.

Animals—30 healthy male cats.

Procedures—Cats were assigned to receive dexmedetomidine (25 μg/kg [11.4 μg/lb]) and ketamine (3 mg/kg [1.4 mg/lb]) with butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb]; DKBut; n = 10), hydromorphone (0.05 mg/kg [0.023 mg/lb]; DKH; 10), or buprenorphine (30 μg/kg [13.6 μg/lb]; DKBup; 10). Drugs were administered as a single IM injection. Supplemental isoflurane was administered to cats if the level of anesthesia was inadequate for surgery. At the conclusion of surgery, half the cats (5 cats in each treatment group) received atipamezole (250 μg/kg [113.6 μg/lb], IM) and the remainder received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution IM. All cats received meloxicam (0.2 mg/kg, SC) immediately prior to the conclusion of surgery.

Results—All drug combinations induced lateral recumbency, and intubation was achievable in 13 of 30 (43%) cats at 10 minutes after injection. Supplemental isoflurane was needed for the surgery in 1 of 10 of the DKBut-, 2 of 10 of the DKH-, and 7 of 10 of the DKBup-treated cats. Cats that received atipamezole had a significantly shorter recovery time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—DKBut and DKH combinations were suitable injectable anesthetic protocols for castration in cats commencing at 10 minutes after injection, but cats receiving DKBup may require additional time or anesthetics for adequate anesthesia.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association