Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Angelo Peli x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of passive transfer status, determined by measuring serum IgG concentration 24 hours after parturition, on preweaning growth performance in dairy lambs.

Design—Prospective observational study.

Animals—20 healthy Sardinian dairy lambs.

Procedures—Serum IgG concentration was meaured 24 hours after birth. Body weight was measured at birth and at the time of weaning 28 days (ie, 27 to 29 days) after birth. Mean daily gain from birth to day 28 and day 28 weight were used as measures of preweaning growth performance. Regression analysis was used to evaluate associations between serum IgG concentration 24 hours after birth and measures of preweaning growth performance.

Results—Mean ± SD serum IgG concentration 24 hours after birth was 24.6 ± 17.5 mg/mL. Mean body weights at birth and weaning were 2,696 ± 937 g and 9,253 ± 2,116 g, respectively, and mean daily gain was 234 ± 63 g/d. No significant association was detected between serum IgG concentration 24 hours after birth and birth weight. However, serum IgG concentration 24 hours after birth was significantly associated with mean daily gain (R 2 = 0.25). Each 1 mg/mL increase in serum IgG concentration 24 hours after birth was associated with a 1.8 g/d increase in mean daily gain and a 60.8-g increase in day 28 weight.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that passive transfer status, determined as serum IgG concentration 24 hours after birth, was a significant source of variation in preweaning growth performance in dairy lambs.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare 4 assay procedures for prediction of passive transfer status in lambs.

Animals—Thirty-one 1-day-old Sardinian lambs.

Procedure—Serum IgG concentration was determined by use of single radial immunodiffusion. The following were determined: serum total protein concentration as measured by refractometry (ie, refractometry serum total protein concentration), serum total protein concentration as determined by the biuret method (ie, biuret method serum total protein concentration), serum γ-globulin concentration as determined by serum protein electrophoresis, and serum γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity as measured by spectrophotometry. Accuracy of these assays for estimation of serum IgG concentration in 1-day-old lambs was established by use of linear regression analysis.

Results—Refractometry serum total protein concentration, biuret method serum total protein concentration, and serum γ-globulin concentration were closely and linearly correlated with serum IgG concentration. The natural logarithm (ln) of serum GGT activity was closely and linearly correlated with serum IgG concentration (ln). Refractometry serum total protein concentration, biuret method serum total protein concentration, and γ-globulin concentration accounted for approximately 85%, 91%, and 95% of the variation in serum IgG concentration, respectively. Serum GGT activity (ln) accounted for approximately 92% of the variation in serum IgG concentration (ln).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—For prediction of passive transfer status in 1-day-old lambs, serum GGT activity or biuret method serum total protein concentration determination will allow for passive transfer monitoring program development. Immediate refractometry serum total protein concentration determination is beneficial in making timely management and treatment decisions. Serum γ-globulin concentration determination can be used as a confirmatory test.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate and compare the gene expression of interleukin(IL)-1β, IL-8, and interferon-γ during the first 72 hours after birth in healthy foals and during the first 72 hours after hospitalization in sick neonatal foals and investigate correlations of clinicopathologic variables with cytokine expressions in healthy and sick neonatal foals.

Animals—33 foals < 7 days old (10 healthy foals, 7 foals with sepsis, 6 foals with peripartum asphyxia syndrome, and 12 foals with other diseases [2 with failure of passive transfer of immunity only were not further evaluated]).

Procedures—A blood sample (15 mL) was collected from each foal immediately after birth or hospital admission (0 hours) and at 24 and 72 hours later. Clinicopathologic variables were evaluated, and cytokine gene expression in WBCs was measured with an absolute quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assay.

Results—At all time points, gene expression of interferon-γ was low in all groups. No time-dependent changes in cytokine expressions were detected in healthy or sick foals. Foals with sepsis had significantly higher IL-1β gene expression than did healthy foals, foals with peripartum asphyxia syndrome, or foals with other diseases. At 0 hours, IL-1β expression was correlated with plasma fibrinogen concentration in healthy foals and with the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in foals with sepsis; IL-8 expression was correlated with monocyte count in foals with sepsis and with arterial pH, plasma fibrinogen concentration, and plasma lactate concentration in foals with peripartum asphyxia syndrome.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Data have suggested that evaluation of IL-1β expression in sick neonatal foals could help identify those with sepsis.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the associations between serum IgG concentration and serum activities of γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and pseudocholinesterase for the potential use of these serum enzymes as predictors of passive transfer status in neonatal lambs.

Design—Prospective observational study.

Animals—47 Sardinian lambs from birth to 2 days old.

Procedure—Serum enzyme activities were measured by use of commercially available kits and a clinical biochemical analyzer. Serum IgG concentration was determined by single radial immunodiffusion. Associations between serum IgG concentration and the activity of each serum enzyme were established by use of regression analysis.

Results—A significant correlation was detected between serum IgG concentration and serum GGT activity in 1- and 2-day-old lambs. Minimal correlations were detected between serum IgG concentration and serum alkaline phosphatase activity in 1-dayold lambs and serum pseudocholinesterase activity in 1- and 2-day-old lambs. No significant associations were detected between serum IgG concentration and serum activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase. A multiple linear regression model was accurate for the estimation of the natural logarithm of serum IgG concentration as a function of the natural logarithm of serum GGT activity and of the age of lambs at the time of sampling (adjusted R 2 = 0.89). This model was then used to calculate the serum GGT activity equivalent to various serum IgG concentrations for 1- and 2-day-old lambs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that passive transfer status in neonatal lambs can be successfully predicted by measurement of serum GGT activity but not by measurement of the other enzymes tested. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005; 226:951–955)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of budesonide in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Animals—11 dogs (mean ± SD age, 5.7 ± 3.9 years; various breeds and body weights) with moderate or severe IBD.

Procedures—Each dog received a controlled-release formulation of budesonide (3 mg/m2, PO, q 24 h) for 30 days (first day of administration was day 1). The concentration of budesonide and its metabolite (16-α-hydroxyprednisolone) was measured via liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry in plasma and urine samples obtained on days 1 and 8 of treatment. On those days, plasma samples were obtained before the daily budesonide administration and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 7 hours after drug administration, whereas urine samples were obtained after collection of the last blood sample. A clinical evaluation was performed on the dogs before onset of drug administration and on days 20 and 30 after start of drug administration.

Results—The highest plasma concentration of budesonide and 16-α-hydroxyprednisolone on day 1 was detected at 1 hour and at 2 hours after drug administration, respectively. After standardization on the basis of specific gravity, the ratio between urinary concentrations of budesonide and 16-α-hydroxyprednisolone was 0.006 and 0.012 on days 1 and 8, respectively. The clinical response was adequate in 8 of 11 dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Budesonide was rapidly absorbed and metabolized in dogs with IBD. The drug gradually accumulated, and there was an adequate therapeutic response and no adverse effects.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research