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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate coagulation factors in units of leukoreduced (LR) and nonleukoreduced (non-LR) canine fresh-frozen plasma (cFFP).

ANIMALS

8 healthy research dogs.

PROCEDURES

In a crossover study, dogs were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups from which blood was collected and either did or did not undergo leukoreduction. After a recovery period of ≥ 28 days, the dogs were switched between protocols. After each collection, blood samples were centrifuged, and cFFP was stored frozen for later comparative analysis of coagulation factors, antithrombin, and protein C activities (reported as comparative percentages of the corresponding activities determined in a canine pooled plasma standard); prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times; and fibrinogen concentration.

RESULTS

There were no significant differences detected between results for LR cFFP, compared with those for non-LR cFFP.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Although there was variation among residual activities of coagulation factors in LR and non-LR cFFP, the variations and differences were considered unlikely to impact the efficacy of LR cFFP transfused for coagulation factor replacement in dogs. However, owing to the small sample size and high variability of results in the present study, additional research with a larger sample size is required for definitive conclusions on the effects of leukoreduction on coagulation factors in cFFP and to develop treatment guidelines for LR cFFP use in dogs with congenital and acquired coagulopathies.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 5-year-old 8.6-kg (18.9-lb) spayed female Pug was evaluated because of chronic hematuria and recurrent urinary tract infections.

Clinical Findings—Excretory urography, ultrasonography, and excretory CT urography were performed. Results indicated that the dog had bilateral hydronephrosis and hydroureter and suspected proximal ureteral stenosis. Retrograde ureteropyelography confirmed the presence of stenosis at the ureteropelvic junction of each ureter, along with a large amount of endoluminal ureteral debris. Clinical findings suggested that the dog had a congenital bilateral anomaly of the upper urinary tract.

Treatment and Outcome—The dog was anesthetized, and 2 double-pigtail ureteral stents were placed cystoscopically with fluoroscopic guidance for immediate relief of the ureteropelvic junction obstructions. Each stent extended from the left or right renal pelvis to the urinary bladder. The procedures and the patient's recovery from anesthesia were uncomplicated. Continuing improvements in severity of hydronephrosis, hydroureter, and dysuria were evident during routine follow-up examinations at 2, 4, 12, 16, and 45 weeks after stent placement. Over the subsequent 12 months, all clinical signs remained resolved other than a urinary tract infection that was successfully treated with antimicrobials.

Clinical Relevance—Ureteral stenosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis for hydronephrosis in dogs, particularly when urinary tract calculi or neoplasia is not present. Chronic hematuria and recurrent urinary tract infections can be associated with this condition. Placement of ureteral stents may be a successful treatment option for ameliorization of congenital ureteral obstructions.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate eicosanoid concentrations in freshly prepared canine packed RBCs (PRBCs) and to assess changes in eicosanoid concentrations in PRBC units over time during storage and under transfusion conditions.

DESIGN Prospective study.

SAMPLE 25 plasma samples from 14 healthy Greyhounds.

PROCEDURES Plasma samples were obtained during PRBC preparation (donation samples), and the PRBC units were then stored at 4°C until used for transfusion (≤ 21 days later; n = 17) or mock transfusion if expired (22 to 24 days later; 8). Immediately prior to use, 100 mL of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution was added to each unit and a pretransfusion sample was collected. A posttransfusion sample was collected after transfusion or mock transfusion. Concentrations of arachidonic acid, prostaglandin (PG) F, PGE2, PGD2, thromboxane B2, 6-keto-PGF, and leukotriene B4 were measured by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and analyzed statistically.

RESULTS Median arachidonic acid concentration was significantly decreased in posttransfusion samples, compared with the concentration in donation samples. Median PGF, 6-keto-PGF, and leukotriene B4 concentrations were significantly increased in pretransfusion samples, compared with those in donation samples. Median PGF, thromboxane B2, and 6-keto-PGF concentrations were significantly increased in posttransfusion samples, compared with those in pretransfusion samples. Duration of PRBC storage had significant associations with pretransfusion and posttransfusion arachidonic acid and thromboxane B2 concentrations.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Concentrations of several proinflammatory eicosanoids increased in PRBC units during storage, transfusion, or both. Accumulation of these products could potentially contribute to adverse transfusion reactions, and investigation of the potential association between eicosanoid concentrations in PRBCs and the incidence of transfusion reactions in dogs is warranted.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association