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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Desmotomy of the accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor muscle (inferior check desmotomy) permitted Standardbred foals affected with flexural deformities to reach their full athletic potential. Long-term effects of inferior check desmotomy were examined in 23 Standardbreds over a 10-year period. Six of 11 foals that were treated surgically either raced 6 times and obtained a race record or were training sound (if yearlings). All 12 horses with flexural deformity that did not receive an inferior check desmotomy had an unfavorable outcome (no race record). Foals that had surgery performed at a younger age apparently had a better chance of racing or training sound because no foals treated surgically after 8 months of age had a favorable outcome and only 1 foal that was older than 5 months at the time of surgery had a favorable outcome. In 5 foals that had surgery with an unsuccessful outcome, 3 were ≥1 year old at the time of surgery and were lame when training was started on the limb(s) with the desmotomy.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess kinetic 2-([18F]fluoro)-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18FDG) uptake in the brain of anesthetized healthy adult dogs by use of positron emission tomography (PET) and to determine whether 18FDG uptake differs among anatomic regions of the brain.

Animals—5 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—Each isoflurane-anesthetized dog was administered 18FDG IV (dose range, 3.0 to 5.2 mCi), and PET data were acquired for 2 hours. A CT scan (without contrast agent administration) was performed to allow more precise neuroanatomic localization. Defined regions of interest within the brain were drawn on reconstructed image data. Standard uptake values (SUVs) for 18FDG were calculated to generate time-activity curves and determine time to peak uptake.

Results—Time-activity curve analysis identified 4 regional uptake patterns: olfactory, gray matter, white matter, and other (brainstem, cerebellum, and occipital and frontal regions). The highest maximum SUVs were identified in the olfactory bulbs and cerebral gray matter, and the lowest maximum SUV was identified in cerebral white matter. Mean time to peak uptake ranged from 37.8 minutes in white matter to 82.7 minutes in the olfactory bulbs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Kinetic analysis of 18FDG uptake revealed differences in uptake values among anatomic areas of the brain in dogs. These data provide a baseline for further investigation of 18FDG uptake in dogs with immune-mediated inflammatory brain disease and suggest that 18FDG-PET scanning has potential use for antemortem diagnosis without histologic analysis and for monitoring response to treatment. In clinical cases, a 1-hour period of PET scanning should provide sufficient pertinent data.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To identify changes in folate status of mares and foals during lactation and growth, respectively.

Animals—20 Thoroughbred mares and foals.

Procedures—Pregnant mares, and following foaling the same mares with their foals, were maintained on mixed grass-legume pasture and fed either a traditional dietary supplement rich in sugar and starch (SS) or a dietary supplement high in fat and fiber (FF). Blood samples were collected monthly from mares and foals up to 6 months after foaling. Total folate concentration in feed and forage was determined. Analyses of plasma folate, RBC folate, plasma homocysteine (HCY), and milk folate concentrations were performed.

Results—Mare plasma folate concentrations declined moderately during 6 months of lactation. Mare RBC folate concentrations initially increased after foaling up to 3 months but declined toward the end of the study. Plasma HCY concentration was higher for mares fed the SS supplement, compared with mares fed the FF supplement from foaling to 6 months of lactation. Milk folate concentrations decreased during the first 3 months and then increased. Foal plasma folate initially declined but then increased. Stable concentrations of RBC folate were observed in foals. Plasma HCY concentrations in foals were unaffected by growth during the last 5 months. References range values for plasma folate, RBC folate, milk folate, and plasma HCY concentrations in healthy lactational mares and young growing foals were determined.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Folate status was not impaired in lactating mares and growing foals under the conditions in our study. It appears that folate supplementation is not necessary. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1214–1221)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of zonisamide following rectal administration of 20 or 30 mg/kg suspended in sterile water or polyethylene glycol (PEG) to healthy dogs and determine whether either dose resulted in plasma zonisamide concentrations within the recommended therapeutic target range (10 to 40 μg/mL).

ANIMALS 8 healthy mixed-breed dogs.

PROCEDURES Each dog received each of 2 doses (20 or 30 mg/kg) of zonisamide suspended in each of 2 delivery substrates (sterile water or PEG) in a randomized crossover study with a 7-day washout period between phases. A blood sample was collected from each dog immediately before and at predetermined times for 48 hours after zonisamide administration. Plasma zonisamide concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and data were analyzed with a noncompartmental model.

RESULTS Mean maximum plasma concentration, time to maximum plasma concentration, mean residence time, and elimination half-life did not differ significantly among the 4 treatments. The mean maximum plasma concentration for all 4 treatments was less than the therapeutic target range. The mean ± SD area under the concentration-time curve for the 30 mg/kg-in-water treatment (391.94 ± 237.00 h•μg/mL) was significantly greater than that for the 20 mg/kg-in-water (146.19 ± 66.27 h•μg/mL) and 20 mg/kg-in-PEG (87.09 ± 96.87 h•μg/mL) treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that rectal administration of zonisamide at doses of 20 and 30 mg/kg failed to achieve plasma zonisamide concentrations within the recommended therapeutic target range. Therefore, rectal administration of zonisamide cannot be recommended as a suitable alternative to oral administration.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine incidence of animal bite injuries among humans in North Carolina by use of statewide emergency department visit data; to evaluate incidence rates on the basis of age, sex, urbanicity, biting species, and month for selected species; and to characterize bite-related emergency department visits.

Design—Retrospective cohort and cross-sectional study.

Sample—Records of 38,971 incident animal bite–related emergency department visits in North Carolina from 2008 to 2010.

Procedures—Emergency department visits were selected for inclusion by means of external-cause-of-injury codes assigned with an international coding system and keyword searches of chief complaint and triage notes. Rates were calculated with denominators obtained from census data. Cross-sectional analysis of incident emergency department visits was performed.

Results—By the age of 10, a child in North Carolina had a 1 in 50 risk of dog bite injury requiring an emergency department visit. Incidence rates for dog bites were highest for children ≤ 14 years of age, whereas the incidence rate for cat bites and scratches was highest among individuals > 79 years of age. Lifetime risk of cat bite or scratch injury requiring an emergency department visit was 1 in 60 for the population studied. Rabies postexposure prophylaxis was administered during 1,664 of 38,971 (4.3%) incident visits.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Emergency department visit surveillance data were used to monitor species-specific bite incidence statewide and in various subpopulations. Emergency department surveillance data may be particularly useful to public health veterinarians. Results may inform and renew interest in targeted animal bite prevention efforts.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association