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  • Author or Editor: Amiya K. Patnaik x
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Summary

Nonhematopoietic hepatic neoplasms (n = 25) were diagnosed in 21 cats during a 5.5-year period. Thirteen of the neoplasms were benign bile duct adenomas and 12 were malignant, 6 of which were bile duct adenocarcinomas. All cats were ≥ 10 years old, and 14 were male. Main clinical signs were anorexia and lethargy, and 15 of 21 cats had hepatomegaly. All 21 cats were feline leukemia virustest negative. Although there was a trend toward high activities of serum alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase, neither clinical signs nor enzyme activity were specific for diagnosis of hepatic neoplasia in the cats of this study.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To evaluate a group of cats with malignant colonic neoplasia and to identify factors related to survival time.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

46 cats with malignant colonic neoplasia.

Procedure

Information on signalment, diagnostic findings, histopathologic diagnosis, surgical procedure performed, identification of nodal metastasis at surgery, type of chemotherapy administered, and survival time was obtained from the medical record of each cat. A diagnosis of malignant colonic neoplasia had been established by histologic examination of endoscopic biopsy specimens (3 cats), biopsy specimens obtained during laparotomy (38), or necropsy specimens (5).

Results

Mean age of cats was 12.5 years (range, 6 to 18 years). Ultrasonography was useful 84% of the time in localizing the mass to the intestine. Three cats had endoscopic biopsy, 9 had incisional biopsy, 21 had mass resection, and 8 had subtotal colectomy performed. Histopathologic diagnoses included adenocarcinoma (21 cats), lymphoma (19), mast cell tumor (4), and neuroendocrine carcinoma (2).

Clinical Implications

Obtaining clean margins at surgery seems to increase survival time in cats with malignant colonic neoplasia. Metastasis at the time of surgery decreases survival time. Data from this study indicate that the survival time of certain cats with colonic lymphoma may not be affected by chemotherapy. Cats with an unidentified colonic mass should receive a subtotal colectomy to increase survival time. Cats with colonic adenocarcinoma should receive a subtotal colectomy with consideration of doxorubicin administration to increase survival time. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997; 211:878–881)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

During a 5-year period, leiomyosarcoma was diagnosed in 57 dogs. Forty-four dogs were included in the study on the basis of completeness of medical records. All dogs underwent exploratory laparotomy, and dogs were allotted to 4 groups according to primary site of tumor: spleen (16 dogs, median age 10.3 years), stomach/small intestine (13 dogs, median age 10.3 years), cecum (10 dogs, median age 11.8 years), and liver (5 dogs, median age 9 years). All dogs with leiomyosarcoma of the liver had visible metastasis and were euthanatized at surgery. In the other 3 groups, 79% of the dogs had no gross evidence of metastasis at surgery, and 64% survived > 2 weeks. Median survival in these 3 groups was 10 months (range, 1 month to 7 years); 48% died of metastasis, 32% died of unrelated causes, and 16% died of unknown causes. The prognosis in dogs with leiomyosarcoma of the spleen, stomach, small intestine, and especially the cecum is good to excellent if surgery is performed. In dogs with leiomyosarcoma of the liver, the prognosis is poor.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine outcome of cats with nonlymphoid tumors of the vertebral canal that undergo surgery.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

11 cats.

Procedure

Information obtained from the medical records included signalment, tumor location, gross evaluation of completeness of surgical excision, histologic diagnosis, and survival time.

Results

Median age of cats was 12 years; all cats had negative FeLV and feline immunodeficiency virus test results. All cats underwent a hemilaminectomy or dorsal laminectomy. The tumor was located in the thoracic portion of the vertebral column in 6 cats. Six cats had intradural-extramedullary tumors. Tumors included meningioma (n = 5), malignant nerve sheath tumors (2), and meningeal sarcoma, chondrosarcoma, lipoma, and osteosarcoma (1 each). One cat was lost to follow-up, 1 cat with meningioma was alive 1,400 days after surgery, and 1 cat with a nerve sheath tumor was alive 2,190 days after surgery. Median survival time for the other 4 cats with meningioma was 180 days (range, 30 to 600 days).

Clinical Implications

Cats with nonlymphoid vertebral canal tumors that undergo surgery may have a good prognosis. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210:663–664

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate completeness of excision and clinical outcome in dogs with cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) excised with a lateral margin of 2 cm and a deep margin of 1 fascial plane.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—16 client-owned dogs with 1 or more cutaneous MCTs.

Procedure—Excision of MCTs was performed with a 2-cm lateral margin and a deep margin of 1 fascial plane. Histologic tumor grading was performed; surgical margins were categorized as complete or incomplete. Follow-up information was obtained via repeat examination of the dogs by veterinarians or client-completed questionnaires.

Results—4 grade I and 19 grade II cutaneous MCTs were evaluated. Overall, 21 (91%) MCTs were completely excised; 2 grade II tumors had foci of mast cells at the 2-cm margin. Two dogs received adjunctive treatments following surgery. Follow-up information was available for all dogs (median follow-up period, 379 days; range, 51 to 538 days); no local recurrence was detected during this time. De novo MCTs were detected in 3 of 16 dogs at 37, 54, and 154 days after surgery. Via Kaplan-Meier analysis, median survival time and disease-free interval were both > 538 days (medians not yet reached). No prognostic variables were identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Excision with a 2-cm lateral margin and a deep margin of 1 fascial plane may result in satisfactory excision of grades I and II MCTs in dogs, with recurrence rates similar to those reported previously. Use of these margins may minimize complications associated with larger local tumor resection.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate efficacy of radiation for treatment of incompletely resected soft-tissue sarcomas in dogs.

Design—Prospective serial study.

Animals—48 dogs with soft-tissue sarcomas.

Procedure—Tumors were resected to < 3 cm3 prior to radiation. Tumors were treated on alternate days (three 3-Gy fractions/wk) until 21 fractions had been administered. Cobalt 60 radiation was used for all treatments.

Results—Five-year survival rate was 76%, and survival rate was not different among tumor types or locations. Four (8%) dogs developed metastases. Eight (17%) dogs had tumor recurrence after radiation. Development of metastases and local recurrence were significantly associated with reduced survival rate. Median survival time in dogs that developed metastases was 250 days. Median disease-free interval for all dogs was 1,082 days. Median time to recurrence was 700 days. Dogs that developed recurrence after a prolonged period responded well to a second surgery. Acute radiation toxicosis was minimal; osteosarcoma developed at the radiation site in 1 dog.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—An excellent long-term survival rate may be achieved by treating soft-tissue sarcomas in dogs with resection followed by radiation. Amputation is not necessary for longterm control of soft-tissue sarcomas in limbs. Development of metastases and recurrence of local tumors after radiation treatment are associated with decreased survival rate. Acute and delayed radiation toxicosis was minimal with the protocol used in this study. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:205–210)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether neoplastic mast cells extended into tissue 1, 2, or 3 cm laterally or deeper than 1 fascial plane from the visible edge of cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) in dogs.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—21 client-owned dogs with ≥ 1 cutaneous MCT.

Procedures—After preparation for surgery, each dog's skin was marked 1, 2, and 3 cm from the tumor edge at 0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°. At each 3-cm mark, deep fascia was exposed and sutured to the skin; the tumor was excised in routine fashion and fixed in formalin. Tumors were graded; margins were examined histologically for neoplastic mast cells.

Results—23 cutaneous MCTs in 21 dogs were included in this study. Fifteen (65%) tumors were located on the trunk, 5 (22%) on the hind limbs, and 3 (13%) on the head and neck. There were 3 (13%) grade-I and 20 (87%) grade-II tumors. All grade-I tumors were completely excised at all margins. Seventy-five percent of the grade-II tumors were completely excised at the 1- cm margin, and 100% were completely excised at the 2-cm margin. Two grade-II MCTs located on the hind limbs of dogs were excised with a complete but close (within 1 mm) deep margin.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that a 2-cm lateral margin and a deep margin of 1 fascial plane appear to be adequate for complete excision of grade-I and -II MCTs in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:236–240)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association