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  • Author or Editor: Amanda L. Abelson x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether implementation of a standardized perianesthetic protocol was associated with reduced incidence of postoperative regurgitation, pneumonia, and respiratory distress in brachycephalic dogs undergoing general anesthesia for airway surgery.

ANIMALS

84 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

A perianesthetic protocol that included preoperative administration of metoclopramide and famotidine, restrictive use of opioids, and recovery of patients in the intensive care unit was fully implemented for brachycephalic dogs in July 2014. Medical records of brachycephalic dogs (specifically Boston Terriers, French Bulldogs, English Bulldogs, and Pugs) undergoing anesthesia for airway surgery before (group A) and after (group B) protocol implementation were reviewed. Patient characteristics, administration of medications described in the protocol, surgical procedures performed, anesthesia duration, recovery location, and postoperative development of regurgitation, pneumonia, and respiratory distress were recorded. Data were compared between groups.

RESULTS

The proportion of dogs with postoperative regurgitation in group B (4/44 [9%]) was significantly lower than that in group A (14/40 [35%]). No intergroup differences in patient characteristics (including history of regurgitation), procedures performed, or anesthesia duration were found. Rates of development of postoperative pneumonia and respiratory distress did not differ between groups. A history of regurgitation was associated with development of postoperative regurgitation.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Implementation of the described protocol was associated with decreased incidence of postoperative regurgitation in brachycephalic dogs undergoing anesthesia. Prospective studies are warranted to elucidate specific causes of this finding.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare liposome-encapsulated bupivacaine (LEB) and (nonliposomal) 0.5% bupivacaine hydrochloride (0.5BH) for control of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO).

ANIMALS

33 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

In a randomized clinical trial, dogs undergoing TPLO received LEB (5.3 mg/kg [2.4 mg/lb]) or 0.5BH (1.5 mg/kg [0.68 mg/lb]) by periarticular soft tissue injection. All dogs received carprofen (2.2 mg/kg [1 mg/lb], SC, q 12 h) beginning at extubation. Signs of pain were assessed at extubation and predetermined times up to 48 hours later with the Colorado State University-Canine Acute Pain Scale and Glasgow Composite Pain Scale-Short Form. A pressure nociceptive threshold device was used at the affected stifle joint before surgery and at 5 postoperative time points. Methadone (0.1 mg/kg [0.05 mg/lb], IV) was administered if the Colorado State University pain scale score was ≥ 2 (scale, 0 to 4). Surgical variables; pain scores; pressure nociceptive thresholds; times to first administration of rescue analgesic, first walk, and first meal consumption; and total opioid administration were compared between treatment groups.

RESULTS

28 dogs completed the study. Dogs administered LEB were less likely to require rescue analgesia and received lower amounts of opioids than dogs administered 0.5BH. There were no significant intergroup differences in other measured variables.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The LEB appeared to provide adequate analgesia after TPLO with lower requirements for opioid treatments, which may allow dogs to be discharged from the hospital earlier than with traditional pain management strategies.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to determine whether an infiltrative block with liposomal bupivacaine was associated with less rescue analgesia administration and lower pain scores than a bupivacaine splash block after ovariohysterectomy in dogs.

ANIMALS

Eligible dogs included those that were spayed as part of a veterinary teaching laboratory. Dogs were up to 7 years old and otherwise healthy. A total of 136 dogs were analyzed.

METHODS

All dogs underwent ovariohysterectomy performed by veterinary students. Dogs received hydromorphone and acepromazine premedication, propofol induction, isoflurane maintenance, and an NSAID. Dogs were randomly allocated to receive either a splash block with standard bupivacaine or an infiltrative block with liposomal bupivacaine for incisional analgesia. Postoperatively, all dogs were assessed by a blinded evaluator using the Colorado State University–Canine Acute Pain Scale (CSU-CAPS) and Glasgow Composite Measures Pain Scale–Short Form (GCPS-SF). Dogs received rescue analgesia with buprenorphine if they scored ≥ 2 on the CSU-CAPS scale.

RESULTS

Dogs that received liposomal bupivacaine had a significantly lower incidence of (P = .04) and longer time to (P = .03) administration of rescue analgesia. There was an overall time-averaged significant difference between groups for CSU-CAPS (P = .049) and GCPS-SF scores (P = .015), with dogs in the bupivacaine group being more likely to have an elevated pain score at some point for both scales.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The use of liposomal bupivacaine in an infiltrative block may decrease the need for rescue analgesia in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy compared to a bupivacaine splash block.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association