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  • Author or Editor: Alyssa J. Carrillo x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To retrospectively describe clinical characteristics of canine gastrointestinal foreign bodies (GIFB) that were successfully and unsuccessfully managed conservatively.

ANIMALS

68 client-owned dogs presented to the Texas A&M Small Animal Teaching Hospital between January 1, 2018, and October 1, 2023, for GIFB where medical management was attempted.

CLINICAL PRESENTATION

Medical records were reviewed for signalment, history, physical examination, bloodwork, diagnostic imaging, foreign body type, location, treatments, and outcome. Success was defined as the passage of the foreign body through the colon, while failure was defined as requiring surgery, endoscopy, or euthanasia.

RESULTS

Medical management was successful in 32 cases (47%; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.66). Gastric dilation resolved in all success cases (n = 5 [100%]; 95% CI, 0.32 to 2.3) but did not resolve in any failure cases (13 [0%]). Small intestinal dilation resolved in all success cases (n = 13 [100%]; 95% CI, 0.53 to 1.7) but progressed in most failure cases (9 [75%]; 95% CI, 0.34 to 1.4). In the success group, 31 GIFB were nonlinear (96.9%; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.4), while 1 was linear (3.1%; 95% CI, 0.001 to 0.17). In the failure group, 29 GIFB were nonlinear (80.6%; 95% CI, 0.54 to 1.16), while 7 were linear (19.4%; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.4). Of the cases that elected surgery (n = 29 [42.7%]; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.61), resection and anastomosis was performed in 3 cases (10.3%; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.3). All cases that required resection and anastomosis were nonlinear GIFB.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Conservative management of GIFB provides a feasible treatment option and may be considered based on presentation, foreign body location, hemodynamic stability of the patient, diagnostic imaging, and type of foreign body.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To prospectively evaluate clinical outcomes using acellular fish skin grafts (FSGs) for the management of complete wound healing by secondary intention after wide surgical excision of skin tumors in dogs.

ANIMALS

5 dogs undergoing wide surgical excision of skin tumors on the distal extremity.

CLINICAL PRESENTATION AND PROCEDURES

FSGs were applied to surgical wound beds following wide excision of the tumor. Bandages were changed weekly and additional grafts placed when integration of the previous graft was complete. The wounds were assessed for the following: dimensions, tissue health (color), time to complete epithelialization, complications, and tumor recurrence.

RESULTS

All masses were excised with 2-cm lateral margins and 1 fascial plane deep to the tumor. Tumor diagnoses included 3 mast cell tumors and 2 soft tissue sarcomas. Surgical wounds had a median area of 27.6 cm2 (range, 17.6 to 58.7 cm2). The median number of FSG applications was 5 (range, 4 to 9 applications). Complete epithelialization occurred within 7 to 9 weeks for uncomplicated wounds (3 of 5) and 12 to 15 weeks for complicated wounds (2 of 5) that sustained self-trauma. There were no adverse events related to the use of FSGs. Local recurrence was not seen over a follow-up period ranging from 239 to 856 days.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Wide surgical excision of distal extremity skin tumors, followed by repeated application of acellular FSGs, resulted in complete healing of all wounds with no adverse events. This treatment method does not require advanced reconstructive surgical skills and may be useful for the management of skin tumors on the distal extremities.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association