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  • Author or Editor: Allyson C. Berent x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe the technique and outcome for male dogs undergoing rigid urethrocystoscopy via a novel percutaneous, fluoroscopic-assisted perineal approach.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 19 client-owned male dogs.

PROCEDURES Medical records of male dogs that underwent urethrocystoscopy via a percutaneous perineal approach for treatment of a variety of conditions from 2005 through 2014 were reviewed. Signalment, history, pertinent diagnostic imaging results, endourologic and postprocedure details, duration of hospitalization, complications, and outcome (short-term, < 1 month; long-term, ≥ 1 month) were recorded. After flexible urethrocystoscopy, direct percutaneous perineal needle puncture and guidewire placement by means of fluoroscopic guidance (with or without ultrasonography) allowed access to the urethral lumen. The perineal tract was subsequently serially dilated to accommodate a peel-away sheath and rigid endoscope. Rigid urethrocystoscopy was performed, and on completion of endourologic procedures, the access site was left to heal by second intention.

RESULTS 19 male dogs successfully underwent 20 procedures. No intraoperative complications were reported. Short-term outcome was good (ie, mild perineal urine leakage) for 3 dogs and excellent (ie, no abnormalities with urination) for 16. Long-term outcome was excellent for the 17 dogs for which follow-up information was available.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A percutaneous fluoroscopic-assisted perineal approach (with or without ultrasonography) allowed access to the pelvic urethra with no major complications in the present series of patients. This minimally invasive approach may be a valuable tool for endourologic procedures in male dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A dog was examined because of a 6-month history of upper airway stridor that began after postoperative regurgitation of gastric contents.

Clinical Findings—Constant stridor was evident during inspiration and expiration, although it was worse during inspiration. The stridor was no longer evident when the dog's mouth was manually held open. Computed tomography, rhinoscopy, and fluoroscopy were used to confirm a diagnosis of nasopharyngeal stenosis.

Treatment and Outcome—The dog was anesthetized, and balloon dilatation of the stenosis was performed. Prednisone was prescribed for 4 weeks after the procedure to decrease fibrous tissue formation. Although the dog was initially improved, signs recurred 3.5 weeks later, and balloon dilatation was repeated. This time, however, triamcinolone was injected into the area of stenosis at the end of the dilatation procedure. Two months later, although the dog did not have clinical signs of stridor, a third dilatation procedure was performed because mild stenosis was seen on follow-up computed tomographic images; again, triamcinolone was injected into the area of stenosis at the end of the dilatation procedure. Three and 6 months after the third dilatation procedure, the dog reportedly was clinically normal.

Clinical Relevance—Findings suggest that balloon dilatation may be an effective treatment for nasopharyngeal stenosis in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

An 8-year-old spayed female Yorkshire Terrier–Poodle dog was evaluated for persistent pollakiuria and stranguria following routine cystotomy for calcium oxalate cystoliths.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The dog presented for a cystotomy with intermittent hematuria. Postoperative radiographs revealed no remaining cystoliths. Urine, cystolith, and bladder mucosal aerobic cultures were negative. Pollakiuria, stranguria, and hematuria developed immediately after surgery and persisted despite antibiotics. Ultrasound revealed suspected fibrous adhesions within the urinary bladder lumen connecting the dorsal and ventral bladder wall creating a septum. This was confirmed cystoscopically 4 weeks after surgery.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Cystoscopic-guided laser ablation was performed to incise abnormal tissue connecting the ventral and dorsal bladder wall using a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. Three weeks later, ultrasound revealed adhesion resolution though mild pollakiuria and stranguria persisted. Oxybutynin was prescribed and clinical signs resolved. At 27 months after ablation, hematuria occurred with recurrent cystoliths. These cystoliths were removed by percutaneous cystolithotomy, documenting a cystoscopically normal bladder wall. The patient had normal urination for 55.5 months after ablation, with normal bladder wall thickness on ultrasound repeated at 27 and 36 months after ablation.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

To the authors’ knowledge, an adhesion creating a septum between the dorsal and ventral bladder wall has not been previously reported as a complication after cystotomy in any species and should be considered as a cause of persistent lower urinary signs after surgery. Ultrasound identified the lesion in this dog. Because bladder abnormalities can develop quickly after surgery, ultrasound might be considered if urine testing is not supportive of infection. Cystoscopic-guided laser ablation was a successful minimally invasive treatment in this case.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 6-year-old 17-kg (37.4-lb) spayed female mixed-breed dog was evaluated because of swelling and intermittent lameness of the right pelvic limb and perianal and vulvar bleeding caused by a suspected arteriovenous malformation.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The right pelvic limb had a diffuse, raised, cobblestone-like appearance with lameness, edema, and multifocal ulcerations. The abdominal skin had multifocal circular erythematous lesions, the perianal region was erythematous, and the vestibule had superficial distended vessels. Ultrasonography and CT did not reveal the presence of an arteriovenous malformation; however, digital subtraction venography confirmed the presence of a venous malformation (VM) throughout the limb.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

A mixture of foam sclerosant (1.5% sodium tetradecyl sulfate) and contrast medium was agitated with air and injected percutaneously into the VM. The dog received an injection of corticosteroid solution, and a soft-padded bandage was applied to the limb for 3 days. Six weeks later, the dog would intermittently hop when running, and the limb was mildly edematous with ecchymotic lesions; the swelling and lameness had improved considerably. Perianal and vulvar bleeding and dilation of the vestibular vessels had resolved. At 21 months after the procedure, examination revealed no right pelvic limb lameness related to the VM; only small cyst-like lesions and edema around the tarsus remained.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The favorable clinical outcome for this dog for a 21-month period after treatment of a pelvic limb VM with foam sclerotherapy has suggested that foam sclerotherapy may be used to successfully treat limb VMs in some dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—An 11-year-old castrated male mixed-breed dog was examined for a 3-month history of hematochezia and tenesmus. Abdominal ultrasonography and rectal examination prior to referral had revealed a colorectal polyp, diagnosed as a benign colorectal polypoid adenoma after histologic examination of tissue samples. The patient was referred for treatment.

Clinical Findings—A 2-cm-diameter sessile polypoid mass was located approximately 6 cm orad to the anus in the right dorsolateral region of the descending colon just caudal to the pubis. There was no evidence of metastasis on thoracic radiography or abdominal ultrasonography. Results of a CBC and serum biochemical analysis were within reference limits.

Treatment and Outcome—Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and snare electrocautery were used to resect the mass and a definitive histopathologic diagnosis of a sessile colorectal polypoid adenoma was made. A 9.9-mm gastroduodenoscope was used during colonoscopy to inspect the mass. To aid in EMR, a 25-gauge endoscopic injection needle was used to infuse sterile saline (0.9% NaCl) solution under the base of the polyp, into the submucosa to elevate the mucosa from the muscularis layer beneath the polyp prior to polypectomy. This was necessary because of the sessile, rather than pedunculated, base of the mass. The entire polyp was successfully removed with endoscopic guidance. The clinical signs of hematochezia and tenesmus resolved immediately, and serial rectal examinations were performed over the following 36 months with no palpable evidence of recurrence.

Clinical Relevance—The patient described in the present report underwent successful colonic EMR and snare polypectomy with no known evidence of mass recurrence during the following 36 months, suggesting that this minimally invasive procedure may be a valuable treatment option for sessile polyps. The advantage of this technique was that elevation of the mucosa via injection of saline solution improved visibility of the polyp and helped to separate the polyp base from the deeper submucosal colorectal tissue, making complete resection possible.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe and evaluate the outcome of cystoscopic-guided laser ablation of intramural ureteral ectopia in male dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—4 incontinent male dogs with intramural ureteral ectopia.

Procedures—Intramural ectopic ureters were diagnosed via preoperative computed tomography–IV urography and subsequent cystoscopy. Transurethral cystoscopic-guided laser ablation (diode laser [n = 3 dogs] and holmium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser [1]) was performed to proximally relocate the ectopic ureteral orifice to the urinary bladder. Fluoroscopy was used during the procedures to confirm that the ureteral tract was intramural and the ureteral orifice was intravesicular after the procedure. In 1 dog with bilateral ureteral ectopia, staged laser ablation was performed at 6-week intervals because of difficulty viewing the second ureter on the first attempt. All ureteral orifices were initially located in the middle to proximal portion of the prostatic portion of the urethra. Six weeks after surgery, imaging was repeated in 3 of 4 dogs.

Results—Postoperative dysuria or hematuria did not develop. All dogs were immediately continent after laser treatment and remained so at a median follow-up period of 18 months (range, 15 to 20 months) without medical management.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ureteral ectopia can cause urinary incontinence in male dogs and is usually associated with other urinary tract abnormalities. Cystoscopicguided laser ablation provided an effective and minimally invasive alternative to surgical management of intramural ureteral ectopia.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 5-year-old spayed female Maltese mixed-breed dog was referred for evaluation because of severe urinary incontinence refractory to medical management.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Physical examination revealed constant dribbling of urine and urine scalding. Culture of a urine sample yielded methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Proteus mirabilis. Abdominal ultrasonographic examination revealed absence of the left kidney, a small, nondistended urinary bladder, and diffuse hepatopathy. Urinary incontinence persisted despite appropriate antimicrobial treatment. Cystourethroscopy and vaginoscopy were subsequently performed and revealed a hypoplastic bladder and a vesicovaginal fistula with urinary leakage through the vaginal diverticulum; no left ureterovesicular junction was identified, consistent with suspected left renal aplasia.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Exploratory laparotomy was performed, and the cranial aspect of the vagina was circumferentially ligated immediately caudal to the fistula. The urinary incontinence resolved immediately after surgery, and lower urinary tract signs improved over the next 2 weeks. Moderate urinary incontinence recurred approximately 6 months later, and a urinary tract infection with Escherichia coli was subsequently identified and treated; clinical signs resolved ≤ 48 hours after treatment was initiated.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

To the author's knowledge, vesicovaginal fistulas in dogs have not been previously described and should be considered a differential diagnosis for persistent urinary incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infections in female dogs. Vaginoscopy in addition to cystourethroscopy was required to identify the abnormality in this patient. Because multiple concurrent anomalies can be present, both procedures should be performed in female dogs with these clinical signs, even if an abnormality is identified cystoscopically.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe the technical aspects and clinical outcome of endoscopic- and fluoroscopic-guided ureteropelvic lavage and ureteral stent placement for treatment of obstructive pyonephrosis in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—13 client-owned dogs (14 obstructed ureters).

Procedures—All patients with obstructive pyonephrosis were treated with a ureteral stent. Medical records were reviewed for history, clinical signs, pre- and postprocedural clinical and imaging data, and short- and long-term outcomes.

Results—13 dogs (14 ureters) had unilateral or bilateral ureteral obstructions and pyonephrosis due to ureterolithiasis (n = 13) or a suspected ureteral stricture (1). Eleven dogs had positive results of bacteriologic culture of urine obtained from the bladder, renal pelvis, or both. Ten were thrombocytopenic, and 8 were azotemic. Stents were placed fluoroscopically with endoscopic (n = 11) or surgical (3) assistance. Median hospitalization time was 48 hours (range, 6 to 260 hours). Median follow-up time was 480 days (range, 2 to 1,460 days). Intraoperative complications occurred in 2 patients (stent occlusion from shearing of a guide wire, and wire penetration of the ureter at the location of a stone). Short-term complications included a bladder hematoma (n = 1) and transient dysuria (1). Long-term complications included stent encrustation (n = 1), stent migration (1), and tissue proliferation at the ureterovesicular junction (5), which had no clinical implications. Recurrent urinary tract infections were documented in 7 dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ureteral stenting was a successful renal-sparing treatment for obstructive pyonephrosis in dogs and could often be performed in a minimally invasive manner. There were few major complications. This technique may be considered as an effective treatment option for this condition in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 9-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat was examined because of hypertension that persisted after resolution of the patient's hyperthyroidism. Bilateral hypertensive retinopathy, a systolic heart murmur, left ventricular hypertrophy, and tachycardia were present.

Clinical Findings—Biochemical analysis revealed mild hypokalemia, normonatremia, high serum creatine kinase activity, high serum aldosterone concentration, and low plasma renin activity consistent with hyperaldosteronism. Hypercalcemia with an associated high serum parathyroid hormone concentration and an exaggerated low-dose dexamethasone suppression test result were consistent with concurrent hyperparathyroidism and hyperadrenocorticism, respectively. Ultrasonographic examination revealed a markedly enlarged left adrenal gland, an abnormally small right adrenal gland, and 2 nodules in the right thyroid and parathyroid glands.

Treatment and Outcome—Laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was performed concurrently with right thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy. Histologic evaluation revealed an adrenal cortical adenoma, thyroid adenoma, and parathyroid adenoma. The cat recovered from surgery without complications. The hypercalcemia and hypertension resolved after surgery. Follow-up echocardiography revealed improvement in the left ventricular hypertrophy. Ultrasonographic examinations performed up to 26 months after adrenalectomy showed no evidence of regrowth of the adrenal mass. The patient survived for 44 months after adrenalectomy with no signs of recurrent hyperaldosteronism or hyperadrenocorticism.

Clinical Relevance—Laparoscopic adrenalectomy may be a plausible method for the treatment of unilateral functional adrenal neoplasia in feline patients when diagnostic imaging has ruled out intravascular invasion and metastatic disease. In addition, in a feline patient with hyperthyroidism and hypertension, other endocrine glands should be investigated.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION 3 cats were referred for evaluation of chronic urinary incontinence.

CLINICAL FINDINGS A presumptive diagnosis of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) was made in all 3 cats. Preoperatively, incontinence was mild in 1 cat (incontinence during sleep) and moderate to severe (incontinence while awake and at rest) in 2. Structural abnormalities noted during cystoscopy included urethrovestibular junction stenosis (n = 1), vaginal stenosis (1), short urethra (1), and intrapelvic bladder (1).

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME All 3 cats were treated by means of implantation of an inflatable silicone hydraulic occluder (HO) via a ventral midline celiotomy. Immediately prior to HO implantation, patients underwent cystoscopy to detect any anatomic abnormalities and confirm the absence of ureteral ectopia. Following surgery, all 3 patients attained complete continence, needing 0 or 1 inflation of the device. Complications included cystoscopy-associated urethral tear (n = 1), constipation (1), stranguria (1), hematuria (2), and urinary tract infection (2). Device explantation was performed 14 weeks after surgery in 1 cat because of postoperative constipation. Constipation persisted and urinary incontinence recurred but was markedly improved following device removal in this cat (leakage of urine only when sleeping at follow-up 29 months after surgery [26 months after device explantation]). At the time of last follow-up, 2 of the 3 cats remained fully continent approximately 3 and 6 years after device implantation.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that implantation of an HO may be a safe and effective long-term treatment for some cats with USMI. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the potential for treatment-related complications and the long-term outcome.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association