Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Allison Taylor x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Determine locoregional diagnostic yield of 4-site screening (head, neck, chest, and abdomen) to diagnose metastatic disease or clinically significant comorbid diseases in dogs with oral cancer.

ANIMALS

381 dogs with histologically confirmed oral tumors.

METHODS

Medical records from 381 dogs with histologically confirmed oral tumors that underwent preoperative screening were retrospectively reviewed.

RESULTS

Skull and neck CT scan was performed on 348 patients. Bone lysis was present in 74.4% of tumors. Oral squamous cell carcinoma, sarcomas, and T2-T3 (> 2 cm) tumors had a significantly (P < .05) increased incidence of lysis compared to odontogenic and T1 (< 2 cm) tumors, respectively. Minor incidental findings were present in 60.6% of CT scans. Major incidental findings were found in 4.6% of scans. The risk of diagnosing an incidental finding increased by 10% and 20% per year of age for minor and major findings, respectively. Lymph node metastasis was diagnosed with CT or cytology in 7.5% of cases (10.7% of nonodontogenic tumors, 0% of odontogenic tumors). Oral malignant melanoma, oral squamous cell carcinoma, and T3 tumors had the highest prevalence of metastatic disease at the time of staging. The presence of bone lysis was not associated with cervical metastasis.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Major incidental findings were rare (< 5%) but primarily included secondary extraoral tumors. Lymphatic metastasis was diagnosed in 10.7% of nonodontogenic tumors, but cytology was not performed in the majority of cases and often included only a single mandibular node. Therefore, these results likely underestimate the incidence of lymphatic metastasis. Guided lymph node sampling is highly recommended, especially for oral malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and T2-T3 tumors.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Determine diagnostic yield of chest, abdomen, and 4-site screening to diagnose metastatic disease and secondary diseases of prognostic significance in dogs with oral cancer.

SAMPLE

Medical records from 381 dogs with histologically confirmed oral tumors that underwent preoperative screening were retrospectively reviewed.

RESULTS

Thoracic metastasis was diagnosed in 4.9% (0.9% odontogenic, 6.5% nonodontogenic) of oral tumors. Oral malignant melanoma and multilobular osteochondrosarcoma were most at risk. Abdominal metastasis was diagnosed in 2% of oral tumors (0% odontogenic, 3.1% nonodontogenic) and cytologically confirmed in 2 cases (0.6% [2/295)] of all abdominal ultrasounds (AUS) 5.5% [2/36] of all AUS that had cytology). Both cases had oral malignant melanoma. Incidental disease was diagnosed in 53.1% and 81.3% of thoracic and abdominal screenings, respectively. Major findings were more common in AUS (7.8%) compared to thoracic screening (1.9%). The prevalence of incidental findings was similar for odontogenic and nonodontogenic tumors. Both metastasis and major findings were diagnosed more commonly with thoracic CT compared to radiographs. Metastasis or a major finding of prognostic significance was diagnosed in at least 1 test in 27.8% of patients that had head CT, lymph node cytology, thoracic screening, and AUS (n = 115).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Major incidental findings were more commonly detected with AUS and were diagnosed in 1 in every 12 patients. However, metastatic disease was most commonly detected with thoracic screening. When all 4 screening tests are performed, there is an approximately 1 in 4 chance of diagnosing metastasis or major significant disease regardless of tumor type.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 4-year-old Arabian-cross mare was examined because of a 48-hour history of pyrexia, lethargy, and signs of abdominal discomfort.

Clinical Findings—On initial evaluation, the horse was in good body condition, but febrile, tachycardic, tachypneic, and icteric and had signs of colic. Findings on CBC and serum biochemical analysis indicated marked systemic inflammation and hepatocellular damage. Serial abdominal ultrasonographic examinations revealed progressive, localized hepatic parenchymal abnormalities in the left ventral aspect of the abdomen in proximity to the left liver lobes, and eventual identification of an irregularly marginated, hyperechoic walled region of heterogenous echogenicity consistent with an encapsulated hepatic abscess.

Treatment and Outcome—Medical treatment was initiated with administration of doxycycline and flunixin meglumine. After 7 days, the horse's clinical signs and hematologic values improved. After 14 days, the horse was discharged from the hospital and prescribed continuation of doxycycline treatment for 14 days. One week following hospital discharge, the horse was reevaluated for recurrent signs of colic and pyrexia. The horse was sedated, and the region overlying the caudal aspect of the seventh rib was desensitized with an inverted L nerve block by local infiltration with 2% lidocaine. While the horse was standing and sedated, drainage of an encapsulated intra-abdominal abscess was followed by rib resection and removal of a portion of necrotic left lateral liver lobe. The development of a pneumothorax following rib resection represented the only major surgical complication. Twelve months later, the horse was clinically normal and had returned to its previous level of performance.

Clinical Relevance—Rib resection in standing sedated horses, together with appropriate medical management, should be considered an option for removal of well-encapsulated cranially located intra-abdominal abscesses that are adherent to the ventrolateral aspect of the body wall in horses.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association