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  • Author or Editor: Allan J. Paul x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the safety of moxidectin administration at doses of 30, 60, and 90 µg/kg of body weight (10, 20, and 30 times the manufacturer's recommended dose) in avermectin-sensitive Collies.

Animals—24 Collies.

Procedure—Collies with mild to severe reactions to ivermectin challenge (120 mg/kg; 20 times the recommended dose for heartworm prevention) were used. Six replicates of 4 dogs each were formed on the basis of body weight and severity of reaction to ivermectin test dose. Within replicates, each dog was randomly allocated to treatment with oral administration of 30, 60, or 90 µg of moxidectin/kg or was given a comparable volume of placebo tablet formulation. Dogs were observed hourly for the first 8 hours and twice daily thereafter for 1 month for signs of toxicosis.

Results—Signs of toxicosis were not observed in any control group dog throughout the treatment observation period. Likewise, signs of toxicosis were not observed in any dog receiving moxidectin at 30, 60, or 90 µg/kg.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The moxidectin formulation used in the study reported here appears to have a wider margin of safety than ivermectin or milbemycin in avermectin-sensitive Collies. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:482–483)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether signs of avermectin (AVM)-milbemycin (MB) toxicosis would be evident in AVM-MB–sensitive Collies after treatment with an experimental formulation of spinosad alone or spinosad combined with MB 5-oxime (MBO) at doses up to 5 and 10 times the MBO maximum label dose.

Animals—20 adult Collies homozygous or heterozygous for the MDR1 gene mutation that had signs of toxicosis after oral administration of ivermectin.

Procedures—On the basis of AVM-MB sensitivity score, each dog was assigned in a randomized block design to 1 of 5 treatment groups (control group, 300 mg of spinosad/kg [5 times maximum label dose], 180 mg of spinosad/kg with 3 mg of MBO/kg [3 times maximum MBO label dose], 300 mg of spinosad/kg with 5 mg of MBO/kg, and 300 mg of spinosad/kg with 10 mg of MBO/kg). Treatments were administered orally as a sequence of single doses during 5 consecutive days. After a 28-day washout period, treatment sequences were repeated. Posttreatment observation and scoring by blinded observers were conducted to specifically include neurologic abnormalities typical of AVM-MB toxicosis, such as signs of depression, ataxia, mydriasis, and hypersalivation.

Results—No signs of AVM-MB toxicosis were attributed to treatment in any dog during the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that oral administration of spinosad at 300 mg/kg alone or in combination with MBO at doses up to 10 mg/kg did not cause signs of AVM-MB toxicosis in AVM-MB–sensitive dogs with the MDR1 gene mutation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the safety of dermal application of 10.0% imidacloprid-0.08% ivermectin in ivermectin- sensitive Collies at dose rates of 3 to 5 times the proposed maximum therapeutic dose.

Animals—15 Collies (5 males and 10 females) that were confirmed as ivermectin-sensitive dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were assigned to 3 treatment groups (control, 3×, or 5× group) in a randomized block design on the basis of the maximal ivermectinsensitivity score obtained during preliminary screening. Dogs in groups 3× and 5× were treated at 3 and 5 times the maximum label dose, respectively. Control dogs received an application of an equal volume of a nonmedicated solution. Observation and scoring on all days were conducted to specifically include neurologic signs typical of ivermectin toxicosis, including lethargy, ataxia, abnormal mydriasis, and abnormal salivation.

Results—None of the dogs had clinical abnormalities during the study period.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Analysis of results of this study indicates that dermal application of 10.0% imidacloprid-0.08% ivermectin is safe for use in ivermectin-sensitive Collies at dose rates of 3 or 5 times the proposed maximum therapeutic dose. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:277–278)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research