Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for

  • Author or Editor: Alexander Valverde x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare 3 types of noxious stimuli applied to various anatomic areas of anesthetized dogs and rabbits for determination of the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC).

Animals—10 dogs and 10 rabbits.

Procedure—Dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane and halothane in a randomized order. Rabbits were anesthetized with isoflurane. The MAC was determined by skin incision on the lateral aspect of the chest; clamping of the tail, paw of the forelimb, and paw of the hind limb; and application of electrical current to the oral mucosa (dogs only), forelimb, and hind limb. The MAC was the end-tidal concentration midway between the value permitting and preventing purposeful movement in response to noxious stimuli.

Results—In dogs, mean ± SEM MAC for isoflurane was 1.27 ± 0.05% for clamping stimuli, 1.36 ± 0.04% for oral electrical stimulation, 1.35 ± 0.04% for electrical stimulation to the limbs, and 1.01 ± 0.07% for surgical incision. The MAC for halothane was 0.97 ± 0.03% for tail clamping, 0.96 ± 0.03% for clamping of the limbs, 1.04 ± 0.03% for electrical stimulation, and 0.75 ± 0.06% for surgical incision. In rabbits, MAC for isoflurane was 2.08 ± 0.02% for clamping stimuli, 2.04 ± 0.02% for electrical stimulation, and 0.90 ± 0.02% for surgical incision. The MAC for surgical incision was significantly lower than values for the other methods in both species.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of electrical current and clamping techniques resulted in similar MAC values. Surgical incision underestimated MAC values in dogs and rabbits. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:957–962)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of dobutamine, norepinephrine, and vasopressin on cardiovascular function and gastric mucosal perfusion in anesthetized foals during isoflurane-induced hypotension.

Animals—6 foals that were 1 to 5 days of age.

Procedures—6 foals received 3 vasoactive drugs with at least 24 hours between treatments. Treatments consisted of dobutamine (4 and 8 μg/kg/min), norepinephrine (0.3 and 1.0 μg/kg/min), and vasopressin (0.3 and 1.0 mU/kg/min) administered IV. Foals were maintained at a steady hypotensive state induced by a deep level of isoflurane anesthesia for 30 minutes, and baseline cardiorespiratory variables were recorded. Vasoactive drugs were administered at the low infusion rate for 15 minutes, and cardiorespiratory variables were recorded. Drugs were then administered at the high infusion rate for 15 minutes, and cardiorespiratory variables were recorded a third time. Gastric mucosal perfusion was measured by tonometry at the same time points.

Results—Dobutamine and norepinephrine administration improved cardiac index. Vascular resistance was increased by norepinephrine and vasopressin administration but decreased by dobutamine at the high infusion rate. Blood pressure was increased by all treatments but was significantly higher during the high infusion rate of norepinephrine. Oxygen delivery was significantly increased by norepinephrine and dobutamine administration; O2 consumption decreased with dobutamine. The O2 extraction ratio was decreased following norepinephrine and dobutamine treatments. The gastric to arterial CO2gap was significantly increased during administration of vasopressin at the high infusion rate.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Norepinephrine and dobutamine are better alternatives than vasopressin for restoring cardiovascular function and maintaining splanchnic circulation during isofluraneinduced hypotension in neonatal foals.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare cardiac output (CO) measured by use of the partial carbon dioxide rebreathing method (NICO) or lithium dilution method (LiDCO) in anesthetized foals.

Sample Population—Data reported in 2 other studies for 18 neonatal foals that weighed 32 to 61 kg.

Procedures—Foals were anesthetized and instrumented to measure direct blood pressure, heart rate, arterial blood gases, end-tidal isoflurane and carbon dioxide concentrations, and CO. Various COs were achieved by administration of dobutamine, norepinephrine, vasopressin, phenylephrine, and isoflurane to allow comparisons between LiDCO and NICO methods. Measurements were obtained in duplicate or triplicate. We allowed 2 minutes between measurements for LiDCO and 3 minutes for NICO after achieving a stable hemodynamic plane for at least 10 to 15 minutes at each CO.

Results—217 comparisons were made. Correlation (r = 0.77) was good between the 2 methods for all determinations. Mean ± SD measurements of cardiac index for all comparisons with the LiDCO and NICO methods were 138 ± 62 mL/kg/min (range, 40 to 381 mL/kg/min) and 154 ± 55 mL/kg/min (range, 54 to 358 mL/kg/min), respectively. Mean difference (bias) between LiDCO and NICO measurements was −17.3 mL/kg/min with a precision (1.96 × SD) of 114 mL/kg/min (range, −131.3 to 96.7). Mean of the differences of LiDCO and NICO measurements was 4.37 + (0.87 × NICO value).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The NICO method is a viable, noninvasive method for determination of CO in neonatal foals with normal respiratory function. It compares well with the more invasive LiDCO method.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare cardiac output (CO) measured by lithium arterial pressure waveform analysis (PULSECO) and CO measured by transpulmonary pulse contour analysis (PICCO) in anesthetized foals, with CO measured by use of lithium dilution (LIDCO) considered the criterion-referenced standard.

Sample Population—6 neonatal (1- to 4-day-old) foals that weighed 38 to 45 kg.

Procedures—Foals were anesthetized and instrumented to measure direct blood pressure, heart rate, arterial blood gases, and CO. The CO was measured by use of PULSECO, PICCO, and LIDCO techniques. Measurements were converted to specific CO (sCO) values for statistical analysis. Measurements were obtained during low, intermediate, and high CO states.

Results—sCO ranged from 75.5 to 310 mL/kg/min. Mean ± SD PICCO bias varied significantly among CO states and was −51.9 ± 23.1 mL/kg/min, 20.0 ± 19.5 mL/kg/min, and 87.2 ± 19.5 mL/kg/min at low, intermediate, and high CO states, respectively. Mean PULSECO bias (11.0 ± 37.5 mL/kg/min) was significantly lower than that of PICCO and did not vary among CO states. Concordance correlation coefficient between LIDCO and PULSECO was significantly greater than that between LIDCO and PICCO. The proportion of observations with a relative bias < ± 30% was significantly lower with the PULSECO method than with the PICCO method.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Values for the PULSECO method were more reproducible and agreed better with values for the LIDCO method than did values for the PICCO method and were able to more accurately monitor changes in CO in anesthetized newborn foals.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the cardiopulmonary effects of IV fentanyl administration in dogs during isoflurane anesthesia and during anesthetic recovery with or without dexmedetomidine or acepromazine.

Animals—7 sexually intact male purpose-bred hound-type dogs aged 11 to 12 months.

Procedures—Dogs received a loading dose of fentanyl (5 μg/kg, IV) followed by an IV infusion (5 μg/kg/h) for 120 minutes while anesthetized with isoflurane and for an additional 60 minutes after anesthesia was discontinued. Dogs were randomly assigned in a crossover design to receive dexmedetomidine (2.5 μg/kg), acepromazine (0.05 mg/kg), or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (1 mL) IV after anesthesia ceased. Cardiopulmonary data were obtained during anesthesia and for 90 minutes after treatment administration during anesthetic recovery.

Results—Concurrent administration of fentanyl and isoflurane resulted in significant decreases in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac index and a significant increase in Paco2. All but Paco2 returned to pretreatment values before isoflurane anesthesia was discontinued. During recovery, dexmedetomidine administration resulted in significant decreases in heart rate, cardiac index, and mixed venous oxygen tension and a significant increase in arterial blood pressure, compared with values for saline solution and acepromazine treatments. Acepromazine administration resulted in significantly lower blood pressure and higher cardiac index and Po2 in mixed venous blood than did the other treatments. Dexmedetomidine treatment resulted in significantly lower values for Pao2 and arterial pH and higher Paco2 values than both other treatments.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Fentanyl resulted in transient pronounced cardiorespiratory effects when administered during isoflurane anesthesia. During anesthetic recovery, when administered concurrently with an IV fentanyl infusion, dexmedetomidine resulted in evidence of cardiopulmonary compromise and acepromazine transiently improved cardiopulmonary performance.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of IV diphenhydramine hydrochloride administration on cardiorespiratory variables in anesthetized dogs undergoing mast cell tumor (MCT) excision.

DESIGN Randomized, blinded clinical trial.

ANIMALS 16 client-owned dogs with MCTs.

PROCEDURES In a standardized isoflurane anesthesia session that included mechanical ventilation, dogs received diphenhydramine hydrochloride (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], IV; n = 8) or an equivalent volume of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (IV; control treatment; 8) 10 minutes after induction. Cardiorespiratory variables were recorded throughout anesthesia and MCT excision, and blood samples for determination of plasma diphenhydramine and histamine concentrations were collected prior to premedication (baseline), throughout anesthesia, and 2 hours after extubation.

RESULTS Cardiorespiratory values in both treatment groups were acceptable for anesthetized dogs. Mean ± SD diastolic arterial blood pressure was significantly lower in the diphenhydramine versus control group during tumor dissection (52 ± 10 mm Hg vs 62 ± 9 mm Hg) and surgical closure (51 ± 10 mm Hg vs 65 ± 9 mm Hg). Mean arterial blood pressure was significantly lower in the diphenhydramine versus control group during surgical closure (65 ± 12 mm Hg vs 78 ± 11 mm Hg), despite a higher cardiac index value. Plasma histamine concentrations were nonsignificantly higher than baseline during maximal manipulation of the tumor and surgical preparation in the diphenhydramine group and during surgical dissection in the control group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE IV administration of diphenhydramine prior to MCT excision had no clear clinical cardiorespiratory benefits over placebo in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of increasing doses of remifentanil hydrochloride administered via constant rate infusion (CRI) on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in cats.

Animals—6 healthy adult cats.

Procedures—For each cat, 2 experiments were performed (2-week interval). On each study day, anesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane; a catheter was placed in a cephalic vein for the administration of lactated Ringer's solution or remifentanil CRIs, and a catheter was placed in the jugular vein for collection of blood samples for blood gas analyses. On the first study day, individual basal MAC (MACBasal) was determined for each cat. On the second study day, 3 remifentanil CRIs (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 μg/kg/min) were administered (in ascending order); for each infusion, at least 30 minutes elapsed before determination of MAC (designated as MACR0.25, MACR0.5, and MACR1.0, respectively). A 15-minute washout period was allowed between CRIs. A control MAC (MACControl) was determined after the last remifentanil infusion.

Results—Mean ± SD MACBasal and MACControl values at sea level did not differ significantly (1.66 ± 0.08% and 1.52 ± 0.21%, respectively). The MAC values determined for each remifentanil CRI did not differ significantly. However, MACR0.25, MACR0.5, and MACR1.0 were significantly decreased, compared with MACBasal, by 23.4 ± 7.9%, 29.8 ± 8.3%, and 26.0 ± 9.4%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The 3 doses of remifentanil administered via CRI resulted in a similar degree of isoflurane MAC reduction in adult cats, indicating that a ceiling effect was achieved following administration of the lowest dose.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effectiveness and safety of 2 sedative-analgesic protocols to facilitate assisted ventilation in healthy dogs.

Animals—12 healthy dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were randomly assigned to 2 groups. Mean dosages for protocol 1 were diazepam (0.5 mg/kg/h [n = 3 dogs]) or midazolam (0.5 mg/kg/h [3]), morphine (0.6 mg/kg/h [6]), and medetomidine (1.0 μg/kg/h [6]). Mean dosages for protocol 2 were diazepam (0.5 mg/kg/h [n = 3]) or midazolam (0.5 mg/kg/h [3]), fentanyl (18 μg/kg/h [6]), and propofol (2.5 mg/kg/h [6]). Each dog received the drugs for 24 consecutive hours. All dogs were mechanically ventilated with adjustments in minute volume to maintain normocapnia and normoxemia. Cardiorespiratory variables were recorded. A numeric comfort score was assigned hourly to assess efficacy. Mouth care, position change, and physiotherapy were performed every 6 hours. Urine output was measured every 4 hours.

Results—Use of both protocols maintained dogs within optimal comfort ranges > 85% of the time. The first dog in each group was excluded from the study. Significant decreases in heart rate, oxygen consumption, and oxygen extraction ratio were evident for protocol 1. Cardiac index values in ventilated dogs were lower than values reported for healthy unsedated dogs. Oxygen delivery, lactate concentration, and arterial base excess remained within reference ranges for both protocols.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of both protocols was effective for facilitating mechanical ventilation. A reduction in cardiac index was detected for both protocols as a result of bradycardia. However, oxygen delivery and global tissue perfusion were not negatively affected.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research