Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Alessio Pierini x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report abdominal ultrasonography (AUS) findings in dogs with clinical signs of acute pancreatitis (AP) during the first 2 days of hospitalization and to compare AUS findings with severity of disease and mortality rate.

ANIMALS

37 client-owned dogs with clinical signs of AP.

PROCEDURES

Dogs suspected of having AP with complete medical records, AUS examinations performed throughout the first 2 days of hospitalization, and available frozen surplus serum samples for quantitative measurement of canine pancreatic lipase (cPL) concentrations at hospital admission met the criteria for study inclusion. Dogs were grouped as AUS+ or AUS− on the basis of positive or negative findings for AP on AUS, respectively. Abdominal ultra-sonography findings of AP were stratified (as mild, moderate, or severe) by use of an AUS severity index, and a canine acute pancreatitis severity score was calculated.

RESULTS

24 of 37 (64.8%) dogs had AUS findings of AP at hospital admission, whereas 10 had positive findings for AP on AUS within 2 days of hospitalization. Three (8%) dogs were AUS− but had serum cPL concentrations > 400 µg/L (ie, values considered diagnostic for AP). On the AUS severity index, 5 of 34 (14.7%) AUS+ dogs had mild findings, 18 (52.9%) AUS+ dogs had moderate findings, and 11 (32.4%) AUS+ dogs had severe findings. Severe findings were associated with a higher risk of death than mild and moderate findings. A significant association was found between canine acute pancreatitis severity scores and mortality rates.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

For dogs with clinical signs of AP, repeated AUS examinations during hospitalization should be performed, severe findings on the AUS severity index may indicate an increased risk of death, and serum cPL concentrations may increase earlier than findings on AUS of AP.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To prospectively evaluate the clinical and prognostic importance of duodenal endoscopic and histologic findings, including duodenal mucosal counts of forkhead box P3-positive regulatory T cells (Foxp3+ Tregs), in dogs with immunosuppressant-responsive enteropathy (IRE).

ANIMALS

57 client-owned dogs with IRE.

PROCEDURES

The canine chronic enteropathy clinical activity index (CCECAI) was used to assess each dog when IRE was diagnosed (T0) and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months later. Dogs were grouped on the basis of clinical response (responder group vs nonresponder group) and 12-month long-term outcome (responded to treatment and did not relapse [good outcome group] vs did not respond to treatment or had relapsed [bad outcome group]). At T0, dogs underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy and endoscopic biopsy, with results for variables of duodenal endoscopic and histologic evaluations scored and compared across groups.

RESULTS

At T0, the overall median CCECAI score was 7; CCECAI score was not associated with clinical response or relapse. Dogs had significantly greater odds of being in the bad outcome group (vs the good outcome group) if they had a histologic score of 3 (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.09 to 11.3). No differences in the counts of Foxp3+ Tregs were detected between groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In dogs with IRE, results indicated that evaluation of Foxp3+ Tregs did not have prognostic value, whereas a duodenal histologic score of 3 could be a negative prognostic factor for response and relapse, and higher severity scores for intraepithelial lymphocytes and lamina propria lymphocytes and plasma cells in duodenal biopsy samples may be negatively associated with response.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate ultrasound-guided placement of an anchor wire (AW) or injection of methylene blue (MB) to aid in the intraoperative localization of peripheral lymph nodes in dogs and cats.

ANIMALS

125 dogs and 10 cats with a total of 171 lymphadenectomies.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of dogs and cats that underwent peripheral lymphadenectomies with or without (N) the AW or MB localization technique were reviewed. Data retrieved included clinical, surgical, and histologic findings. The proportions of successful lymphadenectomies, lymph node characteristics, and complications among the 3 groups were analyzed.

RESULTS

143 (84%) lymph nodes were successfully excised. Lymphadenectomy success was significantly affected by the localization technique, with 94% for group AW, 87% for group MB, and 72% for group N. Lymph node size was smaller in groups AW and MB, compared with group N. Duration of lymphadenectomy was shorter in group AW, compared with groups MB and N, and in group MB, compared with group N. Intra- (7%) and postoperative (10%) complications and final diagnosis did not significantly differ among groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Both lymph node localization techniques were highly successful and reduced surgery time, compared with unassisted lymphadenectomy. Specifically, these techniques were effective for localization of normal-sized and nonpalpable lymph nodes and were efficient and practical options for peripheral lymphadenectomies, particularly for those that were small or nonpalpable.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association