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  • Author or Editor: Alessandra C. Santamaria x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate adverse events and outcomes in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated with limb amputation followed by a single SC infusion of carboplatin.

ANIMALS

45 client-owned dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated with limb amputation and SC infusion of carboplatin between January 1, 2006, and January 15, 2017.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed, and data collected included signalment, tumor location, treatment, results of clinicopathologic analyses and diagnostic imaging, adverse effects of chemotherapy, metastasis-free interval, survival time, and communications with owners and referring veterinarians. Findings were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Mantel-Haenszel log-rank test.

RESULTS

45 dogs were identified that met the inclusion criteria (12 of the 45 dogs had been reported in a previous case series). No dogs had pulmonary metastases detectable by CT or radiography before treatment. All dogs completed the protocol as planned. Median survival time (MST) was 196 days; metastasis-free interval was 197 days. Three of the 45 (7%) dogs required hospitalization for gastrointestinal signs related to chemotherapy. There were no chemotherapy-related deaths.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that although treatment with SC infusion of carboplatin was well tolerated, the MST for dogs in the present study was similar to reported MSTs in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated with limb amputation alone and was in the lower range of historically reported survival times for dogs receiving IV adjunctive chemotherapy. Therefore, we could not recommend this protocol of SC infusion of carboplatin but recommended that protocols with IV administration of carboplatin be used instead.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcomes for dogs with soft tissue sarcomas in the distal aspects of the limbs that underwent second intention healing after wide excision (2-cm lateral surgical margins and a margin 1 fascial plane deep) of the tumors.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—31 dogs with soft tissue sarcomas in the distal aspects of the limbs that underwent second intention healing following wide local excision of their tumors.

Procedures—Tumors were excised with 2-cm lateral margins and a margin 1 fascial plane deep to tumors. Wounds healed by means of second intention. Time to healing, complications during healing, and information regarding tumor recurrence were recorded.

Results—All tumors were excised with histologically tumor-free margins. Twenty-nine (93.5%) wounds healed completely by second intention (median time, 53 days). Two (6.5%) dogs required free skin graft procedures to facilitate healing. Complications during open wound management developed for 7 (22.6%) dogs. Long-term complications were detected for 8 (25.8%) dogs, including intermittent epidermal disruption (5/31 [16.1%]) and wound contracture (3/31 [9.7%]). All complications were managed conservatively. Local tumor recurrence was detected for 1 (3.2%) dog. Median follow-up time was 980 days (range, 380 to 2,356 days). No patients died because of tumor-related causes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study indicated second intention healing of large wounds in the distal aspects of the limbs was complete and typically without complications for dogs that underwent wide excision of soft tissue sarcomas. Wide local excision of soft tissue sarcomas in the distal aspects of the limbs with 2-cm lateral margins and margins 1 fascial plane deep to the tumors provided excellent long-term local tumor control.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association