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  • Author or Editor: Aleksandra Domanjko-Petrič x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the dose of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) needed to achieve at least a 3-fold increase in plasma CoQ10 concentration in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) and congestive heart failure (CHF).

ANIMALS

18 dogs with CHF due to MMVD and 12 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES

In a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial, dogs with MMVD were given 50 or 100 mg of water-soluble CoQ10 (ubiquinone; total daily dose, 100 mg [n = 5] or 200 mg [6]) or a placebo (7), PO, twice a day for 2 weeks in addition to regular cardiac treatment. Plasma CoQ10 concentration was measured in dogs with MMVD before (baseline) and at various time points after supplementation began and in healthy dogs once. Concentrations were compared among and within groups.

RESULTS

No significant difference in median baseline plasma CoQ10 concentration was detected between healthy dogs and dogs with MMVD. Fold increases in plasma CoQ10 concentrations ranged from 1.7 to 4.7 and 3.2 to 6.8 for individual dogs in the 100-mg and 200-mg groups, respectively. The change in plasma CoQ10 concentration after supplementation began was significantly higher than in the placebo group at 4 hours and 1 and 2 weeks for dogs in the 200-mg group and at 1 and 2 weeks for dogs in the 100-mg group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

A daily CoQ10 dose of 200 mg was sufficient to achieve at least a 3-fold increase in plasma CoQ10 concentration and may be used in CoQ10 supplementation studies involving dogs with CHF due to MMVD.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the plasma total antioxidant capacity, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity, whole blood glutathione peroxidase activity, and plasma coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) concentration in dogs with various stages of cardiovascular diseases and in healthy dogs; assess the influence of cardiac treatment on the levels of antioxidant variables, plasma CoQ10 concentration, and serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentration, and determine any correlation between the disease severity (NT-proBNP concentration) and antioxidant variables or CoQ10 concentration.

ANIMALS 43 dogs with various types and stages of cardiovascular diseases (congenital and acquired) and 29 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES Blood samples were collected from all dogs for spectrophotometric assessment of antioxidant variables. Plasma CoQ10 concentration was determined with a high-performance liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization–tandem mass spectrometry method. Serum NT-proBNP concentration was measured with an ELISA.

RESULTS Values for antioxidant variables did not differ among groups of dogs with cardiovascular diseases, regardless of disease stage or treatment. Plasma CoQ10 concentration was significantly increased in treated dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF), compared with untreated patients. However, plasma CoQ10 concentration did not differ among heart failure classes. A significant, negative correlation between serum NT-proBNP and plasma CoQ10 concentrations was identified in treated CHF-affected dogs, suggesting that low plasma CoQ10 concentration may be associated with increased severity of CHF.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The antioxidant variables evaluated were not altered in dogs with CHF, regardless of cardiac disease stage or treatment. Further investigation into the possible effects of CoQ10 supplementation in dogs with advanced stages of CHF is warranted.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the role of the phospholamban gene in purebred large-breed dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM).

Animals—6 dogs with DCM, including 2 Doberman Pinschers, 2 Newfoundlands, and 2 Great Danes.

Procedure—All dogs had clinical signs of congestive heart failure, and a diagnosis of DCM was made on the basis of echocardiographic findings. Blood samples were collected from each dog, and genomic DNA was isolated by a salt extraction method. Specific oligonucleotides were designed to amplify the promoter, exon 1, the 5'-part of exon 2 including the complete coding region, and part of intron 1 of the canine phospholamban gene via polymerase chain reaction procedures. These regions were screened for mutations in DNA obtained from the 6 dogs with DCM.

Results—No mutations were identified in the promoter, 5' untranslated region, part of intron 1, part of the 3' untranslated region, and the complete coding region of the phospholamban gene in dogs with DCM .

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that mutations in the phospholamban gene are not a frequent cause of DCM in Doberman Pinschers, Newfoundlands, and Great Danes. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:432–436)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research