Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Alain P. Théon x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To determine progression-free and overall survival times of cats with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the nasal planum following treatment with a single fraction of strontium Sr 90 (90Sr).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—49 cats with SCC of the nasal planum.

Procedures—Information including FIV infection status, diagnosis of SCC vs SCC in situ (ie, evidence that the tumor did or did not penetrate the epidermal basement membrane, respectively), 90Sr dose and number of probe applications, treatment-related response and complications, and recurrence of SCC and new lesion development was obtained from medical records. The relationships of these variables with calculated progression-free and overall survival times were assessed.

Results—Of 49 cats that underwent 90Sr plesiotherapy (median dose, 128 Gy), 48 (98%) had a response to treatment and 43 (88%) had a complete response. Median progression-free and overall survival times were 1,710 and 3,076 days, respectively. Treatment complications were infrequent (4 [8%] cats) and mild. Following treatment, the SCC recurrence rate was 20% (10/49 cats); 16 (33%) cats developed new lesions in other locations. Overall survival time was significantly longer for cats with a complete response to treatment than for those with a partial response. None of the other variables evaluated had a significant effect on progression-free or overall survival time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Treatment of cats with SCC of the nasal planum with a single fraction of 90Sr appeared to be effective and well tolerated. Initial response to treatment was predictive of overall survival time.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess the influence of tumor cell proliferation and sex-hormone receptors on the efficacy of megavoltage irradiation for dogs with incompletely resected meningiomas.

Design—Longitudinal clinical trial.

Animals—20 dogs with incompletely resected intracranial meningiomas.

Procedure—Dogs were treated with 48 Gy of radiation administered 3 times per week on an alternateday schedule of 4 Gy/fraction for 4 weeks, using bilateral parallel-opposed fields.

Results—Tumor proliferative fraction measured by immunohistochemical detection of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PFPCNA index) ranged from 10 to 42% (median, 24%). Progesterone receptor immunoreactivity was detected in 70% of tumors. Estrogen receptor immunoreactivity was not detected. An inverse correlation was found between detection of progesterone receptors and the PFPCNA index. The overall 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate was 68%. The only prognostic factor that significantly affected PFS rate was the PFPCNA index. The 2-year PFS was 42% for tumors with a high PFPCNA index (value ≥ 24%) and 91% for tumors with a low PFPCNA index (value < 24%). Tumors with a high PFPCNA index were 9.1 times as likely to recur as were tumors with a low PFPCNA index.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—This study confirms the value of irradiation for dogs with incompletely resected meningiomas. Prognostic value of the PFPCNA index suggests that duration of treatment and interval from surgery to start of irradiation may affect outcome. Loss of progesterone receptors in some tumors may be responsible for an increase in PFPCNA index and may indirectly affect prognosis after radiation therapy. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216: 701–707)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the incidence of bovine papillomavirus (BPV) type 1 or 2 in sarcoids and other samples of cutaneous tissues collected from horses in the western United States.

Animals—55 horses with sarcoids and 12 horses without sarcoids.

Procedure—Tissue samples (tumor and normal skin from horses with sarcoids and normal skin, papillomas, and nonsarcoid cutaneous neoplasms from horses without sarcoids) were collected. Tissue samples were analyzed for BPV-1 or -2 DNA, using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism. The PCR products from 7 sarcoid- affected horses were sequenced to evaluate percentage homology with expected sequences for BPV-1 or -2.

Results—Most (94/96, 98%) sarcoids contained BPV DNA. Sixty-two percent of the tumors examined had restriction enzyme patterns consistent with BPV-2. Thirty-one of 49 (63%) samples of normal skin obtained from horses with sarcoids contained BPV DNA. All samples subsequently sequenced had 100% homology with the expected sequences for the specific viral type. All tissues from healthy horses, nonsarcoid neoplasms, and papillomas were negative for BPV DNA.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Bovine papillomaviral DNA was detected in essentially all sarcoids examined. There appears to be regional variation in the prevalence of viral types in these tumors. The fact that we detected viral DNA in normal skin samples from horses with sarcoids suggests the possibility of a latent viral phase. Viral latency may be 1 explanation for the high rate of recurrence following surgical excision of sarcoids. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:741–744)

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine expression of a transforming gene (E5) of bovine papillomavirus in sarcoids, other tumors, and normal skin samples collected from horses with and without sarcoids.

Sample Population—23 sarcoids and 6 samples of normal skin obtained from 16 horses with sarcoids, 2 samples of normal skin and 2 papillomas obtained from horses without sarcoids, and 1 papilloma obtained from a cow.

Procedure—Protein was extracted from tissue samples collected from horses and incubated with agarose beads covalently coupled to Staphylococcus aureus protein A and an anti-E5 polyclonal antibody. Following incubation, proteins were eluted from the beads and electrophoresed on a 14% polyacrylamide gel and transferred to a polyvinylidene difluoride membrane. The E5 protein was detected by use of western blot analysis, using a chemiluminescence detection system.

Results—All 23 sarcoids had positive results for expression of E5 protein. Quantity of viral protein appeared to vary among sarcoids. All other tissues examined had negative results for E5 protein. Highest expression for E5 protein was observed in biologically aggressive fibroblastic variants of sarcoids, compared with expression in quiescent tumors.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—This study documented that activation and expression of the E5 gene is evident in sarcoids obtained from horses. These data support the conclusion that infection with bovine papillomavirus is important in the initiation or progression of sarcoids in horses. Treatment strategies designed to increase immune recognition of virally infected cells are warranted. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1212–1217)

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine quality and duration of progression-free survival (PFS) time in dogs with unresectable thyroid carcinomas treated with definitive megavoltage irradiation and analyze prognostic factors of PFS and patterns of failure (local recurrence vs metastasis).

Design—Prospective clinical trial.

Animals—25 dogs with locally advanced thyroid carcinomas and no evidence of metastasis.

Procedure—Dogs were treated with 48 Gy during 4 weeks on an alternate-day schedule of 4 Gy/fraction.

Results—Irradiation was safe and effective for treatment of large unresectable thyroid carcinomas. Progression-free survival rates were 80% at 1 year and 72% at 3 years. Time to maximum tumor size reduction ranged from 8 to 22 months. Factors affecting PFS were not found. Twenty-eight percent (7/25) of dogs developed metastasis. Dogs with bilateral tumors had 16 times the risk of developing metastases, compared with dogs with a single tumor. Dogs with no evidence of tumor progression had 15 times less risk of developing metastases. Radiation-induced hypothyroidism was suspected in 2 dogs 13 and 29 months after irradiation.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Irradiation is effective for local control of thyroid tumors, despite their slow regression rate. Results provided evidence that local tumor control affects metastatic outcome in dogs with thyroid carcinomas and is a strong basis for the development of new approaches that include irradiation in the management of dogs with advanced thyroid carcinomas. Improvements in local tumor control alone may be insufficient to improve survival times because of the high risk of metastatic spread before an initial diagnosis is made, which warrants initiation of early systemic treatment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216: 1775–1779)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome associated with cutaneous tumors treated via intratumoral chemotherapy with cisplatin and identify risk factors affecting local tumor control and complications in equidae.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—573 equidae with 630 cutaneous tumors.

Procedures—Medical records of horses, mules, donkeys, and ponies with cutaneous tumors treated via intratumoral chemotherapy with cisplatin were analyzed.

Results—549 horses, 13 mules, 8 donkeys, and 3 ponies with 630 histologically confirmed cutaneous tumors were included. Tumors included sarcoids (n = 409), squamous cell carci nomas (151), soft tissue sarcomas (28), cutaneous lymphomas (26), and melanomas (16). Overall cure rate, defined as local control at 4 years, was 93.3%. For all tumor stages combined, cure rates after 1 course of treatment were 96.3% for sarcoids, 96% for lym-phomas, 88% for squamous cell carcinomas, 85% for soft tissue sarcomas, and 81% for melanomas. Treatment protocol, tumor stage, and prior treatment were significant prog nostic factors for tumor control. Treatment efficacy was lower for large tumors, those with gross postoperative residual disease, and those that had been treated previously with other modalities. Treatment was well tolerated. Local reactions were more likely to occur and to be more severe after the third and fourth treatment sessions.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results confirmed the value of intratumoral chemotherapy with cisplatin for treatment of cutaneous tumors in equidae.The results cannot be extrapolated to other formulations of cisplatin or other protocols that might be used.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association